Happening Today: Sean Hannity, Opioids, Kendrick Lamar, Harry Anderson - NBC New York

Happening Today: Sean Hannity, Opioids, Kendrick Lamar, Harry Anderson

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    What to Know

    • Michael Cohen, Trump's personal attorney, was forced to reveal a secret — that he had also done legal work for Fox News host Sean Hannity

    • Within Trump's plan to combat opioid abuse, overshadowed by his call for the death penalty, is a push to expand the use to treat addiction

    • Kendrick Lamar has won the Pulitzer Prize for music, making history as the first non-classical or jazz artist to win the prestigious prize

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    Trump Lawyer Forced to Reveal Another Client: Sean Hannity

    A legal fight over what should happen to records the FBI seized from President Trump's personal attorney took a surprise twist when the lawyer, Michael Cohen, was forced to reveal a secret — that he had also done legal work for Fox News host Sean Hannity. The disclosure came as a New York judge disappointed a lawyer for Trump by letting prosecutors proceed with the cataloguing of evidence including multiple electronic devices that were seized in raids while a system is set up to ensure that records protected by attorney-client privilege aren't disclosed to investigators. Lawyers for Cohen and prosecutors both had reason to claim success after three hours of arguments before U.S. District Judge Kimba Wood, who said she may appoint a special master, a neutral lawyer, to help decide which materials should stay confidential. Wood denied a request by Trump's lawyer, Joanna Hendon, that the president and Cohen get the first crack at designating which documents should be off-limits to investigators. Hannity's name emerged after the judge pressed Cohen to divulge the names of the clients he's worked with since the 2016 election, whose privileged communications might be contained within his files. Cohen's legal team said he had just three clients in 2017 and 2018.

    Sacramento Police Release New Video Following Fatal Shooting

    Sacramento police released 54 new video and audio clips that add fresh details about the department's response following the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man. The March shooting of Stephon Clark, 22, sparked an outcry in California's capital city and became the latest flashpoint in a national conversation about police shootings of young black men. The police were responding to calls of someone breaking car windows. They said they thought Clark had a gun, but he was unarmed. The new clips show several officers muting their microphones when they begin speaking with others and two officers administering CPR on Clark's motionless body more than five minutes after the shooting. They include dashboard and body camera footage from officers arriving after the shooting, audio from two 911 calls and more video from a Sacramento County Sheriff's Department helicopter. At least three new body camera videos show responding officers asking whether others have muted their microphones, a move that could spark fresh criticism of the department. The two officers who shot Clark muted their microphones several minutes after. The department now bans officers from turning off or muting cameras in most instances.

    Increase Medication-Based Treatment for Opioids, Feds Say

    Deep within President Trump's plan to combat opioid abuse, overshadowed by his call for the death penalty for some drug traffickers, is a push to expand the use of medication to treat addiction. It's a rare instance in which Trump isn't trying roll back Obama administration policies, and where fractious Republicans and Democrats in Congress have come together. Trump declared last month that "we're making medically assisted treatment more available and affordable," even as Congress was working to approve $1 billion for a new treatment grant program for opioids as part of the massive spending bill to keep the government running. Not to offer such treatment for opioid addiction is like "trying to treat an infection without antibiotics," new Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar told the National Governors Association earlier this year. Experts have long argued that medication-assisted treatment should be the standard of care for people addicted to heroin and other opioid drugs. But acceptance lags.

    Kendrick Lamar 1st Rapper to Win Pulitzer Prize for Music

    Kendrick Lamar has won the Pulitzer Prize for music, making history as the first non-classical or jazz artist to win the prestigious prize. The revered rapper is also the most commercially successful musician to receive the award, usually reserved for critically acclaimed classical acts who don't live on the pop charts. The 30-year-old won the prize for "DAMN.," his raw and powerful Grammy-winning album. The Pulitzer board the album is a "virtuosic song collection" and said it captures "the modern African American life." He will win $15,000. Lamar has been lauded for his deep lyrical content, politically charged live performances, and his profound mix of hip-hop, spoken word, jazz, soul, funk, poetry and African sounds. Since emerging on the music scene with the 2011 album "Section.80," he has achieved the perfect mix of commercial appeal and critical respect. The Pulitzer board has awarded special honors to Bob Dylan, Duke Ellington, George Gershwin, Thelonious Monk, John Coltrane and Hank Williams, but a popular figure like Lamar has never won the prize for music. In 1997, Wynton Marsalis became the first jazz act to win the Pulitzer Prize for music.

    Actor Harry Anderson, Star of “Night Court,” Dies at 65

    Harry Anderson, the actor best known for playing an off-the-wall judge working the night shift of a Manhattan court room in the television comedy series "Night Court," was found dead in his North Carolina home. Anderson was 65. A statement from the Asheville Police Department said officers responded to a call from Anderson's home and found him dead. The statement said foul play is not suspected. On "Night Court," Anderson played Judge Harry T. Stone, a young jurist who professed his love for singer Mel Torme, actress Jean Harlow, magic tricks and his collection of art-deco ties. He also starred in the series "Dave's World" and appeared on "Cheers" as con man Harry 'The Hat' Gittes. Anderson prided himself on being a magician as well as actor.

    Khloe Kardashian Reveals Daughter's Name

    The truth is out there... so to speak. Khloe Kardashian took to Instagram to reveal her baby girl's name... True Thompson. "Our little girl, True Thompson, has completely stolen our hearts and we are overwhelmed with LOVE. Such a blessing to welcome this angel into the family! Mommy and Daddy loooooove you True!" Along with the name reveal, Khloe shared an image of a fully decked-out room filled with pink flowers and pink balloons. Kardashian gave birth last week. The happy event came on the heels of Kardashian's partner, Cleveland Cavalier Tristan Thompson, finding himself embroiled in a cheating scandal.

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