MTA Help Point System Used at New Rochelle Train Station to Call in Suspicious Packages — Which Were Holding More Help Point Systems - NBC New York

MTA Help Point System Used at New Rochelle Train Station to Call in Suspicious Packages — Which Were Holding More Help Point Systems

Turns out, the suspicious packages were actually holding more of the Help Point systems being installed at the station

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Suspicious Package Investigation at New Rochelle Station

    The call about the suspicious package was made at one of the MTA"s new Help Point intercoms. Only problem: The packages in question were more of the same help centers used to actually make the call. NBC New York’s Gus Rosendale reports.

    (Published Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2019)

    What to Know

    • Someone at the New Rochelle train station Monday saw something suspicious, so they used an MTA Help Point Intercom to call it in

    • Turns out, the suspicious packages were actually holding more of the Help Point systems being installed at the station

    • It was not immediately clear if it was the MTA or private engineers responsible for installing the devices

    At least the MTA knows their system works.

    Someone at the New Rochelle train station Monday afternoon saw something suspicious, so they followed the popular advice and said something. The person used one of the newly installed MTA Help Point intercom systems to report what they saw.

    Only problem? Those suspicious packages being reported were boxes holding more of the Help Point devices.

    The narrow, roughly 6-foot-tall boxes contained the systems being installed at the Metro-North station. After briefly shutting down part of the station just after 4 p.m. — right as the evening commute was set to begin — police were seen taking the boxes off the units standing upright along the platform.

    There were yellow packaging ties around the end of the boxes, which someone could’ve possibly mistaken for wires.

    It was not immediately clear if it was the MTA or private engineers responsible for installing the devices. It also was not clear why train or station officials wouldn’t be able to immediately know that the boxes were not suspicious.

    Because the situation was resolved so quickly, there was virtually no disruption in service along the train line.

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