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EU leaders will see Britain quitting as a dangerous precedent and a potentially fatal blow to the European project. Some face growing euroskepticism from their own citizens and may feel the need to make a strong case domestically for why the now-27-nation bloc has a future.

This could lead to reforms of how the EU works. Future negotiations may be overshadowed by a sense of betrayal and the feeling that an example needs to be made of the U.K. to discourage others from leaving too. The fallout could also hit Europe's fragile growth.

EU leaders will see Britain quitting as a dangerous precedent and a potentially fatal blow to the European project. Some face growing euroskepticism from their own citizens and may feel the need to make a strong case domestically for why the now-27-nation bloc has a future.

Germany's Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble recently said that "it would be a miracle if a withdrawal of Britain would come without economic disadvantages." On the other hand, a British exit, or Brexit, could spur the European Union into action. Since joining the club in 1973, Britain has shaped the bloc mainly by putting the brakes on the drive toward ever-closer political union, a project that could now be revived with gusto.

EU leaders will see Britain quitting as a dangerous precedent and a potentially fatal blow to the European project. Some face growing euroskepticism from their own citizens and may feel the need to make a strong case domestically for why the now-27-nation bloc has a future.

COULD LAWMAKERS DECIDE TO IGNORE THE PROCESS?

EU leaders will see Britain quitting as a dangerous precedent and a potentially fatal blow to the European project. Some face growing euroskepticism from their own citizens and may feel the need to make a strong case domestically for why the now-27-nation bloc has a future.

Britain's referendum doesn't automatically trigger an exit from the European Union, which has led a few commentators to suggest that lawmakers might simply decide to ignore or slow-ball the process. So could they? "In legal theory that is possible. In practice that is absolutely not possible," said Alan Renwick, the deputy director of the Constitution Unit at University College London. "If there is a vote for Brexit then on Friday the PM will indicate how the process of Brexit will begin."

EU leaders will see Britain quitting as a dangerous precedent and a potentially fatal blow to the European project. Some face growing euroskepticism from their own citizens and may feel the need to make a strong case domestically for why the now-27-nation bloc has a future.

THE WAY FORWARD MAY NOT BE STRAIGHTFORWARD

EU leaders will see Britain quitting as a dangerous precedent and a potentially fatal blow to the European project. Some face growing euroskepticism from their own citizens and may feel the need to make a strong case domestically for why the now-27-nation bloc has a future.

The result will trigger a new series of negotiations as Britain and the EU search for a way to separate economies that h163219986ave become intertwined since the U.K. joined the bloc on Jan. 1, 1973. Under Article 50 of the Treaty of European Union, talks would likely last two years, with the possibility for extension if all of the remaining 27 EU nations agree.

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Noah Syndergaard
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But the clock starts ticking only when the U.K. notifies the EU that it wants a divorce — and some on the "leave" side have suggested that this won't occur until 2018. However, the EU may not accept a delayed exit. "U.K. negotiations with the European Union will prove difficult, given that EU leaders will not want to set a precedent for an easy withdrawal for other countries that could reconsider their status, such as Denmark," said Howard Archer of IHS, a research firm.

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Lionel Messi
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No matter what, the EU will face issues. Alongside economic woes, troubles with Greece and the inability to agree on how to manage a refugee emergency, a British exit would deepen Europe's existential crisis.

EU leaders will see Britain quitting as a dangerous precedent and a potentially fatal blow to the European project. Some face growing euroskepticism from their own citizens and may feel the need to make a strong case domestically for why the now-27-nation bloc has a future.

This could lead to reforms of how the EU works. Future negotiations may be overshadowed by a sense of betrayal and the feeling that an example needs to be made of the U.K. to discourage others from leaving too. The fallout could also hit Europe's fragile growth.

EU leaders will see Britain quitting as a dangerous precedent and a potentially fatal blow to the European project. Some face growing euroskepticism from their own citizens and may feel the need to make a strong case domestically for why the now-27-nation bloc has a future.

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Germany's Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble recently said that "it would be a miracle if a withdrawal of Britain would come without economic disadvantages." On the other hand, a British exit, or Brexit, could spur the European Union into action. Since joining the club in 1973, Britain has shaped the bloc mainly by putting the brakes on the drive toward ever-closer political union, a project that could now be revived with gusto.

EU leaders will see Britain quitting as a dangerous precedent and a potentially fatal blow to the European project. Some face growing euroskepticism from their own citizens and may feel the need to make a strong case domestically for why the now-27-nation bloc has a future.

COULD LAWMAKERS DECIDE TO IGNORE THE PROCESS?

EU leaders will see Britain quitting as a dangerous precedent and a potentially fatal blow to the European project. Some face growing euroskepticism from their own citizens and may feel the need to make a strong case domestically for why the now-27-nation bloc has a future.

Britain's referendum doesn't automatically trigger an exit from the European Union, which has led a few commentators to suggest that lawmakers might simply decide to ignore or slow-ball the process. So could they? "In legal theory that is possible. In practice that is absolutely not possible," said Alan Renwick, the deputy director of the Constitution Unit at University College London. "If there is a vote for Brexit then on Friday the PM will indicate how the process of Brexit will begin."

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'Tonight’: Tweets Recounting Getting Fired'Tonight’: Tweets Recounting Getting FiredHost Jimmy Fallon reads his favorite tweets with the hashtag #HowIGotFired. (Published Friday, June 24, 2016)

THE WAY FORWARD MAY NOT BE STRAIGHTFORWARD

EU leaders will see Britain quitting as a dangerous precedent and a potentially fatal blow to the European project. Some face growing euroskepticism from their own citizens and may feel the need to make a strong case domestically for why the now-27-nation bloc has a future.

The result will trigger a new series of negotiations as Britain and the EU search for a way to separate economies that have become intertwined since the U.K. joined the bloc on Jan. 1, 1973. Under Article 50 of the Treaty of European Union, talks would likely last two years, with the possibility for extension if all of the remaining 27 EU nations agree.

EU leaders will see Britain quitting as a dangerous precedent and a potentially fatal blow to the European project. Some face growing euroskepticism from their own citizens and may feel the need to make a strong case domestically for why the now-27-nation bloc has a future.

This could lead to reforms of how the EU works. Future negotiations may be overshadowed by a sense of betrayal and the feeling that an example needs to be made of the U.K. to discourage others from leaving too. The fallout could also hit Europe's fragile growth.

EU leaders will see Britain quitting as a dangerous precedent and a potentially fatal blow to the European project. Some face growing euroskepticism from their own citizens and may feel the need to make a strong case domestically for why the now-27-nation bloc has a future.

Germany's Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble recently said that "it would be a miracle if a withdrawal of Britain would come without economic disadvantages." On the other hand, a British exit, or Brexit, could spur the European Union into action. Since joining the club in 1973, Britain has shaped the bloc mainly by putting the brakes on the drive toward ever-closer political union, a project that could now be revived with gusto.

EU leaders will see Britain quitting as a dangerous precedent and a potentially fatal blow to the European project. Some face growing euroskepticism from their own citizens and may feel the need to make a strong case domestically for why the now-27-nation bloc has a future.

COULD LAWMAKERS DECIDE TO IGNORE THE PROCESS?

EU leaders will see Britain quitting as a dangerous precedent and a potentially fatal blow to the European project. Some face growing euroskepticism from their own citizens and may feel the need to make a strong case domestically for why the now-27-nation bloc has a future.

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Britain's referendum doesn't automatically trigger an exit from the European Union, which has led a few commentators to suggest that lawmakers might simply decide to ignore or slow-ball the process. So could they? "In legal theory that is possible. In practice that is absolutely not possible," said Alan Renwick, the deputy director of the Constitution Unit at University College London. "If there is a vote for Brexit then on Friday the PM will indicate how the process of Brexit will begin."

EU leaders will see Britain quitting as a dangerous precedent and a potentially fatal blow to the European project. Some face growing euroskepticism from their own citizens and may feel the need to make a strong case domestically for why the now-27-nation bloc has a future.

THE WAY FORWARD MAY NOT BE STRAIGHTFORWARD

EU leaders will see Britain quitting as a dangerous precedent and a potentially fatal blow to the European project. Some face growing euroskepticism from their own citizens and may feel the need to make a strong case domestically for why the now-27-nation bloc has a future.

This is a centered video.

Man With Swastika-Painted Golf Balls Interrupts TrumpMan With Swastika-Painted Golf Balls Interrupts TrumpA man with swastika-painted golf balls interrupted Donald Trump in Scotland, where the presumptive Republican presidential nominee was attending the reopening ceremony of his golf course there. The man held up red golf balls painted with swastikas before he was escorted out of the area. As Trump spoke, the balls still littered the ground around him. U.K. media identified the man as a British comedian who has pranked celebrities and officials in the past. (Published Friday, June 24, 2016)

The result will trigger a new series of negotiations as Britain and the EU search for a way to separate economies that have become intertwined since the U.K. joined the bloc on Jan. 1, 1973. Under Article 50 of the Treaty of European Union, talks would likely last two years, with the possibility for extension if all of the remaining 27 EU nations agree.