Sanders Talks Peanuts and Revolution on Colbert | NBC New York
Decision 2016

Decision 2016

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Sanders Talks Peanuts and Revolution on Colbert

Colbert turned Sanders' attention to the manners and culture of the people of South Carolina, where the next primary will be held

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    File image: Presidential candidate U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) looks on during a "Brunch with Bernie" campaign rally at the National Nurses United offices on Aug. 10, 2015 in Oakland, California.

    Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders took a break from the campaign trail Wednesday night to visit Stephen Colbert on "The Late Show" to talk about, you guessed, the strain on the middle class and the rising oligarchy in America. 

    But Colbert also turned Sanders' attention to the manners and culture of the people of South Carolina, where the next primary will be held. For the occasion, Colbert served Sanders beer and boiled peanuts. 

    "If you need the vote down there, you have to eat boiled peanuts," Colbert said. "Have you ever had a boiled peanut, OK? The recipe is very simple."

    Colbert pulled out a small container of peanuts for both of them, and then presented two beers to go along with the nuts. Sanders sipped to a cheering crowd.

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    "This wins me South Carolina?" Sanders said.

    "Yes it does," Colbert said. "If you like boiled peanuts it will certainly give you a leg up in South Carolina. People up here, when I offer them this food, they say, 'Oh, here comes Colbert with more of his damp food.'"

    After the light chat and refreshments, Sanders turned his attention to the "greed of the top 1 percent."

    "We're talking about a nation drifting into an oligarchy," Sanders said before invoking political movements like the Civil Rights and the suffragettes of the late19th and early 20th century. 

    Broaching the topic of revolution, a commonly proposed idea at most Sanders rallies, Colbert quoted President John F. Kennedy, saying, "Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable."

    But Sanders disagreed, and said, "When people come together, we can accomplish great things."