'Chicago Fire' Actress DuShon Monique Brown Dies - NBC New York

'Chicago Fire' Actress DuShon Monique Brown Dies

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    NEWSLETTERS

    'Chicago Fire' Actress DuShon Monique Brown Dies
    Getty Images, File
    In this file photo, DuShon Brown attends TV Guide Celebrates Cover Stars Taylor Kinney & Jesse Spencer at RockIt Ranch on April 10, 2017, in Chicago.

    “Chicago Fire” actress DuShon Monique Brown died Friday, her talent agency confirmed to NBC 5.

    Brown, 49, played Connie, the assistant to Chief Boden, on the popular NBC drama. She died shortly after noon at St. James Olympia Field Hospital, according to the Cook County medical examiner. Her agent, Robert Schroeder, said she died of natural causes, but the medical examiner's office had yet to make an official ruling.

    "We are devastated by the loss of a very talented and kindhearted soul," Schroeder said. "She brought laughter and joy to many, and she will be greatly missed."

    Dick Wolf, the producer behind the "Chicago" franchise, lamented Brown's death in a statement Friday.

    Tom Pennington/Getty Images

    "The Chicago Fire family is devastated to lose one of its own," he said. "Our thoughts and prayers are with DuShon's family and we will all miss her."

    A letter was also sent home to parents of Kenwood Academy High School students, where Brown previously worked as a counselor, notifying families of her death, the Chicago Tribune reported. The school did not immediately respond to calls and emails requesting the letter.

    DuShon was a film, television, commercial and voice over actress who also graced the stages of many Chicago theaters, Schroeder said.

    Her biography on Grossman & Jack Talent's website lists a litany of her theatre roles—including those at Steppenwolf, Goodman and Chicago theatre companies.

    In addition to "Chicago Fire," Brown also appeared in shows such as “Empire,” “Shameless,” “Boss” and “Prison Break” among others.

    "At this difficult time we ask that privacy of the family and loved ones be respected," Schroeder said.