stephen bannon

Manhattan DA Mulls Potential State Case Against Bannon After Presidential Pardon

Stephen Bannon's last minute pardon, mere hours before Trump left office, was especially notable given that the prosecution was still in its early stages and any trial was months away.

NBC Universal, Inc.

What to Know

  • The Manhattan District Attorney's Office is considering whether to bring a state court case against Stephen Bannon, who received an 11th-hour pardon from then-President Donald Trump after he was indicted on federal fraud charges, according to a source familiar with the investigation.
  • Bannon, one of the former's president staunch supporters and ex-strategist, had been charged with duping thousands of donors who believed their money would be used to fulfill Trump’s chief campaign promise to build a wall along the southern border.
  • Instead, he allegedly diverted over a million dollars, paying a salary to one campaign official and personal expenses for himself.

The Manhattan District Attorney's Office is considering whether to bring a state court case against Stephen Bannon, who received an 11th-hour pardon from then-President Donald Trump after he was indicted on federal fraud charges in connection to an alleged fundraising scheme, according to a source familiar with the investigation.

According to the source, the Manhattan District Attorney's Office is in the process of gathering documents as part of its investigation.

Bannon, one of the former's president staunch supporters and ex-strategist, had been charged with duping thousands of donors who believed their money would be used to fulfill Trump’s chief campaign promise to build a wall along the southern border. Instead, he allegedly diverted over a million dollars, paying a salary to one campaign official and personal expenses for himself.

Bannon was arrested on the initial federal fraud charges Aug. 20 off the coast of Connecticut aboard a 150-yacht owned by Chinese billionaire

Bannon and three associates were accused of defrauding donors as they raised more than $25 million to build a wall along the southern border for the We Build the Wall nonprofit group. He had pleaded not guilty in the case.

At the time he was pardoned, Bannon was free on a $5 million bond secured by $1.75 million in cash or property while awaiting his trial, which had been scheduled for May.

Bannon's last-minute pardon, mere hours before Trump left office, was especially notable given that the prosecution was still in its early stages and any trial was months away. Whereas pardon recipients are conventionally thought of as defendants who have faced justice, often by having served at least some prison time, Bannon's pardon nullifies the prosecution and effectively eliminates any prospect for punishment.

Contact Us