Sigur Rós Mesmerizes at Madison Square Garden

Icelandic post-rock/ambient band Sigur Rós plays an ethereal set at Madison Square Garden

19 photos
1/19
Michel Dussack
Icelandic post-rock/ambient band Sigur Rós plays an ethereal set at Madison Square Garden. Photos by Michel Dussack
2/19
Michel Dussack
For the first few tracks, Sigur Rós played behind a barely transparent curtain that helped the band set the mood. Photos by Michel Dussack
3/19
Michel Dussack
Sigur Rós' lead vocalist Jón Þór "Jónsi" Birgisson, more commonly referred to as just Jónsi. Photos by Michel Dussack
4/19
Michel Dussack
Jónsi's main instrument of choice is bowed guitar and his vocals, many of which are sung in falsetto. Photos by Michel Dussack
5/19
Michel Dussack
The crowd at Madison Square Garden watches on with intrigue. Photos by Michel Dussack
6/19
Michel Dussack
Georg "Goggi" Hólm serves as the bassist for Sigur Rós. Photos by Michel Dussack
7/19
Michel Dussack
Jónsi plays a keyboard tucked behind the drum kit while singing. Photos by Michel Dussack
8/19
Michel Dussack
Rounding out the core members of Sigur Rós is drummer Orri Páll Dýrason. Photos by Michel Dussack
9/19
Michel Dussack
The show marked the first New York show for Sigur Rós without their fourth member Kjartan "Kjarri" Sveinsson, who departed in January. Photos by Michel Dussack
10/19
Michel Dussack
Sigur Rós' set spanned almost two hours and included old favorites as well as material from their upcoming album "Kveikur", scheduled for release in June. Photos by Michel Dussack
11/19
Michel Dussack
Sigur Rós' songs are sung in two different languages - Icelandic and Vonlenska, more commonly known as Hopelandic. Photos by Michel Dussack
12/19
Michel Dussack
Hopelandic focuses entirely on the sounds of language and contains no grammar, meaning or distinct words. Photos by Michel Dussack
13/19
Michel Dussack
Because of the nature of Hopelandic, many of Sigur Rós' songs are open to much interpretation, and the same song can invoke different feelings for different people. Photos by Michel Dussack
14/19
Michel Dussack
An audience member stares up at Sigur Rós and their immensely visuals. Photos by Michel Dussack
15/19
Michel Dussack
Sigur Rós' setup included numerous lightbulbs mounting to poles at the front of the stage, and a giant screen behind the band for visuals to be played. Photos by Michel Dussack
16/19
Michel Dussack
It becomes increasingly difficult to track what songs are played at a Sigur Rós concert due to the language barrier as well as the fact that so many songs are untitled. Photos by Michel Dussack
17/19
Michel Dussack
However, the band ended their band set with Brennisteinn, a song off their upcoming album that was one of the heaviest songs of the night, with parts vibrating the entire arena. Photos by Michel Dussack
18/19
Michel Dussack
Sigur Rós quickly returned to the stage for a two song encore that ended with "untitled #8" (more commonly known as "Popplagið") off their album "( )". Photos by Michel Dussack
19/19
Michel Dussack
"Popplagið" served as a perfect ending for the show, as each member of the band played louder and faster which culminated in a massive climax before finally ending the show which many in attendance would argue bordered on a religious experience. Photos by Michel Dussack
Contact Us