9/11 Terror Threat Prompts Tight Security at Stadiums This Weekend

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Mayor Bloomberg, NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly, and FBI official Janice Fedarcyk hold a press conference Thursday night to explain the "specific, credible but uncorroborated" terror threat on the 10th anniversary of 9/11. (Published Thursday, Sep 8, 2011)

    Sports fans will notice extra-tight security at sporting events and stadium parking lots this weekend after threat information indicates a possible car bomb plot by al-Qaida timed for the 10th anniversary of 9/11.

    The concern about homemade explosives packed into vehicles will lead to more security where people park in large numbers. That means more checks at weekend sporting events.

    The U.S. Open is going on all weekend in Queens, the Mets play the Cubs at home Friday, Saturday and Sunday, and the Jets play the Cowboys on Sunday. The Yankees and Giants are away.

    The New York Red Bulls also play this weekend in New Jersey, New York Liberty plays Indiana at Madison Square Garden on Friday and the Brooklyn Cyclones play the Staten Island Yankees both Saturday and Sunday.

    Mayor Bloomberg, who said the city is taking the threat seriously, cautioned New Yorkers to watch out for anything suspicious but said people should go about their business, noting his plans to attend the U.S. Open on Saturday.

    "The bottom line is, I took the subway to work this morning, I'm going to tennis tomorrow night, I'm going to go to all of the events, I'm going to walk the streets, and I feel perfectly safe," he told NBC New York in an interview.

    The NYPD has increased already-tight security throughout the city because of the intelligence.

    A joint FBI-Department of Homeland Security bulletin said al-Qaida may be considering attacks that use improvised explosives packed in vehicles that would be similar to the "attempted attack on Times square" by Faisal Shahzad in May 2010.

    Al-Qaida may be aiming to avenge the death of Osama bin Laden and other key terror figures, the bulletin said.

    New York City and Washington, D.C., are mentioned in the non-specific car bomb threats, according to a source.