Counter Intelligence: Breast Milk, Keys & Hopscotch | NBC New York

Counter Intelligence: Breast Milk, Keys & Hopscotch

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    "Miracle on the Huson" hero pilot Sully and crew were recently handed the keys to New York City by Mayor Bloomberg. But what is a key to the city actually good for? Short answer: Not much.

    Check out our daily list of must-read articles that will have you chatting at the lunch counter, over instant message or wherever people actually talk these days.

    •  NCAA athletes who drink Vitamin water could test positive for drugs. The NCAA sponsor has six flavors that contain substances banned by the league. Though said flavors are not associated with the NCAA, they do contain banned or impermissible substances such as caffeine, garana-seed extract, taurine, L-theanine, green-tea extract and glucosamine.
       
    • The latest feat in technology: Producing human breast milk from goats. We know -- gross. Russian scientists are genetically engineering goats to produce the same milk as human mothers on a secret farm with some 90 female goats outside of Moscow.
       
    •  Good Samaritans are born with an "empathy gene" that allows them to share feelings with others, a new study shows. Childhood environment can change behavior slightly but you're either born nice or you're not. That said, don't bother thanking someone next time they do something nice for you -- they can't help it!
       
    • A new poll finds that hopscotch is the greatest playground game ever. The chalk-drawn, square-hopping game has been around since the Roman times when it was first used as a training exercise for soldiers. Hide-and-seek and skipping (really?) came in second and third, respectively. We beg to differ with the results. "Skip It," much? 
       
    • "Miracle on the Hudson" hero pilot Sully and crew were recently handed the keys to New York City by Mayor Bloomberg. But what is a key to the city actually good for? Short answer: Not much. The key Sully received in New York is a $100 replica of a key to City Hall from the 19th century. The original door is still there but the key is too small to actually open it. Nice.