Counter Intelligence: "Bye, Bye Birdie" Too Risque for B'Way

"Birdie" scene too racy for Great White Way

Monday, Aug 24, 2009  |  Updated 12:00 PM EDT
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Counter Intelligence: "Bye, Bye Birdie" Too Risque for B'Way

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Gina Gershon, who stars in the upcoming revival of "Bye Bye Birdie," said the play had to cut out a dance scene that had been included in its production since 1960.

See why the production is too risque and take a look at our list of must-reads that will have you chatting at the lunch counter, over IM or wherever it is that people actually talk these days.

  • Gina Gershon, who stars in the upcoming revival of "Bye Bye Birdie," said the play had to cut out a racy dance scene that had been included in its production since 1960. Gerson's character, Rose, shows up at a banquet, flirts and canoodles with guys underneath and on the table. But the scene, as one critic put it, "seemed a little too gang rape-y." 
     
  • Decreased air travel means fewer delays -- making this summer one of the smoothest in years.  The number of flight delays this summer has fallen at the nation's 35 largest commercial airports. Traffic fell 9% this year compared to last but delays of longer than two hours for May, June and July had plummeted by more than 25% over the past two years.  
     
  • Peat bogs in Ireland are notorious for harboring some pretty bizarre objects. A list has been made of some of the more far-out trinkets found in the muck, including intact bodies, thousand-year-old "bog butter" and murder weapons (natch). One of the bodies pulled from the muck lived around 300 BC. The bogs were also the site of ritual slayings back in the day.
     
  • Americans are more lonely than ever, according to a new study. The number of people who said there was no one they'd discuss important matters with tripled between 1985 and 2004 -- to 25 percent. Experts also said the degree of loneliness also affects how well individuals sleep and whether they'll feel depressed in a year from now. 
     
  • Texts sent to a secret lovers can now be used as evidence against philandering partners during divorce proceedings in France. The e-missives are claimed to be legitimate proof of adultery and will make getting a divorce in the country much easier, experts said. Typically, divorcing spouses must wait years to end bad marriages without proof of mistreatment.

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