Fungus May Cause New York Bats to Go Extinct

Researchers at Boston University took pictures of the myotis lucifugus, or 'little brown bat,' which their reports show may go extinct in less than 20 years due to a fungus that disrupts the bats' hibernation and causes them to starve to death.

4 photos
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Alan C. Hicks
A cluster of three little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus) infected with WNS at Graphite Mine in New York. Characteristic white fungal growth is visible on forearm, ears and nose areas. This image relates to an article that appeared in the Aug. 6, 2010, issue of Science, published by AAAS. The study, by Dr. Winifred Frick of Boston University in Boston, and colleagues is titled, "An Emerging Disease Causes Regional Population Collapse of a Common North American Bat Species."
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Alan C. Hicks
Pile of bat carcasses demonstrating the severity of mortality associated with WNS at Aeolus Cave in Vermont. This image relates to an article that appeared in the Aug. 6, 2010, issue of Science, published by AAAS. The study, by Dr. Winifred Frick of Boston University in Boston, and colleagues is titled, "An Emerging Disease Causes Regional Population Collapse of a Common North American Bat Species."
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Ryan von Linden
Little brown myotis (Myotis lucifugus) infected with White-Nose Syndrome at Graphite Mine in New York. Characteristic white fungal growth is visible on forearm and nose areas. This image relates to an article that appeared in the Aug. 6, 2010, issue of Science, published by AAAS. The study, by Dr. Winifred Frick of Boston University in Boston, and colleagues is titled, "An Emerging Disease Causes Regional Population Collapse of a Common North American Bat Species."
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Ryan von Linden
Map of current distribution and spread of WNS across eastern North America. This image relates to an article that appeared in the Aug. 6, 2010, issue of Science, published by AAAS. The study, by Dr. Winifred Frick of Boston University in Boston, and colleagues is titled, "An Emerging Disease Causes Regional Population Collapse of a Common North American Bat Species."
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