Coronavirus

NYC’s 2020 Summer Youth Employment Program Suspended Due to COVID-19

NBC Universal, Inc.

What to Know

  • New York City's 2020 Summer Youth Employment Program (SYEP) has been cancelled due to the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak.
  • The SYEP, which has been an institution since 1963, is the nation’s largest summer youth employment program, connecting low-income city youth between the ages of 14 and 24 with career exploration opportunities and paid work experience
  • SYEP sees tens of thousands of participants each year

New York City's 2020 Summer Youth Employment Program (SYEP) has been cancelled due to the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak.

The SYEP, which has been an institution since 1963, is the country’s largest summer youth employment program, connecting low-income city youth between the ages of 14 and 24 with career exploration opportunities and paid work experience. SYEP sees tens of thousands of participants each year.

"The City has had to make some tough choices about whether programs should remain open or closed or be modified to ensure the health and safety of New Yorkers. Out of an abundance of caution for our young people, providers and worksites, we have made the very difficult decision not to operate the Summer Youth Employment Program this year," Bill Chong, Commissioner of the NYC Department of Youth and Community Development, said in an internal memo obtained by News 4.

The memo goes on to say that due to the uncertainty regarding how the virus will continue "to affect social distancing guidelines, worksite availability, and provider and site staffing as we head into late spring and summer makes it difficult to ensure" the program can operate safely and efficiently.

"While the cancellation of this summer’s SYEP will be disappointing to its participants, making this announcement now rather than later will allow young people and their families to make more informed decisions on alternative summer plans," Chong said in the memo.

Christine Quinn, the president and CEO of Win, which provides shelter and services to women and families in the city, called it an "outrage...cruel and short-sighted" that the program was being suspended, and pushed for it to be postponed to later in the summer.

"Nearly 200 young people living in Win shelters were expecting job offers this summer. What will they do now?" said Quinn, adding that the cut only adds to the "pain and uncertainty" vulnerable families are currently dealing with.

Copyright NBC New York
Contact Us