City Overprepares For New Snow After Blizzard Mess

Sunday, Jan 9, 2011  |  Updated 9:12 AM EDT
View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print
Meteorologist Chris Cimino has your forecast.

Meteorologist Chris Cimino has your forecast.

advertisement
Photos and Videos

Blizzard Botch Prompts EMS Swap

New changes with who handle's the city's emergencies. Some say if it's due to the handling of the 2010 blizzard, the change is unfair.
More Photos and Videos

New York City came out overprepared Friday for a weak storm that delivered just a few inches of snow -- not enough to plow in most places and not likely enough for the mayor to redeem himself from a disastrous response to a post-Christmas blizzard.

Flakes melted onto wet streets as snowplows -- some equipped with global positioning devices since the blizzard foul-up -- and salt spreaders sat idle in neighborhoods all over the city.

By midafternoon, the National Weather Service reported the highest accumulation citywide was in Central Park, with a little less than 2 inches, a mere dusting compared with the holiday storm that dumped 29 inches in Staten Island, 2 feet in Brooklyn and 20 inches in Central Park.

Six to 12 inches was forecast Friday for parts of upstate New York, where dozens of schools were closed, but in the New York City area, a total of 3 to 5 inches was expected.

"They probably spent a small fortune getting prepared for nothing. For nothing!'' said Richie Quinn, 53, a butcher who lives in Brooklyn. ``Yet we were unprepared for the big boy.''

After that winter blast on the tail of a holiday travel weekend, entire neighborhoods went unplowed for days, ambulances got stuck and the overworked sanitation department allowed trash to pile up.

The response was so mired with problems --ncluding rumors of a deliberate work slowdown by sanitation workers _ that it is being xamined by federal and local investigators.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg's administration, which has reassigned some sanitation supervisors and demoted its EMS command chief, seized Friday's storm as a chance to restore its image as a government that smoothly handles emergencies.

Along with the GPS devices on some sanitation trucks, teams of workers were deployed throughout the city, toting video cameras that sent live feeds of street conditions back to commanders at emergency headquarters.

Bloomberg also visited a south Brooklyn neighborhood that had been hit hard by the last snowstorm.

"We don't think the snowfall will be anything like the Christmas blizzard, but we are ready for any eventuality,'' he told citizens at a senior center.

A big storm might have been a chance for Bloomberg to begin repairing his reputation that has been damaged in the aftermath of the late-December storm.

But it did not seem significant enough to make anyone soon forget past mistakes.

As the mayor left the center, Caroline Ruggiero, who said her street was not plowed for days, tried to approach him and ask why she and her neighbors have gone without garbage pickups since

Christmas. Security blocked her and Bloomberg walked away. "We still have piles of snow and we have not had a trash pickup yet,'' she said in an interview. "Never in all my life have I seen a snowstorm debacle like this.''

Some New Yorkers noticed the city's readiness for Friday's snow, even if it wasn't needed.

Patricia Perales, 34, of Brooklyn, said she saw salt trucks stationed Thursday night, long before flakes began falling Friday morning.

"It's night and day,'' she said of the difference between the storms. ``I had a cold walk to the subway, but other than that I barely noticed the snow.''

North of New York City in Westchester County, police reported auto accidents on several county parkways and Interstate 84 was closed for a stretch near the New York-Connecticut border.

In Long Island, most streets and highways were wet but snow-free. Still, authorities and residents took precautions, perhaps with memories of the last snowfall.

The Long Island Rail Road, which took several days to restore full service after the blizzard, added extra train service for the

Friday afternoon commute. "I won't drive in it. I get nervous,'' said Chris Greenberg, who was waiting for a train at Farmingdale.

New Jersey, where some roads went unplowed for days after the December blizzard, also ramped up its preparation _ state police said more troopers would be on state roads to help slow down traffic so plow drivers can complete their work safely.

The state was forecast to get 3 to 5 inches in scattered areas, and some schools planned to let out early, as slick roads and traffic accidents were reported in northern New Jersey.

Airports reported some delays and canceled flights, but nothing near the thousands of grounded flights that stranded passengers for days and days in December.

Delays of more than an hour were reported Friday morning at the Philadelphia airport and at two of the three major serving the New York area: Newark and LaGuardia.

About 300 flights were canceled at the three airports, most before the storm, said the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, the airports' operator.

Get the latest headlines sent to your inbox!
View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print
Leave Comments
What's New
Follow us on Instagram!
We post photos taken by our news team... Read more
Follow Us
Sign up to receive news and updates that matter to you.
Send Us Your Story Tips
Check Out