Cases of Enterovirus EV-D68 Confirmed in New Jersey, New York, Connecticut: Officials | NBC New York

Cases of Enterovirus EV-D68 Confirmed in New Jersey, New York, Connecticut: Officials

Cases of the uncommon respiratory illness have been identified in 12 states across the nation

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Officials Wednesday confirmed cases of enterovirus EV-D68 in New York City, Long Island, New Jersey and Connecticut as the unusual and potentially severe respiratory illness continues to affect children across the U.S. Marc Santia reports. (Published Friday, Sept. 19, 2014)

    Officials Wednesday confirmed cases of enterovirus EV-D68 in New York City, Long Island, New Jersey and Connecticut as the unusual and potentially severe respiratory illness continues to sweep across the U.S.

    Officials said that at least one of the 12 confirmed cases of the virus previously confirmed in New York state is in New York City, another case is on Long Island and one is in Westchester. Cases have been reported in more than a dozen states nationwide.

    The CDC also confirmed a case in New Jersey on Wednesday. That case was identified from a specimen sent to the CDC from a Philadelphia hospital, the CDC said. The child was discharged from a hospital after their condition improved.

    On Long Island, a girl from North Hempstead was hospitalized earlier in the month and is now recovering at home, according to the Nassau County Health Department. 

    Cases of Enterovirus Confirmed in NYC, LI, NJ: Officials

    [NY] Cases of Enterovirus Confirmed in NYC, LI, NJ: Officials
    The rare respiratory illness has already sickened hundreds of children in more than a dozen states. Ida Siegal reports. (Published Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014)

    Connecticut health officials also said that a child in that state also contracted the virus. The child was being treated at Yale-New Haven Hospital, but it's not clear what town that child was from..

    Enteroviruses, which usually cause mild cold-like symptoms that last about a week, are common, afflicting up to 15 million people in the U.S. each year, but the CDC says this particular strain of the virus is unusually severe.

    Infants and children are at particular risk, and though most affected people recover on their own and have no future problems, those with weakened immune systems or underlying medical conditions such as asthma may need to be hospitalized.

    There is no vaccination. Prevention involves hand-washing, disinfecting surfaces and any usual steps to prevent the spread of flu.

    What You Need to Know About Enterovirus

    [NATL-NY] What You Need to Know About Enterovirus
    An outbreak of an uncommon virus, Enterovirus D68, has made children in a dozen states ill and has left some hospitalized, according to NBC News. Children with asthma are particularly affected. Andrew Siff has the story. (Published Friday, Sept. 19, 2014)

    There are more than 100 types of enteroviruses. EV-D68 was first identified in California in 1962.

    Health officials urge anyone who has trouble breathing, or notices a child does, to call a doctor immediately.  


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