New American History Exhibit to Showcase Similarities Between Dinosaurs, Birds

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Scientists have long known about the link between dinosaurs and the birds of the modern era, but long-standing exhibits at museums around the world haven't portrayed the link. That's about to change at at least one New York City venue, though. The American Museum of Natural History is set to showcase the similarities between birds and the pre-historic creatures at a new exhibit called "Dinosaurs Among Us," which will run from April 12 to Jan. 2 and will showcase what paleontologists have learned about the connections between dinosaurs and birds.

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American Museum of Natural History
The exhibit will showcase smaller dinosaurs that walked on two feet and likely flew.n
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n"What's new here is that all our modern technology tell us more than we thought we could ever know about the connections between dinosaurs and birds," said Mark Norrell, the museum's paleontology curator.n
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Here's some of what you can expect at the exhibit when it opens next month.
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American Museum of Natural History
As well as being interesting and informative, there are various aspects of the exhibit that are interactive. Exhibition visitors can explore the dinosaur world even further with a media interactive called “Will It Fly?" By varying the wings, breastbone, and body size, visitors can build eight different dinosaurs.
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American Museum of Natural History
Exhibition visitors can climb into a full-scale model of a nest with 20 eggs discovered in China , likely laid by one of the largest oviraptorosaurs ever found, Gigantoraptor.
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American Museum of Natural History
This bird, Paracoracias Occidentalis, closely resembles modern-day birds called rollers that live mostly in the tropics. The fossils of this bird were found in Green River Wyoming and lived around 50 million years ago, in an age when Wyoming was warm and swampy.
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American Museum of Natural History
The Psittacosaur, is a small horned dinosaur whose name means "parrot lizard." This dinosaur has a parrot-like beak, and feathery fibers along it's tail. The fibers found on it's tail are an early stage of feather evolution also found on many other dinosaurs.
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American Museum of Natural History
This fossil depicts a recently hatched animal on top of the eggs of what would have been its nest mates. The tiny animal is a troodontid, which is a group of small, feathered, non-bird dinosaurs with large brains. The fossil was discovered in Mongolia.
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American Museum of Natural History
This is a fossil of the Kaan mckennai dinosaur. Scientists suspect the specimen on the left to be a male because of the structure underneath it's tail. Structures like these could have supported the muscles used in a tail-feather display, much like those still put on by birds like the peacock.
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American Museum of Natural History
This is a cast of a Citipati osmolskae specimen with spread wings, protecting it's eggs. The fossil for this cast was found in Mongolia's Gobi desert by Museum scientists.
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American Museum of Natural History
Pictured above is the Yutyrannus huali which means "beautiful feathered tyrant." It's shaggy coat is made of "proto-feathers." Weighing 1.5 tons it was formidable predator, like it's relative the T. rex. This specimen was discovered in China In 2012.
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American Museum of Natural History
Don't be fooled by this dinosaur's wings, despite feathers similar to those of modern birds the Sinornithosaurus millennii could not fly. This species was discovered by Chinese and American Museum of Natural History scientists.
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