Angry Worshippers Lash Out Against Trump's Jerusalem Decision Across Muslim World - NBC New York
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Angry Worshippers Lash Out Against Trump's Jerusalem Decision Across Muslim World

The president's decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital triggered warnings from America's friends and foes alike that he is needlessly stirring more conflict in an already volatile region

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Clash in West Bank Follow US Decision on Israel’s capital

    Palestinians clashed with Israeli troops in the wake of President Donald Trump’s controversial decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital.

    (Published Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017)

    Large crowds of worshippers across the Muslim world staged anti-U.S. marches Friday, some stomping on posters of Donald Trump or burning American flags in the largest outpouring of anger yet at the U.S. president's recognition of bitterly contested Jerusalem as Israel's capital.

    In the holy city itself, prayers at Islam's third-holiest site dispersed largely without incident, but Palestinians clashed with Israeli troops in several dozen West Bank hotspots and on the border with the Gaza Strip.

    A 30-year-old Gaza man was killed by Israeli gunfire, the first death of a protester since Trump's dramatic midweek announcement. Two Palestinians were seriously wounded, health officials said.

    Dozens of Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza were hit by live rounds or rubber-coated steel or inhaled tear gas, the officials said.

    Later Friday, the Israeli military said its Iron Dome missile-defense system intercepted a rocket fired from Gaza into southern Israel, but no injuries were reported.

    Trump's pivot on Jerusalem triggered warnings from America's friends and foes alike that he is needlessly stirring more conflict in an already volatile region.

    The religious and political dispute over Jerusalem forms the emotional core of the Israeli-Arab conflict. The ancient city is home to major Muslim, Jewish and Christian shrines and looms large in the competing national narratives of Israelis and Palestinians.

    Trump's decision on Jerusalem is widely seen in the region as a blatant expression of pro-Israel bias, but it was unclear if protests and confrontations would maintain momentum after Friday. More extensive violence has erupted in the Palestinian areas in the past, including deadly bloodshed triggered by disputes over Jerusalem.

    Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas' Fatah movement and other groups had called for three "days of rage" this week. However, Abbas remains an opponent of violence, saying it's counterproductive and that he might at some point order his security forces to contain protests.

    Separately, Fatah's rival, the Gaza-based Islamic militant Hamas, called this week for a third uprising against Israel, but such appeals have fizzled as Palestinians become more disillusioned with their leaders.

    Palestinians Protest While Netanyahu Hails Trump

    [NATL] Palestinians Protest While Netanyahu Hails Trump

    Reacting to President Donald Trump's recognition of Jerusalem as Israel's capital, Palestinians are protesting in cities across the West Bank and Gaza Strip while Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu called Trump's actions "a milestone."

    (Published Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017)

    On Friday, demonstrators in the West Bank torched heaps of tires, sending columns of thick black smoke rising over the cities of Ramallah and Bethlehem. Palestinian stone-throwers traded volleys in the streets with soldiers firing tear gas and rubber bullets. Along the Gaza-Israel border fence, Israeli troops fired at stone-throwers.

    Across the region — from Asia's Indonesia, Malaysia and Pakistan to North Africa's Algeria and Lebanon in the Levant — thousands of worshippers poured into the streets after midday prayers to voice their anger. Some protesters burned U.S. and Israeli flags or stomped Trump posters that showed the president alongside a Nazi swastika.

    In Jordan's capital of Amman, thousands marched through the center of town, chanting "America is the head of the snake."

    Pro-Western Jordan is a crucial U.S. ally in the fight against Islamic extremists, but King Abdullah II cannot afford to be seen as soft on Jerusalem. His Hashemite dynasty derives its legitimacy from its role as guardian of the Al Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem, Islam's third-holiest site.

    Trump's decision has also strained U.S. foreign relations.

    U.N. Mideast envoy Nickolay Mladenov told an emergency session of the U.N. Security Council on Friday that Trump's announcement created a "serious risk" of a chain of unilateral actions that would push the goal of peace further away.

    Trump Recognizes Jerusalem as Israel’s Capital, Delays Embassy Move

    [NATL] Trump Recognizes Jerusalem as Israel’s Capital, Delays Embassy Move

    The announcement broke with decades of policy and was opposed by Arab and European leaders.

    (Published Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017)

    The U.S. ambassador, Nikki Haley, told the council that the Trump administration is more committed to peace "than we've ever been before — and we believe we might be closer to that goal than ever before." Haley did not explain.

    In Europe, U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson on Friday played down the impact of Trump's policy shift, which also included a pledge to move the U.S. Embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. Tillerson said it will likely take years for the U.S. to open an embassy in Jerusalem.

    In a news conference with the French foreign minister, Tillerson said Trump's recognition of the city as Israel's capital "did not indicate any final status for Jerusalem."

    The United States is making clear that Jerusalem's borders will be left to Israelis and Palestinians to "negotiate and decide," he said.

    Most countries around the world have not recognized Israel's 1967 annexation of east Jerusalem and maintain their embassies in Tel Aviv. Under a longstanding international consensus, the fate of the city is to be determined in negotiations.

    Trump's announcement delivered a blow to Abbas, a supporter of the idea of reaching Palestinian statehood through U.S.-led negotiations with Israel. In siding with Israel on Jerusalem, he has said, the Trump administration effectively disqualified itself as a mediator.

    Parkland Shooting Survivor Calls 'BS' on Politicians' Gun Stance

    [NATL] Parkland Shooting Survivor Calls 'BS' on Politicians' Gun Stance

    Marjory Stoneman Douglas High senior Emma Gonzalez had a message for president Donald Trump and for other politicians on their failure to enact sensible gun laws: "BS." Gonzalez was one of several survivors to speak at a rally held outside the Federal Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, to speak out against the gun lobby.

    (Published Sunday, Feb. 18, 2018)

    However, Abbas has not decided how to move forward, including whether he will rule out future U.S.-brokered negotiations. Trump has said he still intends to propose a Mideast peace deal.

    More than two decades of intermittent Israeli-Palestinian negotiations have failed to bring the Palestinians closer to statehood. Some in Abbas' inner circle say the old paradigm, with the U.S. serving as mediator, is no longer relevant.

    On Thursday, a senior Fatah official said the Palestinians would not receive Vice President Mike Pence when he visits the West Bank later this month, but it was not immediately clear if the official spoke for Abbas.

    The Arab League, an umbrella group of close to two dozen states, is to meet Saturday to try to forge a joint position, followed next week by a gathering in Turkey of the 57-state Organization of Islamic Cooperation.

    Turkish officials said Russian President Vladimir Putin will travel to Turkey next week for talks with President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Jerusalem's status and other issues.

    Associated Press writers Fares Akram, Mohammed Daraghmeh, Alice Su and Edith M. Lederer also contributed to this report.

    Russians Indicted for Alleged Election Meddling Conspiracy

    [NATL] Russians Indicted for Alleged Election Meddling Conspiracy

    Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein announces indictments against 13 Russians and three Russian entities accused of meddling in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

    (Published Friday, Feb. 16, 2018)