New York City

NYC to kick off first Korean Thanksgiving festival

The Korean Cultural Center New York will host a pop-up market and panels showcasing Chuseok, one of the largest Korean holidays.

Korean Cultural Center New York

What to Know

  • An open-air market called MAUM Market will feature 50 AAPI-owned small businesses within art, fashion, home and food at Denizen Bushwick from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 9.
  • The next day of celebration is the Hangawi Korean Festival at Samsung 837 from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. and will have several cultural demonstrations, culinary tastings, interactive activities and live panels.
  • Visitors can expect a showcase of traditional clothing, embroidery and ceramics, while a chance to learn Korean calligraphy.

The Korean Cultural Center New York (KCCNY) will host New York City's first community pop-up market, panels and workshops to celebrate Chuseok, one of the most significant Korean holidays.

Chuseok, otherwise known as Hangawi or Korean Thanksgiving, is when family and friends gather to share stories and give thanks to their ancestors during the autumn equinox.

The KCCNY is partnering with the NYC Department of Small Business Services and the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce on the weekend festivities.

"Working together with the NYC Department of Small Business Services and the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce, we hope this will be an opportunity to foster economic growth and also celebrate the beauty of cross-cultural exchange," said Michael CheonSoo Kim, Executive Director of the Korean Cultural Center New York.

Entry is free and open to the public, but online RSVPs are requested for attendance under the KCCNY website.

The event is broken down into two days. Saturday, Sept. 9 is led by MAUM Market at Denizen Bushwick from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. This open-air market features 50 AAPI-owned small businesses within art, fashion, home and food.

The next day is the Hangawi Korean Festival at Samsung 837 from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. and will have several cultural demonstrations, culinary tastings, interactive activities and live panels.

“As the son of immigrant New York City small business owners, I know first-hand how important it is for government to partner with organizations like KCCNY and MAUM to lift up the entrepreneurial talent in our communities," said Kevin D. Kim, Commissioner of the NYC Department of Small Business Services.

MAUM translates to "heart and mind" in Korean. The headlining project "MAUM Market" is a local-oriented company that advocates for Asian-owned small businesses and establishes a broader awareness of Korean culture.

Visitors can expect a showcase of traditional clothing, embroidery and ceramics, while a chance to learn Korean calligraphy.

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