Networks Deserve a Break from Obama | NBC New York

Networks Deserve a Break from Obama

Communicator-in-chief hogs prime time yet again

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    NEWSLETTERS

    These relentless evening addresses begin to seem less like reaching out to the public and more like a cry for attention.

    Why does President Obama hate network television so much?

    Ever since the presidential race heated up last year, he has done nothing but hog valuable network programming time with his many speeches and addresses and debates. And this year it has already gotten worse: prime time coverage of inaugural events, then a speech about the economy and a news conference that ended up mostly on the same topic -- and now he's going on the television again next Tuesday.

    He'll be holding another news conference, and chances are questions will center on the economy yet again. This will give him a chance to  remind us that it still hasn't improved, we must be patient, he is infuriated with the bonus-seeking monsters at AIG, and he is particularly upset with how a bunch of scammy derivatives traders and their sleazy bosses at a whole range of financial institutions continue to make him, the president of the United States, look like an impotent clown.

    But in holding this news conference, he will be taking up precious minutes that the four broadcast networks could be selling for much-needed cash moneys. These are difficult times for us all!

    The major networks are all civic-minded enough to know that grumbling about lost ad revenues won't win them a lot of friends, so the best thing we can do under the circumstances is just keep the television off Tuesday. That's right: boycott President Obama. Continuing to watch him only encourages him. And unless you want to tune in to more dreary lectures about the economy every time you flip on the TV at night, you must help nip these attention-seeking stunts in the bud.

    It's tough love for the president, but it's absolutely necessary if you ever want to see "The Biggest Loser" again.

    The television critic Sara K. Smith does not own a television. She writes for NBC and Wonkette.