Gang Smuggled Women to Queens, Forced Them to Have Sex With Dozens of Men a Day: Homeland Security - NBC New York

Gang Smuggled Women to Queens, Forced Them to Have Sex With Dozens of Men a Day: Homeland Security

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    NEWSLETTERS

    8 Men Arrested in Queens Sex Trafficking Ring

    Dozens of women were smuggled to New York City and forced to sell themselves for a group of men who are now facing charges, prosecutors say. Marc Santia reports.

    (Published Thursday, May 3, 2018)

    What to Know

    • Eight men have been arrested in an alleged sex trafficking ring in which women were smuggled from Mexico to Corona, Queens, authorities say

    • The women were forced to have sex with 30 to 40 men a day and held against their will, according to Homeland Security

    • Dozens of women have been rescued and are getting emotional and physical help, Homeland Security says

    Dozens of women were smuggled to New York City and forced to sell themselves for a group of men who are now facing charges, prosecutors say.

    Efrain Granados Corona and Emilio Rojas-Romero were extradited from Mexico to New York on sex trafficking charges Thursday, and escorted in cuffs through JFK Airport by special agents from Homeland Security Investigations, exclusive video obtained by News 4 shows. They're among eight men under arrest.  

    Prosecutors said the men are part of a gang that set up a multimillion dollar illegal business, smuggling dozens of unsuspecting women, adults and minors from Tenancingo, Mexico, to Corona, Queens. 

    The women were forced to have sex with 30 to 40 men a day, and were allegedly held against their will until agents from HSI cracked the case, said prosecutors. They were transported all over the five boroughs, Long Island, up to the Hudson Valley area and even other states.

    "They're vulnerable women that are taken advantage of, coming here to America for their dream that they see and hear about here in America, to only be taken and victimized by these individuals," said Anthony Scandiffio, acting deputy assistant director at ICE at Homeland Security.

    They were "basically taken advantage of from the moment they wake up to the moment they put their head down to sleep," he said.

    The feds said the operation in the tri-state area began in 2000.

    Authorities say they've rescued dozens of women are now working to get them the physical and emotional help they need after months of torture. 

    "That sends a huge message," said Scandiffio. "It shows that just because you're outside the U.S. doesn't mean that you're not vulnerable for the long arm of justice." 

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