Bronx

Who Are the Victims of the Bronx Fire Tragedy? What We Know So Far

More information on the victims in NYC's deadliest fire in 30 years is expected in the coming days. Here's what we know so far

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What to Know

  • Eight children are among the 17 confirmed dead in Sunday's Bronx fire tragedy; many are still fighting for their lives in hospitals
  • Most of the fatalities were people overcome by smoke as hallways of the 19-story East 181st Street building turned into ash clouds
  • None of the names or ages of the victims have officially been released, but a senior police official shared some of the children's details

New York City's deadliest fire in three decades claimed the lives of at least 17 people, eight of them children. A dog lost from its owner's grip in her desperate attempt to escape the flames swallowing the 19-story Bronx high-rise where she lived is also among the dead. More lives may be lost in the days to come as well.

None of the victims' identities have been officially released, but a senior police official with direct knowledge of the investigation shared some information with News 4 regarding six of the youngest who lost their lives. Two were just 5, and several appear to be from the same families.

According to the senior police official, the children taken to hospitals who later died included:

  • Fatoumata Dukureh, age 5, female
  • Mariam Dukureh, age 11, female
  • Hawa Mahamdou, age 5, female
  • Mustapha Dukyhreh, age 11, male
  • Omar Jambay, age 6, male
  • Toure Seydou, age 12, male

The fire, sparked by a space heater in one of the units on East 181st Street, injured more than 60 people. The senior police official told News 4 at least 10 children in addition to those who died were taken to hospitals. They range in age from 7 months to 16 years. No updates on their conditions were immediately known.

At least a dozen victims including adults were said to be still fighting for their lives early Monday as hospitals staff tried desperately to mitigate the loss.

Most of the dead were people who succumbed to smoke inhalation in the ashy hallways of the 19-story building, officials have said. Here's what else we know:

  • Nine of at least 20 victims initially transported to St. Barnabas Hospital died. Two of those were children.
  • By Monday morning, seven patients intubated were taken to Cornell or Westchester Medical Center. The remaining patients have been discharged.
  • Two of 19 patients transferred to Jacobi Medical Center died. Five remain at the hospital in serious condition, while the others have been either discharged or transferred to other facilities.

The Red Cross is assisting at least 21 families that were displaced by the blaze. Here are some ways you can help the victims.

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