nyc mayoral race

Sean Bell's Mom Endorses Ray McGuire for NYC Mayor Day After Dad Endorsed Eric Adams

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What to Know

  • Sean Bell’s mother, Valerie Bell, endorsed businessman Ray McGuire for mayor of New York City.
  • The day before, Sean's father, William Bell, endorsed endorsed Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams, one of the Democratic candidates in a crowded mayoral race, announcing his support in a press conference.
  • Sean Bell, 23, was leaving his bachelor party at a Queens club in 2006 with friends and family when they were gunned down by five undercover police officers.

Sean Bell’s mother, Valerie Bell, endorsed businessman Ray McGuire for mayor of New York City -- a day after Sean's father endorsed Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams.

In a statement Friday, Valerie Bell said: "This is a consequential election. We have the chance to elect a leader who will guide New York City through this incredibly challenging time and help us emerge stronger, safer and more equitable."

Valerie's statement goes on to say: "It is a big responsibility, and we need to ensure that we choose a person who has the courage to stan up for what is right -- including to the NYPD -- without sacrificing the safety of all citizens deserve. That person is Ray McGuire and I'm proud to endorse him today."

McGuire, an accomplished businessman, was the head of global corporate and investment banking at Citigroup and the longest tenured head of investment banking in the history of Wall Street. He has also served on boards for the New York Presbyterian Hospital, the New York Public Library, the Whitney Museum, Council of Urban Professionals, and countless others.

Just the day before, Sean's father, William Bell, endorsed Adams, one of the Democratic candidates in a crowded mayoral race, announcing his support in a press conference.

"Mr. Bell is a dear friend. Someone I respect and admire," Adams said Thursday during a press conference. "But, let's be clear: we wish we had never met. And, that may be strange to say, but in reality...[we met] because his son is no longer here."

Sean Bell, 23, was leaving his bachelor party at a Queens' club in 2006 with friends and family when they were gunned down by five undercover police officers. The bachelor party was taking place at a strip club being investigated by undercover police over accusations the owners promoted prostitution.

A plainclothes officer followed Bell and his friends as Bell entered his vehicle. The officer ordered the driver to stop. Instead, Bell accelerated the car, colliding with an unmarked police minivan. Five officers then opened fire on the car, firing about 50 bullets into Bell's car, killing him and wounding his friends who were all unarmed.

"This man cares about human beings, this man cares about community," William Bell said during his endorsement of Adams. "He stood out there with me in the cold weather. Not too many people did...especially since he is an ex-cop...and that gave me a lot of belief in humanity."

William Bell went on to say that Admas has "been on both sides of the fence," adding that "it is just not politics with him."

Born in Brownsville and raised in South Jamaica, Queens, Adams is a former police officer who raised to the rank of captain and has spoken openly about being beaten by police at 15 years old.

"I hope I'm there when he wins...shaking his hand," William Bell said.

The day before William Bell's endorsement, a POLITICO article reported that Adams is leading the mayoral candidates in a new poll -- the first time fellow candidate Andrew Yang is not the top contender since he announced his run in January.

Eight weeks from the primary election in New York City, public safety remains near the top of the priority list for voters and mayoral candidates. NBC New York's Melissa Russo reports.

Adams was the first-place pick for 21% of the respondents in a three-day survey of 500 likely Democratic primary voters conducted last week, according to a copy of the survey obtained by POLITICO. Yang followed in second place with 18%, and City Comptroller Scott Stringer had 15%.

Adams is leading among Black voters, with 47% of their support, compared to 11% of whites and 8% of Hispanics polled, POLITICO reports. Meanwhile, Yang polled best among Hispanic voters with 22%. The survey also notes that Stringer did best of the eight candidates polled among white voters with 24%.

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