new york state parks

Outdoor Space to Come to Site of Ex-NYPD Tow Pound on Manhattan's Western Shore

The $20 million construction project will also include environmental abatement, repaving, and installation of railings and lighting.

NY State Parks

What to Know

  • New York State has begun Phase 1 of the transformation of Pier 76 into new recreational space that will be ready to open to the public by June 1.
  • Gov. Andrew Cuomo made the announcement Wednesday regarding the former 5.6-acre NYPD impound parking facility on Manhattan's western shore, which will be renovated for its inclusion in Hudson River Park.
  • The impound facility's steel support structure will be temporarily left intact to create a unique setting and partial shade among the recreational site, which will also include benches.

New York State has begun Phase 1 of the transformation of Pier 76 into new recreational space that will be ready to open to the public by June 1.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo made the announcement Wednesday regarding the former 5.6-acre NYPD impound parking facility on Manhattan's western shore, which will be renovated for its inclusion in Hudson River Park.

The state recently took possession of Pier 76, located at West 38th Street and 12th Avenue, from New York City. In January, the city transferred over control of the tow pound to New York State and vacated the site as part of the state budget agreement.

The 1998 Hudson River Park Act requires the city to transfer possession of the pier, at least half of which has to be used for passive and active open space, but that transfer never took place, according to state. After more than 20 years of stalled plans, the beginning of Phase 1 of the transformation has officially begun with planning for the long-term use of Pier 76 to be completed by the Hudson River Park Trust, a joint city-state partnership that is expected to lease the pier from State Parks.

The state Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation has already begun a partial demolition of the 245,000 square-foot impound facility in order to create an interim public recreation space set to include a walking area and outdoor flexible space.

The impound facility's steel support structure will be temporarily left intact to create a unique setting and partial shade among the recreational site, which will also include benches.

The $20 million construction project will also include environmental abatement, repaving, and installation of railings and lighting.

"COVID highlighted the importance of outdoor recreational spaces for New Yorkers, and it is critical that we expand open space as we continue to build back better," Cuomo said in a statement. "After more than 20 years of inaction, the transformation of Pier 76 will convert a blight on Manhattan's western shore into a crown jewel for the Hudson River Park and create a beloved urban recreational space that will be enjoyed by all for generations to come."

"Pier 76 is going to be a wonderful resource for residents of Chelsea, Clinton and Midtown communities, who have been waiting patiently for this to happen. Pier 76 will join the other facilities of Hudson River Park as destinations for safe, healthy, and family-friendly outdoor recreation, with spectacular urban and waterfront views," State Parks Commissioner Erik Kulleseid said in a statement.

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