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Happening Today: Putin, Roy Moore, Donald Trump, Depression, Breast Cancer, Bullying

What to Know

  • Russian President Vladimir Putin visited a Russian military air base in Syria and announced a partial pullout of Russian forces
  • The CDC reports one in five children — some 15 million — have a diagnosable mental, emotional or behavioral disorder in a given year
  • A woman's video of her tearful son recounting being bullied at middle school has prompted a wave of support from athletes and entertainers

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Vladimir Putin Meets With Bashar Assad in Syria

Russian President Vladimir Putin visited a Russian military air base in Syria and announced a partial pullout of Russian forces from the country. Putin made a stopover at the Hemeimeem air base in Syria's coastal province of Latakia while en route to Egypt. The base, in the heartland of Syrian President Bashar Assad's Alawite minority, has served as the main foothold for the Russian military campaign in Syria. Speaking to the Russian troops at the base, Putin said that he had ordered the military to withdraw a "significant part" of the Russian contingent in Syria. He added in remarks carried by Russian news agencies that "if the terrorists again raise their heads, we will deal such blows to them they have never seen." Meanwhile, Syrian state TV said that Ashar Assad met up with Putin at the air base in Syria earlier in the morning. The Russian military has said previously that they will maintain their presence at the Hemeimeem air base and the naval facility in Tartus.

Most Alabama Republicans Say They Are Voting for Roy Moore

Most Republican leaders in Alabama say they plan to vote for Roy Moore, despite sexual misconduct allegations against the former judge that have prompted others around the country to say he should never be allowed to join the U.S. Senate. The accusations against Moore have left many GOP voters and leaders in a quandary. Voters face the decision of whether to vote for Moore, accused of sexual misconduct with teenagers decades ago when he was a county prosecutor, or sending Democrat Doug Jones to Washington, which would narrow the GOP's already precarious majority in the Senate. They also could write in a name on their ballots or simply stay home. Meanwhile, most GOP politicians in the state must run for re-election next year — where they will face Moore's enthusiastic voting base at the polls.

Donald Trump Accusers “Should Be Heard,” Ambassador Nikki Haley Says

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley said the women who have accused President Trump of sexual misconduct have the right to speak up and be heard, NBC News reported. Haley appeared on CBS' "Face the Nation and broke from the administration's line on the 16 sexual misconduct allegations against the president, with the White House saying that the women were lying and voters rejected their accusations when they elected Trump. "They should be heard, and they should be dealt with," Haley said. "And I think we heard from them prior to the election. And I think any woman who has felt violated or felt mistreated in any way, they have every right to speak up."

Generation at Risk: Depression, Anxiety Crisis Deepening in America

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports one in five American children, ages 3 through 17 — some 15 million — have a diagnosable mental, emotional or behavioral disorder in a given year. Recent research indicates serious depression is worsening in teens, especially girls and the suicide rate among girls reached a 40-year high in 2015, according to a CDC report. Teens are known for their moodiness, and adolescence — a particularly turbulent time of life — is actually one of the most vulnerable periods to develop anxiety and depression. Some 50 percent of cases of mental illness begin by age 14, according to the American Psychiatric Association.

Blood Test May Help Predict Which Breast Cancers Will Recur, Study Finds

A blood test five years after breast cancer treatment helped identify some women who were more likely to relapse, long before a lump or other signs appeared, a preliminary study found. It was the largest experiment so far to use these tests, called liquid biopsies, for breast cancer. Results suggest they someday may help reveal which women need longer preventive therapy and which ones can be spared it. The test — CellSearch, sold by Menarini-Silicon Biosystems — looks for stray cancer cells in the blood. Breast cancer survivors may be tempted to rush out and get it, but doctors say it's too soon for that. The new study should spur more research.

Athletes, Entertainers Rush to Support Bullied Tennessee Boy

A woman's video of her tearful son recounting being bullied at middle school has prompted a wave of support from athletes and entertainers. Kimberly Jones said in a Facebook post she had just picked up her son, Keaton, from school because he was too afraid to go to lunch. In the video, Keaton said other students call him ugly, make fun of his nose and tell him he has no friends. He said milk was poured on him and ham was put down his clothes. The video had more than 18 million views as of Sunday, and a crowdsourcing page for Keaton's future education had raised more than $29,000.

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