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Happening Today: Russia Probe, Otto Warmbier, Health Care, Drones, Anita Pallenberg

What to Know

  • The father of Otto Warmbier, who was imprisoned in North Korea and returned in a coma, says the family is "adjusting to a different reality"
  • Drones carrying heart defibrillators could soon swoop in to help bystanders revive people stricken by cardiac arrest
  • Anita Pallenberg, a model and actress who had children with Keith Richards and served as a muse for The Rolling Stones, has died at age 75

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Special Counsel Looking Into Possible Obstruction of Justice by Trump, Reports Say

The special counsel appointed to investigate Russian influence in the 2016 presidential campaign is now examining whether President Trump tried to obstruct justice, The Washington Post reports. Accusations of obstruction arose last month when Trump fired FBI Director James Comey. Comey testified in a Senate hearing last week that he believed he was fired "because of the Russia investigation." Comey also testified he had told Trump he was not under investigation. The Post and The New York Times both reported that Mueller was seeking interviews with three Trump administration officials who weren't involved in Trump's campaign: Dan Coats, the director of national intelligence; Michael Rogers, the head of the National Security Agency; and Richard Ledgett, the former NSA deputy director. Mark Corallo, a spokesman for Trump's personal lawyer, responded to the Post report by saying: "The FBI leak of information regarding the president is outrageous, inexcusable and illegal."

Family of Freed North Korea Hostage Now Has “Different Reality”

The father of an American college student who was imprisoned in North Korea and was returned to his home state of Ohio in a coma  says the family is "adjusting to a different reality." Fred Warmbier told Fox News' Tucker Carlson that his son, Otto, was "terrorized and brutalized" during his 17-month detention and has been in a coma for more than a year. "The day after he was sentenced, he went into a coma," the father said in an interview scheduled to air Thursday night. He said he and his wife, Cindy, only learned of their son's condition last week. The 22-year-old University of Virginia student was medically evacuated from North Korea and arrived in Cincinnati. He was then taken by ambulance to the University of Cincinnati Medical Center. A hospital spokeswoman did not provide an update on his condition, but said his parents planned to hold a news conference.

5 Rebels Killed After Taking Hostages, Killing at Least 17, in Somalia's Capital, Officials Say

Somali survivors described harrowing scenes of the night-long siege of a popular Mogadishu restaurant by al-Shabab Islamic extremists that was ended by security forces. At least 17 people, including foreigners, were dead, police and an ambulance driver said. Survivors of the attack were led by soldiers from the Pizza House restaurant building. The injured were taken by ambulances. Al-Shabab claimed responsibility as the restaurant was under siege. Soldiers surrounded the restaurant building and used guns mounted on the backs of vehicles to neutralize the militants. Troops entered the ground floor while the insurgent snipers held positions upstairs.

GOP Health Care Law Could Cost Nearly 1 Million Jobs, Report Finds

The American Health Care Act, the GOP’s answer to Obamacare, could end up costing the U.S. economy close to 1 million jobs, researchers predicted. If the bill passes, it would initially boost jobs and increase economic output, "however, cuts in funding for Medicaid and health subsidies then begin to deepen, triggering sharp job losses and broad disruption of state economies in the following years," said Leighton Ku, director of the Center for Health Policy Research, who led the study team. Health care jobs are an enormous part of the U.S. economy — making for 18 percent of the total Gross Domestic Product or GDP. Hospitals, clinics, doctors and health care services are major sources of jobs, too.

Drones Carrying Defibrillators Could Aid Heart Emergencies

It sounds futuristic: drones carrying heart defibrillators swooping in to help bystanders revive people stricken by cardiac arrest. Researchers tested the idea and found drones arrived at the scene of 18 cardiac arrests within about 5 minutes of launch. That was almost 17 minutes faster on average than ambulances — a big deal for a condition where minutes mean life or death. Drone-delivered devices weren't used on patients in the preliminary study, but the results are "pretty remarkable" and proof that the idea is worth exploring, said Dr. Clyde Yancy, a former American Heart Association president who was not involved in the study. Cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death worldwide, killing more than 6 million people each year. Most happen at home or in other nonmedical settings and most patients don't survive. Drones are increasingly being tested or used in a variety of settings, including to deliver retail goods to consumers in remote areas, search for lost hikers and help police monitor traffic or crowds.

Anita Pallenberg, Muse for The Rolling Stones, Dies at 75, Spokesperson Says

Anita Pallenberg, a model and actress who had children with Keith Richards and served as a muse for The Rolling Stones, has died. She was 75. A spokesperson for Richards told The Associated Press that Pallenberg died at St. Richard's Hospital in the city of Chichester, located in southeast England. The cause of death was not revealed, but the statement released Wednesday said Pallenberg "had been ill for some time" and that her family was by her side. "A most remarkable woman. Always in my heart," Richards said in a statement. Pallenberg was born on April 6, 1942. She served as inspiration for the Stones' "Miss Amanda Jones" and "You Got the Silver." She appeared in films like "Barbarella," ''Candy," ''Le Berceau de Cristal" and "Performance," which included Mick Jagger.

Soupman, of Seinfeld's 'Soup Nazi,' Files for Bankruptcy

A company that sells soup from the recipes of the chef who was the real-life model of the Soup Nazi on "Seinfeld" has filed for bankruptcy less than a month after its chief financial officer was arrested on charges he cheated the government out of employment-related taxes. Soupman Inc., based in Staten Island, sells soups made from the recipes of Al Yeganeh. Yeganeh and his soup stand were the inspirations behind the "Seinfeld" television show character, who shouted the catchphrase "No soup for you!" The company's CEO, Jamie Karson, said "the combination of legacy liabilities and recent company developments have made it necessary to seek bankruptcy protection." Karson said its products, including jambalaya, lobster bisque and chicken gumbo, would still be available in stores. Last month, CFO Robert Bertrand was charged in Brooklyn federal court with failing to pay Medicare, Social Security and federal income taxes for company employees. The government said he paid employees unreported cash and gave some workers large unreported stock awards from 2010 through 2014.

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