How to Help Calm Anxious Pets During Fireworks Shows | NBC New York
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How to Help Calm Anxious Pets During Fireworks Shows

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    NEWSLETTERS

    The Fourth of July fireworks may be fun for those of us on two legs, but for a lot of four-legged friends out there, it's not the same story. The loud noise from fireworks shows during the holiday can often cause serious anxiety for pets and can even send some running out of fear. (Published Sunday, July 3, 2016)

    The Fourth of July fireworks may be fun for those of us on two legs, but for a lot of four-legged friends out there, it's not the same story. 

    The loud noise from fireworks shows during the holiday can often cause serious anxiety for pets and can even send some running out of fear.

    Cate McManus with Dallas Animal Services said it’s common to see a rush the day after the yearly Fourth of July display as their already packed shelter takes on even more pets that got away from home.

    “When animals just freak out from fireworks, they get out of fences or break down doors," she said. "I mean some dogs really go to extremes to get away — they’re so scared."

    There are a lot of options available to deal with the anxiety such as wearable options, while others include herbal or over-the-counter pills offered at pet stores.

    Last May, when Southlake veterinarian Dr. Tom Holbrook was seeing similar anxiety from dogs during thunderstorms, he showed NBC 5 a new medication being prescribed to dogs during such situations called Sileo.

    "You put it in the cheek and gums,” said Holbrook. “Just put the syringe right in the gum right there and just squirt so many dots, and the dots are on the syringe itself."

    The fast acting gel calms the pet and wears off after just a few hours. Holbrook’s office warns that it does require a checkup and prescription from your local vet to get the gel.

    McManus said her best advice for avoiding problems during the fireworks is to keep your animals indoors and comfortable in a spot where they feel safe.

    “Keeping them confined, well confined, certainly with a collar and tags on just in case,” she said.

    If you do come across a stray after the fireworks, local animal services leaders ask that you contact them right away so that they can work to get that pet back home.

    More than 53,000 pets were adopted through the 2016 Clear the Shelters campaign, a nationwide push to place deserving animals in forever homes. Join the conversation on social media using #ClearTheShelters.