What Should You Do in Case of Nuclear Attack? ‘Don’t Run. Get Inside,’ Experts Say - NBC New York
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What Should You Do in Case of Nuclear Attack? ‘Don’t Run. Get Inside,’ Experts Say

Local officials in Southern California have already been campaigning to be ready for a nuclear attack since 2013

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    NEWSLETTERS

    North Korea's latest threat to target Guam prompted this reaction overnight from the governor of the U.S. territory. "I want to reassure the people of Guam that currently there is no threat to our island," Gov. Eddie Baza Calvo said. President Donald Trump earlier said to North Korea, "They will be met with fire, fury and frankly power, the likes of which this world has never seen before." (Published Wednesday, Aug. 9, 2017)

    North Korea's consistent nuclear bravado over the last few months has given American emergency response planners reason to prepare the public for a possible nuclear attack, NBC News reported in April.

    Their simplest warning is this: "Don’t run. Get inside." The best shelter would offer layers of protection, like dirt, walls and concrete, to prevent direct exposure to radiation that comes after a nuclear blast.

    There's federally sanctioned nuclear safety directives available at Ready.gov, though they have not been widely shared. The FEMA and Department of Homeland Security-run site recommends staying inside for at least a day, unless authorities advise otherwise.

    Local officials in Southern California have already been campaigning to be ready for a nuclear attack since 2013, offering an 18-page educational pamphlet, four videos and a school curriculum, all with the message, "Get inside, stay inside, stay tuned," according to the public health medical director who led the effort.

    Tillerson on North Korea: Americans Should Sleep Well at Night

    [NATL] Tillerson on North Korea: Americans Should Sleep Well at Night

    Secretary of State Rex Tillerson urged calm and said Americans should have "no concerns" after North Korea and President Donald Trump traded fiery threats, insisting Wednesday he doesn't believe there is "any imminent threat."

    (Published Wednesday, Aug. 9, 2017)