Make Millions Recording Debt Collection Messages | NBC New York

Make Millions Recording Debt Collection Messages

Bill collectors thrive in recessions -- catch the fever!



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    Individuals can be comforted by the fact that, as broke as they are, they'll never be as broke as our federal government.

    Don't believe the mainstream media news when they say that nobody can find work anymore. Sure, unemployment is worse than it's been in years, and the auto and manufacturing and home construction and bank industries have minus zero employees -- but any old sap with a home recording studio and basic English skills can apparently get work producing phone messages for bill collectors.

    It's easy!

    You see, as more and more people fall behind on their credit card payments and car loans, more and more lenders have to come after those delinquents with increasingly threatening phone messages. And in our brand new economic depression, there are so many varieties of delinquency and so many types of late payers that these phone messages must be carefully crafted to extract the maximum amount of dollars from their individual recipients.

    The people who record these messages are in hot demand. Are you a nice lady with a smooth, friendly voice? You might be just the thing for an early debt collection recording, informing the listener that they're just a couple days overdue. If you're a grumpy man with a frightening barky voice, you might be suited to later-stage recordings when collectors really want to put the squeeze on severely overdue account holders.

    Either way, you can make $100 to $300 an hour at this stuff. And the best part is this: as our economy slides further into ruin, this looks to be a very reliable line of work for years to come.

    Professional voiceover artist and repossessions agent Sara K. Smith writes for NBC and Wonkette.