Sandy Washed Away Enough Sand to Fill 1M Dump Trucks: Officials

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
    Getty Images
    Beach erosion, caused by Hurricane Sandy, is seen on Oct. 31, 2012 in Long Beach Island, N.J.

    When Sandy swept through the tri-state at the end of October, the storm forever changed the coastlines -- and now it's becoming clear just how much sand was washed away.

    The Army Corps of Engineers says more than 15 million cubic yards of sand were lost in the storm.

    That's equal to more than a million dump truckloads.

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    And that's just on beaches that the Army Corps of Engineers counts among its projects, so the total is likely even higher.

    Army Corps project beaches are those that the Corps has replenished in the past. The Corps is studying its projects to see which most need sand in the coming months.

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    In New Jersey, about 12 million cubic yards of sand were lost on project beaches, which include Long Beach Island, all of Monmouth along the ocean and most of south Jersey. 

    In New York, about 3.5 million cubic yards were washed away on Army Corps beaches; that land includes Gilgo Beach, the Rockaways, Coney Island, Westhampton and west of Shinnecock Inlet.

    Some still have enough sand to welcome tourists back this summer, while others are so far gone that waves are washing up to pilings and foundations of beachfront homes.

    The Corps recently agreed to expedite a $30 million dredging project that would restore sections of beaches damaged during Sandy.