Yes -- There Really Was An Earthquake in New York! - NBC New York

Yes -- There Really Was An Earthquake in New York!

In less than one week, the Lower Hudson Valley area experienced its second tremor this year, according to data

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    NEWSLETTERS

    'I Thought One of the Kids Fell Out of the Bed': Earthquake Reaction

    A resident reacts after an earthquake in Mamaroneck. (Published Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2019)

    What to Know

    • At 8:09 p.m. Monday, a 1.27-magnitude earthquake was recorded in Mamaroneck, according to the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

    • After canvasing the area, no injuries or damages were reported, police say

    • This tremor follows the 1.1-maginitude earthquake reported in West Nyack Thursday

    If you were in Westchester County, felt the ground slightly move Monday night and thought “earthquake” – you were right!

    In less than one week, the Lower Hudson Valley area experienced its second tremor this year.

    At 8:09 p.m. Monday, a 1.27-magnitude earthquake was recorded in Mamaroneck, New York, according to the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. The epicenter appears to have been on Rockland Avenue between Hickory Grove Drive East and Jason Lane.

    The Mamaroneck Police Department says it received multiple call around 8 p.m. Monday for a "loud explosion" and after being dispatched they couldn't locate a source for the noise reported.

    Bloomberg via Getty Images

    After canvasing the area, no injuries or damages were reported, police say.

    The Mamaroneck tremor follows the 1.1-magnitude earthquake reported in West Nyack, in Rockland County, Thursday -- the first earthquake Lamont-Doherty registered for the region this year, according to the observatory's data.

    Kevin Krajick, of the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, tells News 4 that the magnitude at which one might feel a quake can vary depending numerous factors, including the depth at which the quake occurred (deeper means you are less likely to feel it) and the type of rocks in the area (harder, more rigid rocks will transmit seismic waves more efficiently than softer, crumbly ones).

    “That said, a general rule of thumb is that it has to reach about 2 or 2.5 magnitude to be felt by people on the surface. This one probably did not generate too much tangible movement, but it is possible a few people near the epicenter felt something,” he said in a statement.

    So, did you feel it?

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