Coronavirus

10 NJ Universities Join Forces, Want Students to Return to State for Higher Education

"It’s time to think about coming home," the presidents of the participating colleges and universities wrote in a joint statement.

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Some New Jersey colleges have launched a bid to lure students home and help them recover from the outbreak. What exactly are they offering? Gaby Acevedo reports.

What to Know

  • The presidents of 10 public universities and colleges in New Jersey have joined forces and issued a call for the 120,000 state residents who attend higher education institutions outside of the state to return home, enroll in New Jersey institutions, and help rebuild the state
  • As New Jersey continues to deal with the ongoing COVID-19 health crisis, the initiative aims to bring bright and talented young people back to the state to help rebuild its businesses, non-profits, schools and health system
  • New Jersey is the nation's second-most impacted state, reporting on Tuesday a total of 130,593 cases and 8,244 deaths statewide

The presidents of 10 public universities and colleges in New Jersey have joined forces and issued a call for the 120,000 state residents who attend higher education institutions outside of the state to return home, enroll in New Jersey institutions, and help rebuild the state as a part of a new New Jersey Scholar Corps.

The participating four-year institutions in the NJ Come Home Program are Montclair State University, the New Jersey Institute of Technology, Rowan University, Kean University, New Jersey City University, Ramapo College, Stockton University, The College of New Jersey, Thomas Edison State University, and William Paterson University.

As part of the new initiative, the participating higher education institutions will accept credits earned with a grade of C or better from an accredited out-of-state college or university.

Additionally, the institutions also promise access to financial aid programs offered by the state and the institution of higher education, a rapid application review and will offer guaranteed housing based on the availability at the time the student commits to attending the institution.

The group also highlights that the transfer may be of financial benefit to students, since tuition "may be lower than attending an out-of-state institution."

An estimated 33,000 New Jersey residents leave annually to attend an out-of-state college or university.

"It’s time to think about coming home," the presidents of the participating colleges and universities wrote in a joint statement.

New Jersey is the nation's second-most COVID-19 impacted state, reporting on Tuesday a total of 130,593 coronavirus cases and 8,244 deaths statewide. As New Jersey continues to deal with the ongoing health crisis, the initiative aims to bring bright and talented young people back to the state to help rebuild its businesses, non-profits, schools and health system.

“New Jersey needs your energy, your intelligence, and your commitment,” the joint statement says.

“This is an unprecedented period in our history, a time that calls for everyday heroes to show up and give back. Think of the Peace Corps and AmeriCorps. Think of those natural disasters and crises when young people turned out to fight for what’s right, to push us toward a hopeful future," the letter goes on to say.

The New Jersey Scholar Corps will also provide students with volunteer opportunities to serve their local communities, while gaining professional experience and building their networks.

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