Counter Intelligence: Summer Camp for Atheists | NBC New York

Counter Intelligence: Summer Camp for Atheists

Campers play "Evolution," learn about philosophy

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    Campers play games called "Evolution," learn about Greek philosophers and sing a scientifically accurate version of "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star" at atheist camp.

    Check out what summer camp for atheists is like and take a look at our list of must-reads that will have you chatting at the lunch counter, over IM or wherever it is that people actually talk these days.

    • It's summer camp -- without grace. One of five summer camps for atheists and non-believers across the country sent their kids to a state park outside Nevada this week where they indulged traditional camping activities -- with a twist. Campers play critical thinking games like "Evolution," learn about Greek philosophers and sing a scientifically accurate version of "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star."
       
    • A U.S. Army Major deployed to Afghanistan said he shouldn't go overseas because he thinks President Obama was ineligible to be president in the first place. Obama was born in Hawaii two years after it became a state but the solider said he thinks Obama is not a U.S. citizen. The service member said he "would be acting in violation of international law by engaging military actions outside the United States under this President's command." 
       
    • A producer in Hollywood claims he wrote the original plot for ABC's "Lost" in 1977. The suit, filed by Anthony Spinner, claims execs at ABC passed up his version of the hit drama three times and then created a rip-off version in 2004. Spinner cited similarities such as an "airplane headed to Los Angeles [that] crashes into a tropical jungle-like environment." He is suing for damages and wants a portion of the royalties.
       
    • Flying to nowhere just got a budget boost. A spending bill in the House would throw $173 million to help subsidize small airlines that fly to unpopular destinations, near-empty planes and, in some cases, routes that take longer to fly than to drive. The Essential Air Services program is kept alive as "a promise made to rural America," according to a letter written on behalf of 22 senators who petitioned the White House for more money.