Decades-Old Records Broken as Arctic Blast Freezes Tri-State — But a Brief Thaw Is Coming

A cold front will slide through Friday evening, bringing another shot of cold air for the weekend

What to Know

  • Temperatures slowly climb up Thursday after the coldest air in eight months froze the tri-state
  • The volatile weather pattern continues later this week, as the region could see temperatures into the 50s by Friday before they drop again
  • The mercury does climb up a bit early next week, with Storm Team 4 forecasting temps in the 50s with some rain showers

Temperatures slowly climb up Thursday after the coldest air in eight months froze the tri-state, bringing record-breaking cold to the region.

The blast of frigid, arctic air sticks around into the early morning but highs will up up to around 45 compared to the below-freezing temps on the previous day, according to Storm Team. Despite more clouds filling in, most areas will stay relatively dry and quiet on Thursday, though a few spotty sprinkles can’t be ruled out entirely east of the city midday. 

As the volatile weather pattern continues, temperatures will fluctuate from 30 to low 50s for the next 10 days.

By Friday afternoon, highs should be back in the 50s. A cold front will slide through Friday evening, bringing another shot of cold air for the weekend.

The mercury does climb up a bit early next week, with Storm Team 4 forecasting temps in the 50s with some rain showers through next Thursday. 

Record daily lows were set earlier this week across the region, from 25 degrees at Central Park (beating the previous record of 26 form 1926) to 25 in Bridgeport, Connecticut (previous record of 28 set in 2013) to 25 in Newark, New Jersey (previous record of 28 from 2017).

The arctic blast has not only sent shivers across the tri-state -- it has spread through the Midwest and eastern states, with the bitter weather setting new cold-temperature records from Mississippi to Maine.

Temperatures dipped to single digits early Wednesday across parts of the Northeast, not only just in New York City, but Buffalo and parts of Vermont and Ohio. The unseasonably cold weather extended to the Gulf Coast.

The incredibly cold temperatures have followed a snowstorm that the National Weather Service said contributed to nearly 30 percent of the country being covered in snow as of Wednesday.

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