“Who’s That Girl?”: Peek Inside the ’50s Fashion Exhibit

Now on display at the Bonni Benrubi gallery, "Who's That Girl?" explores the work of 1950's fashion photographer, Georges Dambier, whose playful fashion images originally graced the pages of French "Elle."

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C/O Bonni Benrubi
Now on display at the Bonni Benrubi gallery, "Who's That Girl?" explores the work of 1950's fashion photographer, Georges Dambier, whose playful fashion images originally graced the pages of French "Elle."
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Bonni Benrubi
"I was attracted to Dambier's work because it is so joie de vivre," explains curator and owner Bonni Benrubi, who assembled the exhibit. "So different than some of today's fashion—happy. And he photographed the supermodels of the time: Suzy Parker, Dorien Leigh, Bettina, and the clothes are amazing. So 'Mad Men' and stylish now!"
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C/O Bonni Benrubi
This early-spring shot of Suzy Parker toting tulips is Bonni's special favorite of the entire exhibit: "[The photo is] romantic, beautiful model. You can see that this is Paris, another era."
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C/O Bonni Benrubi
Candid or even silly poses were a hallmark of Dambier's cheeky girl-next-door style. "The models are very relaxed," explains Benrubi. "They almost seem as if they are not working on a shot." This shot of Fiona Campbell Walker stealing a kiss from "The Hackney Horse" exemplifies Dambier's more playful photography.
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C/O Bonni Benrubi
Compulsive readers of modern fashion magazines will be struck by the comparative curvy-ness of Dambier's subjects, who were considered true supermodels in their hey day. "I think fashion models today are younger and thinner and less womanly than the models in the 1950's and early 60's," says Benrubi. Indeed, many of Dambier's ladies were slightly older or had families—a big difference from the 15-year-old ingenues we're accustomed to seeing in glossy ad campaigns today.
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Getty Images
Perhaps the most striking aspect of Dambier's work, however, is how fresh and inspiring it still is even after fifty years of fashion evolution. This particular image of Suzy Parker at the Eiffel Tower feels like something that might appear in a modern "Vogue" editorial.
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