Suspicious Powder Sent to NYC Home of Donald Trump's Son: NYPD | NBC New York
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Suspicious Powder Sent to NYC Home of Donald Trump's Son: NYPD

Preliminary tests indicate the powder isn't hazardous

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Sources told NBC 4 New York that the envelope was postmarked in Boston on March 7 and that the powder inside wasn't toxic. Andrew Siff reports. (Published Friday, March 18, 2016)

    The son of GOP presidential front-runner Donald Trump was sent an envelope containing a suspicious powder and a threatening note, authorities and law enforcement sources told NBC 4 York.

    Eric Trump’s security team called the NYPD at 7:15 p.m. after a suspicious envelope containing white powder was sent to his apartment in the Trump Parc building on Central Park South, according to police.

    Sources told NBC 4 New York that the envelope was postmarked in Boston on March 7 and that the powder inside wasn't toxic. 

    The sources said that a note in the envelope referenced that the powder wasn't toxic but threatened the younger Trump that a subsequent envelope would contain hazardous materials if Donald Trump didn't drop out of the presidential race.

    The letter was removed from the 32-year-old's home and taken to a lab for additional testing. 

    The 32-year-old son of the billionaire businessman has been seen on the campaign trail in recent days stumping for his father. He is Trump’s third child.

    At least one resident at the building said he wasn't fazed by the scare.

    "I live in the safest building in New York," said Todd Shapiro. "One thing I can tell you about living in a Trump building: It's 100 percent safe."

    The FBI's Joint Terrorism Task Force is working with the NYPD, Secret Service and U.S. Postal Inspectors to determine who sent the letter, a spokeswoman for the FBI said. 

    Trump did not respond to requests for comment from NBC 4 New York. On Twitter Friday, he made no mention of the mail and instead stuck to attacking his opponents

    New Yorkers say the apparent hoax marks a new chapter in a presidential campaign that's already led to violence against anti-Trump protesters.

    "I mean, it seems like a three-ring circus, frankly," said Julie Porter of the Upper West Side.

    "It's wild. It's like nothing I've ever seen before," said Connie Prescott of Grand Concourse in the Bronx. 

    -- Joe Valiquette contributed to this report


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