American University of Afghanistan in Kabul Will Reopen After Attack | NBC New York
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American University of Afghanistan in Kabul Will Reopen After Attack

Fourteen people were killed and 48 injured in the attack



    Afghan security forces stand guard after an attack on the American University of Afghanistan in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Aug. 25, 2016. The attack has ended, a senior police officer said Thursday, after several people were killed. Kabul police Chief Abdul Rahman Rahimi said the dead included one guard, and that about 700 students had been rescued.

    The nonprofit that supports the American University of Afghanistan in Kabul said the school would reopen following the attack that killed 14 people on Wednesday, NBC News reported. 

    "AUAF is dedicated to its educational mission in service to Afghanistan and has no intention of giving into terror," the Friends of the American University in Afghanistan said in a statement, using an acronym for the learning institution. 

    Militants detonated a car bomb outside the university's gate and stormed the complex with guns in a 10-hour attack that ended Thursday morning. 

    Fourteen people — seven students, one professor, three police and two security officers — were killed. One attacker died in the car bomb blast and two militants were killed by police, authorities and a hospital official said. Forty-eight people were injured and taken to hospitals, according to a medical official.

    Baby Lemur Makes London Zoo Debut

    [NATL-DFW] Baby Lemur Makes London Zoo Debut

    London Zoo is welcoming the first ever baby aye-aye lemur just in time for Halloween.

    The creepy-looking creature was actually born on July 1 but has only emerged from its secluded nesting box for the first time this week.

    The species of lemur (formally known as Daubentonia madagascariensis) are unique in that they have an unusually large middle finger and are associated with doom in their native Madagascar. Natives there believe that if an aye-aye points its long finger at you, death is not far away.

    Zookeepers expressed their excitement at the birth although they only saw the baby recently as it has been hiding in its nest box.

    (Published 10 minutes ago)

    The university in Afghanistan is not affiliated with American University in Washington, D.C.