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Celebrity Trainers Share Workout Philosophies

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Wouldn't it be nice to know that Heidi Klum and Nicole Scherzinger have a trouble spot or struggle to get through the last 10 minutes of their workout, too?

    Celebrities face the same challenges as the rest of us when it comes to committing to a healthy lifestyle -- that's what Oxygen Magazine editor Helen Vong says she learned when she went to a recent fitness retreat in Los Angeles, where she got to work with some of Hollywood's trainers to the stars.

    "When it comes to fitness and diet, it takes the same level of commitment that regular folk must make to attain a lean figure," writes Vong in her blog on oxygenmag.com. "The three celebrity trainers that I met all espoused the same basic tenets of an Oxygen lifestyle: a hard work ethic and clean eating approach to food."

    Here's what some of those celebrity trainers told Vong:

    • Andrea Orbeck (trainer to Heidi Klum and Usher): "I'm a big believe in two things: consistency and intensity. You need to be able to commit to it for as long as you can and if a workout if going to be for a shorter duration than normal, it's got to be intense."
       
    • Jennifer Cohen (trainer to the contestants on the reality show "Shedding for the Wedding"): "Work out no less than three times per week. You want exercise to be part of your lifestyle so you want to integrate it into your life as easily as you can."
       
    • Adam Ernest (trainer to Mary J. Blige and Nicole Scherzinger): "I have people who train five to six days a week, but the bare minimum is two. Anything less than that, and you'll be in a perpetual state of jet lag, you'll always be sore. A lot of times, people start working out in January and large gyms will count on this. So they think 'I'm going to work out almost every day,' and maybe that would work for a few weeks. But then life happens and you miss a couple days, which makes you feel like you failed. People tend to quit at this point. It's a weird thing -- all or nothing. If you only have three days and you have just half an hour, then do that and commit and show up for the workout. Number one thing is to show up. That's really the biggest thing I tell people: don't set yourself up to fail."

    Read more at Oxygenmag.com.