<![CDATA[NBC New York - Local News - Storm Team 4]]>Copyright 2017http://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/localen-usMon, 27 Mar 2017 09:26:37 -0400Mon, 27 Mar 2017 09:26:37 -0400NBC Local Integrated Media<![CDATA[Interactive Radar]]>http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/radar+monday+update.jpgTrack the weather with our interactive radar.]]><![CDATA[Forecast for Monday, March 27]]>Mon, 27 Mar 2017 05:16:54 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/AM+WEB+WX+032717+-+04461505_WNBC_000000015607109.jpg

Erica Grow's weather forecast for Monday, March 27.]]>
<![CDATA[Get Our Severe Weather Alerts on Your iPhone or iPad]]>Wed, 30 Sep 2015 14:36:50 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/lightning+new+york.jpg

Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[StormTracker 4: The Most Powerful Radar in the Tri-State]]>Thu, 09 Feb 2017 07:47:38 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/StormTracker+4.jpg

StormTracker 4, a radar so powerful it will see the storms behind the storms.

The state-of-the-art high-frequency S-band radar is online now, and its debut will bring NBC 4 viewers the best radar data available to the public. NBC 4 New York and Telemundo 47 are the first Northeast television stations licensed by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to operate in the high-frequency S-Band.

As a result, NBC 4 New York and Telemundo 47 viewers can access the most accurate and powerful broadcast weather technology anywhere in the Tri-State area.

StormTracker 4 is the:

Most Accurate: A dual-pol radar (meaning it scans both vertically and horizontally), StormTracker 4 can see storms down to the size of a drop of rain or snow flake. And because of its location, StormTracker 4 will have the best view of the sky conditions close to the ground in the New York tri-state area, where severe and winter weather happen.

Most Powerful: StormTracker 4 is a high-frequency S-band radar, of a type previously reserved for the military and the government. It is the only one of its kind in the tri-state area, which gives NBC 4 greater resolution and clarity than other radar products in the region.

Most Precise: There's no lag with StormTracker 4, no waiting for government data – StormTracker 4’s data is received by Storm Team 4 instantaneously, allowing us to warn you first during rapidly changing weather conditions.

Most Technological: StormTracker 4 is exclusive to NBC 4 New York, and will be complemented by our mobile radar StormRanger 4, our chase truck StormChaser 4 and one of the largest teams of meteorologists and weather experts in the region.

To activate StormTracker 4:

On Desktop:

  • Open a browser and navigate to the station’s weather page
  • If the interactive radar is not on the Weather Landing Page, then navigate to the Maps and Radar page from the sub-navigation at the top of the page
  • Scroll down on the page to the “Interactive Radar and Maps” content
  • In the bottom right corner of the interactive radar map, click on “Layers”
  • A fly-out menu will appear. Click on the StormTracker 4 layer icon
  • To close the menu, click on the “x” in the top right corner of the menu
  • When the menu closes, the StormTracker 4 radar layer will be active on the map

On Mobile Web:

  • Open a browser and navigate to the station’s weather page
  • Scroll to the bottom of the page and click the “Interactive Radar and Maps” menu option
  • In the bottom right corner of the radar map, click on the layers icon. This icon looks like 3 sheets of paper stacked on top of one another
  • A fly-out menu will appear. Click on the StormTracker 4 layer icon
  • To close the menu, click on the “x” in the top right corner. When the menu closes, the StormTracker radar layer will be active on the map

On Mobile Apps:

  • Open the app
  • If Weather is NOT set as the homepage, navigate to the weather page by tapping on the weather icon and temperature in the top right of the app header
  • Tap your finger on the gray arrow on the edge of the half moon map to expand the interactive radar
  • In the top right corner of the radar map, click on the layers icon. This icon looks like 3 sheets of paper stacked on top of one another
  • In the “Layers” section of the menu that appears, you will see an option for StormTracker 4
  • > On Android, click the checkbox next to StormTracker 4
  • > On iOS, tap the right edge of the StormTracker 4 menu item. This should place a blue checkmark next to StormTracker
  • To go back to the interactive radar map:
  • > On Android, click the back arrow in the top left corner of the menu
  • > On iOS click the “Done” button in the top right corner of the menu
  • When the menu closes, the StormTracker radar layer will be active on the map

]]>
<![CDATA[What to Expect: Hourly, 7-Day Forecasts]]>Wed, 25 May 2016 12:24:05 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/storm-team-4.jpgCheck out Storm Team 4's forecasts for the day and week. ]]><![CDATA[StormRanger 4: Pinpoint Local Weather Forecasts]]>Wed, 07 Dec 2016 14:18:25 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/stormrangerrain.jpg

NBC 4 New York’s exclusive StormRanger 4 mobile radar truck is a one-of-a-kind vehicle that has a live, high-powered Doppler radar enabling it to get out ahead of a storm. StormRanger 4 can track storms wherever they are with a higher degree of accuracy and more detail than ever before.

From increased visibility in the heart of a storm to the ability to alert people in real time that a tornado has touched down, StormRanger 4 is the latest addition to NBC 4 New York’s expanding weather arsenal designed to keep you and your family safe when severe weather strikes.

"This radar technology and mobile configuration is a first for any TV station or network of stations in the U.S.," said Richard Stedronsky, a meteorologist and director of strategic business development and partnerships at Enterprise Electronics Corp. "NBC-Telemundo is the first to deploy this fleet of mobile doppler radars in the nation."

So what makes StormRanger 4 so unique in delivering you the most accurate forecast?

When severe weather approaches, NBC 4 New York now has the ability to dispatch StormRanger 4 to wherever the storm is going to strike. Using X-band, dual-polarization Doppler radar, StormRanger 4 can provide our meteorologists with more detailed observations than any normal fixed radar can provide, giving them — and you — a hyperlocal look at the storm.

See StormRanger radar in action here »

"When you start to get over 100 miles away from the radar, the radar beam from a fixed radar is too high in the atmosphere to see lower weather phenomena,” said Stedronsky, whose company provides the new radar system in StormRanger 4. "But that’s where severe weather takes place -- in the lowest parts of the atmosphere. With StormRanger, you can take your viewers to the weather and gather information that a traditional fixed radar could be missing.”

StormRanger 4's radar, which has a maximum range of about 100 miles, will update about once every 60 seconds. These updates mean you'll be up-to-the-minute when tracking how and when the weather will impact you in your crucial locations. Our app users will receive push alerts when StormRanger 4 is activated, allowing them to get a closer -- and more accurate -- look at the weather in their neighborhoods.

By driving StormRanger 4 close to actual storms, NBC 4 New York will be able to give the kind of detailed look that TV stations never have been able to do before. Fixed radars may miss certain weather events due to terrain or blockages due to buildings in a downtown area. But StormRanger 4 can fill in those gaps in coverage, and in turn provide a more complete picture of what is happening now and what those immediately in the crosshairs of a severe storm can expect.

Mobility is StormRanger 4’s big advantage over fixed radar during severe thunderstorms. By positioning StormRanger 4 wherever severe storms are about to strike, meteorologists will get a better idea of how the storms are forming, how severe they are and where and how fast they’re moving.

"This advanced look that you’ll get from a StormRanger means you’re giving more accurate and timely information to a viewer,” Stedronsky said.

Get 10-day and hourly forecasts here »

In addition to radar, StormRanger 4 has two cameras to give you an up-close look at conditions - one on the dashboard, and one pointed at a reporter riding in the vehicle.

"We are boosting our weather forecasting capabilities by building, from scratch, the first-of-its-kind fleet of mobile weather radars in the country because we know how important weather is to our viewers," said Valari Staab, President, NBCUniversal Owned Television Stations. "All of our stations will have access to this groundbreaking weather technology so they can deliver even more lifesaving weather information to their communities."

See how you can view StormRanger 4 online »

Stedronsky says the key to it all is having full control of a mobile radar unit that can be sent to any storm, at any time.

“That’s going to be huge for protecting people and assets and saving lives,” Stedronsky said.

NBC 4 New York is committed to bringing you the most accurate weather information possible, and StormRanger 4 is just the latest investment we’re making into weather-related technologies to do just that. StormRanger 4 is here to serve your community, and ensure that Storm Team 4 is your most-trusted source when severe storms strike.


This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
<![CDATA[Check School Closings, Delays]]>Mon, 02 Feb 2015 17:47:31 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/school-bus-generic722.jpgCheck school closings and delays here.

Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Forecast for Monday, March 27]]>Sun, 26 Mar 2017 23:52:53 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC+LATE+EVE+WEB+WX+032617+-+00015709_WNBC_000000015604349.jpg

Janice Huff's weather forecast for Monday, March 27.]]>
<![CDATA[Forecast for March 26th.]]>Sun, 26 Mar 2017 10:05:25 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015598961_1200x675_906677315770.jpgErica Grow's forecast for March 26th.]]><![CDATA[Forecast for Saturday, March 25th]]>Sat, 25 Mar 2017 07:38:31 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015594910_1200x675_906331203681.jpg

Raphael Miranda's morning forecast for Saturday, March 25, 2017.]]>
<![CDATA[Evening Forecast for Friday March 24, 2017]]>Fri, 24 Mar 2017 19:27:11 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015592765_1200x675_906026563956.jpg

Janice Huff's forecast for March 24.]]>
<![CDATA[Forecast for Friday, March 24]]>Fri, 24 Mar 2017 05:18:17 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/EARLYAMWEBWX032417+-+04453107_WNBC_000000015581625.jpg

Raphael Miranda's weather forecast for Friday, March 24. ]]>
<![CDATA[Weather Forecast for Friday, March 24]]>Thu, 23 Mar 2017 23:55:53 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC+LATE+EVE+WEB+WX+032317+-+00014521_WNBC_000000015578791.jpg

Janice Huff's weather forecast for Friday, March 23.]]>
<![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Thursday March 23, 2017]]>Thu, 23 Mar 2017 19:21:21 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015577693_1200x675_905125443638.jpg

Janice Huff's forecast for March 23.]]>
<![CDATA[Forecast for Thursday, March 23]]>Thu, 23 Mar 2017 05:07:18 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/AM+WEB+WX+032317+-+04453403_WNBC_000000015559700.jpg

Chris Cimino's weather forecast for Thursday, March 23.]]>
<![CDATA[Forecast for Thursday, March 22]]>Thu, 23 Mar 2017 00:12:34 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC+LATE+EVE+WEB+WX+032217+-+00011607_WNBC_000000015557018.jpg

Janice Huff's weather forecast for Thursday, March 22.]]>
<![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Wednesday March 22, 2017]]>Wed, 22 Mar 2017 19:02:26 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015555681_1200x675_904224323983.jpg

Janice Huff's forecast for March 22.]]>
<![CDATA[Forecast for Wednesday, March 22nd]]>Wed, 22 Mar 2017 05:20:42 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/AM+WEB+WX+032217+-+04462700_WNBC_000000015542660.jpg

Chris Cimino's weather forecast for Wednesday, March 22. ]]>
<![CDATA[Forecast for Wednesday, March 22]]>Wed, 22 Mar 2017 00:34:58 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC+LATE+EVE+WEB+WX+032117+-+00011701_WNBC_000000015540084.jpg

Janice Huff's weather forecast for Wednesday, March 22.]]>
<![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Tuesday March 21, 2017]]>Tue, 21 Mar 2017 19:16:57 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015538717_1200x675_903278147522.jpg

Janice Huff's forecast for March 21.]]>
<![CDATA[Forecast for Tuesday, March 21]]>Tue, 21 Mar 2017 05:08:31 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/AM+WEB+WX+032117+-+04453921_WNBC_000000015527163.jpg

Chris Cimino's weather forecast for Tuesday, March 21. ]]>
<![CDATA[Forecast for Tuesday March 21]]>Mon, 20 Mar 2017 23:51:59 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC+LATE+EVE+WEB+WX+032017+-+00012622_WNBC_000000015524495.jpg

Janice Huff's weather forecast for Tuesday, March 20.]]>
<![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Monday March 20, 2017]]>Mon, 20 Mar 2017 20:34:40 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015523355_1200x675_902429251518.jpg

Janice Huff's forecast for March 20.]]>
<![CDATA[Forecast for March 20th]]>Mon, 20 Mar 2017 20:28:08 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015517130_1200x675_902085187988.jpg

Dave Price's forecast for March 20th.]]>
<![CDATA[Forecast for Monday, March 20]]>Mon, 20 Mar 2017 05:11:11 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/weather76.jpg

Chris Cimino's weather forecast for Monday, March 20.]]>
<![CDATA[Forecast for Monday, March 20]]>Sun, 19 Mar 2017 23:53:15 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC+LATE+EVE+WEB+WX+031917+-+00010818_WNBC_000000015509141.jpg

Raphael Miranda's weather forecast for Monday, March 20]]>
<![CDATA[Storm Team 4's Weekend Forecast]]>Sun, 19 Mar 2017 07:59:22 -0400

Raphael Miranda’s forecast for March 19th.]]>
<![CDATA[Forecast for Saturday, March 18th]]>Sat, 18 Mar 2017 10:47:31 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015501176_1200x675_901139523603.jpg

Raphael Miranda's midday forecast for Saturday, March 18, 2017.]]>
<![CDATA[Forecast for Saturday, March 18th]]>Sat, 18 Mar 2017 07:49:21 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015500591_1200x675_901077571604.jpg

Raphael Miranda's morning forecast for Saturday, March 18, 2017.]]>
<![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Friday March 17, 2017]]>Fri, 17 Mar 2017 20:20:43 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015498272_1200x675_900811843695.jpg

Janice Huff's forecast for March 17.]]>
<![CDATA[Days Before Spring, Winter May Hit Tri-State With More Snow]]>Fri, 17 Mar 2017 23:13:29 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/17358771_1034707596674059_3407096940485584756_o.png

Two separate wintry systems are expected to pound much of the tri-state with rain and snow this weekend, and Storm Team 4 says there's a chance residents in some spots could wake up to 3 new inches -- or more -- of the white stuff Sunday morning. 

The unsettled weather is expected to begin overnight, with rain and snow showers moving in just before dawn Saturday. It'll be a messy day for most of the region. While areas south and east of the city will most likely see precipitation change over to rain once temperatures rise above freezing, colder spots north and west of I-80 will continue to see mainly snow showers, Storm Team 4 says. Areas in between should see a mix. 

Daytime highs will vary across the region, but should range from the upper 30s to the low 40s. 

Part two of the storm forms Saturday evening, when a coastal storm will start brewing offshore and bring back somewhat colder air back into the area, along with accumulating snow across Long Island, the Hudson Valley and southwestern Connecticut. The heaviest snow should fall overnight Saturday into Subday morning.

Current projections show up to 3 inches of snow in city, mostly accumulating Saturday night, and 3 to 6 inches north and west of the city accumulating slowly through the day, especially in higher elevations. Eastern Suffolk County could see up to 6 inches or more of snow. 

Blustery and cold weather returns later in the day Sunday, and then spring officially arrived 6:28 a.m. Monday, when temperatures are expected to reach the mid-40s. After a slight uptick Tuesday, the mercury plunges back into the 30s for Wednesday before inching back up to the 40s again.

]]>
<![CDATA[Forecast for Friday, March 17]]>Fri, 17 Mar 2017 05:36:27 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/weather_WNBC_000000015487215.jpg

Chris Cimino's weather forecast for Friday, March 17.]]>
<![CDATA[Forecast for Friday, March 17]]>Fri, 17 Mar 2017 00:10:25 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015484228_1200x675_900057667953.jpg

Janice Huff's weather forecast for Friday, March 17.]]>
<![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Thursday March 16, 2017]]>Thu, 16 Mar 2017 19:48:06 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015483070_1200x675_899844675816.jpg

Janice Huff's forecast for March 16.]]>
<![CDATA[Forecast for Thursday, March 16]]>Thu, 16 Mar 2017 06:19:11 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/AM+WEB+WX+031617+-+03452222_WNBC_000000015465378.jpg

Chris Cimino’s weather forecast for Thursday, March 16th.]]>
<![CDATA[Forecast for Thursday, March 16]]>Thu, 16 Mar 2017 00:07:16 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC+LATE+EVE+WEB+WX+031517+-+00013221_WNBC_000000015462725.jpg

Janice Huff's weather forecast for Thursday, March 16]]>
<![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Wednesday March 15, 2017]]>Wed, 15 Mar 2017 19:23:05 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015461486_1200x675_898882627551.jpg

Janice Huff's forecast for March 15.]]>
<![CDATA[Forecast for Wednesday, March 15]]>Wed, 15 Mar 2017 04:49:22 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015449456_1200x675_898241091650.jpg

Chris Cimono's weather forecast for Wednesday, March 15. ]]>
<![CDATA[Forecast for Wednesday, March 15]]>Wed, 15 Mar 2017 00:05:10 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC+LATE+EVE+WEB+WX+031417+-+00022227_WNBC_000000015446854.jpg

Janice Huff's forecast for Wednesday, March 14.]]>
<![CDATA[Storm Team 4's Forecast & How the Storm Played Out]]>Tue, 14 Mar 2017 16:56:14 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/fb+live+storm+team+4+-+14441526_WNBC_0000000154440301.jpg

In a Facebook Live chat, Storm Team 4's Erica Grow and Steve Sosna explain how the forecast played out with the worst-case scenarios in some spots and why it did not in other spots. The range of snowfall totals comes from the team's best determination of what the storm's track would be -- and the forecast ended up having a very different outcome over a very short distance.]]>
<![CDATA[Storm Team 4's Updated Nor'easter Forecast]]>Tue, 14 Mar 2017 07:12:20 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015430366_1200x675_897391683639.jpg

Chris Cimino and Raphael Miranda's forecast for Tuesday, March 14.]]>
<![CDATA[Shifty Nor'easter Slams Tri-State With Snow, Wind and Floods]]>Tue, 14 Mar 2017 19:57:18 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/180*120/updated+noaa+gif.gif

UPDATE: Transit Chugs Back to Life as Nor'easter Moves Out; Digout Continues

States of emergency were declared in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut as a ferocious nor'easter descended on the region, dumping more than a foot of snow in spots amid dangerous cold and winds. 

Initial forecasts had predicted a foot and a half of snow for New York City, but models early Tuesday shifted west, meaning more of a wintry mix for the city and heavier snow inland. Some northern spots saw 15-plus inches by midday.

Storm Team 4's latest projections call for anywhere from 3 to 12 inches of snow in the city, depending on the borough, with up to 2 feet still possible in areas significantly farther north, and lesser amounts in coastal New Jersey. By 6:30 a.m., early-morning snow in Bay Shore had already shifted to rain. 

The National Weather Service lifted its blizzard warning for New York City, but the warning remained in effect for nearly two dozen counties across the metro area. Coastal flood warnings were also issued during high tide for four of the five boroughs (excluding Manhattan), the Jersey Shore and the South Shore of Long Island. High tide occurs at different times throughout the morning depending on location. Check latest weather alerts.

Despite the lowered snow projections in urban areas, Storm Team 4 says the storm, which started late Monday, will likely be the biggest of the winter for most of the region. The snow is not the only story, though. The dynamic storm may also feature thunder and lightning. Wind gusts could near 60 mph at times on Long Island, bringing the potential for widespread power outages. About 1,500 PSE&G customers (out of 1.1 million) were without power shortly after 9 a.m., but that number was expected to increase.

In New Jersey, there were about 30,000 outages across the state, according to Gov. Christie Tuesday afternoon. That included 13,000 outages reported by PSE&G, and 5,000 at Jersey Central Power and Light. All power is expected to be fully restored by the end of day Wednesday.

Snow began falling in the tri-state shortly before midnight and rapidly intensified before dawn. Storm Team 4 said heavy snow would fall most of the day, with up to 3 inches of snow dropping every hour in the early afternoon. By 10 a.m., 13 inches had accumulated in parts of north New Jersey. In Wantage, 17 inches of coated the ground. Central Park notched 4 inches, while parts of Queens saw 7 inches. Rockland and Orange counties were among the hardest hit, with 10 to 13 inches in spots. Check the latest snow totals in your neighborhood.

Meanwhile, schools were closed across the region. Mayor de Blasio took the unusual step of announcing the shutdown early Monday afternoon, well ahead of the worst of the storm, because of the confidence of the models. School districts in New Jersey and Connecticut followed suit shortly thereafter. De Blasio said early Tuesday afternoon schools would reopen Wednesday.

Gov. Cuomo said 2,000 National Guard troops had been called up and would be deployed to the southern tier. Non-essential state employees in areas impacted by the storm were asked to stay home Tuesday.

MTA subway service above ground was suspended at 4 a.m. but was set to resume at 6 p.m. Buses were running at reduced levels and the NYCT said cancellations and suspensions were expected. Cuomo said the MTA is expecting a normal rush Wednesday. See latest transit changes here. 

Metro-North service was also shut down at noon because of the combined wind-snow effect but was set to resume limited service at 6 p.m.. A tractor-trailer ban on many state highways was in effect.

"Over 90 percent of flights are canceled and government, schools are closed," Cuomo tweeted. "There is no reason to be on the roads. It's dangerous."

In Connecticut, Gov. Malloy issued a statewide travel ban at 5 a.m. It was to be lifted at 5 p.m. Tuesday.

In New Jersey, Gov. Christie says state employees should expect to return to work Wednesday.

"My intention right now is to have all state offices be open tomorrow, and be open at normal operating hours across the state," he said at an afternoon news conference Tuesday.

Christie says it's up to each school district to decide whether to close Wednesday. He expects schools in the south and central parts of New Jersey to "be open, for sure." Schools in the eight northern counties hit harder by the storm will have to make their own determinations. 

Falling and blowing snow with strong winds created whiteout conditions at times, making travel extremely dangerous if not impossible. Dozens of accidents were reported across the region. 

Though parts of the Jersey Shore were only expected to see a trace to a few inches of snow, coastal flooding and beach erosion pose a threat to shoreline communities. Video and photos posted to social media showed water bubbling in the streets of some beachfront communities by midday.

Storm Team 4 says the system will pull away from the tri-state between between 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday.

Light snow showers are in the forecast for Wednesday ahead of a blustery and sunny day Thursday. Highs will be in the 30s throughout the week, with St. Patrick's Day seeing the warmest temperatures and a mix of clouds and sun. 

Last Friday, a winter storm system dropped half a foot of snow on parts of the tri-state. It's not unusual for significant snow to fall in March in New York City. According to the National Weather Service, the city has seen storms with accumulations of at least 10 inches in March five times since 1888.

New York City has seen significantly less snow this winter compared to last year. It has snowed 20.5 inches so far this season compared to 32.3 inches by this time in 2016, an amount that was buoyed by one of the largest snowstorms in the city's history last January.



Photo Credit: NOAA
This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
<![CDATA[Storm Team 4's Nor'easter Forecast]]>Tue, 14 Mar 2017 04:34:23 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015428288_1200x675_897336387793.jpg

Chris Cimino and Raphael Miranda's weather forecast for Tuesday, March 14.]]>
<![CDATA[Storm Team 4's Nor'easter Forecast]]>Mon, 13 Mar 2017 23:49:40 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/huff+forecast.jpg

Janice Huff's weather forecast for Tuesday, March 14.]]>
<![CDATA[Storm Team 4's Nor'easter Forecast]]>Mon, 13 Mar 2017 21:52:53 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015424475_1200x675_897006659522.jpg

Janice Huff has the latest outlook on the nor'easter Monday evening. ]]>
<![CDATA[Storm Team 4's Blizzard Forecast]]>Mon, 13 Mar 2017 17:32:46 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015422908_1200x675_896876099677.jpg

Meteorologist Dave Price breaks down the timeline and expectations for the powerful nor'easter expected to batter the tri-state area Tuesday.]]>
<![CDATA[States of Emergency Across Tri-State as Nor'easter Arrives]]>Tue, 14 Mar 2017 06:54:21 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/180*120/noaa+radar+satellite+tuesday.gif

UPDATE: Projected Snow Totals Dip as Models Shift West; Latest Forecast, Expectations Here

A blizzard warning covered most of the tri-state Tuesday morning and a state of emergency was declared in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut as a nor'easter moved in. The storm is expected to bury the region in at least a foot of snow over a dangerously cold, windy 24-hour period.

Storm Team 4 says the storm, which started late Monday, will likely be the biggest of the winter, and 12 to 18 inches of snow are expected to fall on the city and immediate surrounding areas. Some spots could get up to 2 feet. Wind gusts will frequently top 40 mph and could near 60 mph at times on Long Island.

Snow began falling in the tri-state shortly before midnight Monday and rapidly intensified shortly before dawn. Storm Team 4 says heavy snow will fall most of the day, with up to 3 inches of snow dropping every hour in the early afternoon. The dynamic storm may even feature thunder and lightning. 

Mayor de Blasio declared a state of emergency for New York City beginning at midnight, and he announced that New York City public schools would be closed Tuesday. The same was expected for schools in New Jersey and Connecticut. Check school closings.

A state of emergency has also been declared for New York state beginning at midnight, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced. Non-essential state employees in areas being impacted by the storm are asked not to report to work Tuesday.

"Normally we have one region of the state affected and we deploy assets to the affected region," Cuomo said in a telephone news conference Monday afternoon. "This is a statewide situation, so we must deployed statewide which spreads our resources thin." 

Two thousand National Guard troops are being called up across the state. 

Similar states of emergency have been declared in New Jersey and Connecticut. A statewide travel ban will begin in Connecticut at 5 a.m., Gov. Malloy said. 

MTA subway service above ground was suspended at 4 a.m. and Staten Island Railway service was also suspended. Buses were running at reduced levels and the NYCT said cancellations and suspensions were expected. 

Metro-North will run on a reduced Sunday schedule Tuesday, with service on the New Cannan, Danbury, Waterbury and Wassaic branches, MTA said. LIRR would offer a normal weekday schedule, but cancellations are expected as conditions worsen. See latest transit changes here. There will be no Branch Line. 

The Hudson River Line bus service have been canceled for the day. 

East River Ferry service is suspending service on Tuesday. 

The National Weather Service issued a blizzard warning for the entire tri-state, except for Ocean and eastern Suffolk counties, which are under a winter storm warning. Coastal flood warnings were also issued during high tide for the Jersey Shore and the South Shore of Long Island. High tide occurs at different times throughout the morning depending on location. Check the latest storm advisories here.

Falling and blowing snow with strong winds and poor visibilities are likely, the National Weather Service said. This will lead to whiteout conditions, making travel extremely dangerous if not impossible. The worst weather window will be early morning Tuesday through Tuesday afternoon, Storm Team 4 says. Intense wind gusts could cause power outages across the region.  

In New York City, salt spreaders began hitting the roads Monday evening. As soon as snow accumulation reaches 2 inches, 1,600 snow plows from the sanitation department and 80 plows from the DOT will get to work, de Blasio says. 

The mayor warned people to stay off the roads, as whiteout conditions are expected and blacktop won't be visible for awhile at the height of the storm. 

"We're going to be hit with a tremendous challenge in the coming hours," he said. 

The state of emergency for New York City will clarify the ability of the NYPD and all city agencies to act as needed to keep roads clear and ensure the safety of residents, according to de Blasio. 

Newark has also declared a state of emergency. Residents in New Jersey's largest city are being asked to move their cars from snow emergency routes, and on all other streets, to park their cars on the side with even house numbers. Alternative parking lots are being provided at some lots, listed here. Garbage pick-up, recycling and street sweeping are suspended until further notice. 

Forecast models on Tuesday morning put the storm slightly offshore, which is the track that includes the heaviest snowfall for the city and surrounding suburbs, according to Storm Team 4.

Snow is expected to mix with sleet and rain along the Jersey Shore and in Suffolk County. The coasts are expected to see less snow totals as a result, with less than 6 inches of snow predicted for southern Ocean County and the Hamptons. Coastal flooding and beach erosion, however, pose a threat to shoreline communities.

Storm Team 4 says the system will pull away from the tri-state between between 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday.

Light snow showers are in the forecast for Wednesday ahead of a blustery and sunny day Thursday. Highs will be in the 30s throughout the work week, with St. Patrick's Day seeing the warmest temperatures and a mix of clouds and sun. 

Last Friday a winter storm system dropped half a foot of snow on parts of the tri-state. It's not unusual for significant snow to fall in March in New York City. According to the National Weather Service, the city has seen storms with accumulations of at least 10 inches in Marsh five times since 1888, though Tuesday's storm has the potential to blow them all out of the water.

New York City has seen significantly less snow this winter compared to last year. It has snowed 20.5 inches so far this season compared to 32.3 inches by this time in 2016, an amount that was buoyed by one of the largest snowstorms in the city's history last January.



Photo Credit: NOAA
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<![CDATA[What to Expect (and When) With the Nor'easter]]>Tue, 14 Mar 2017 12:27:44 -0400Storm Team 4 breaks down full forecast here.]]>Storm Team 4 breaks down full forecast here.]]>http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/C63wirYWwAAiaPa.jpgA nor'easter has arrived in the tri-state and is expected to be the biggest storm of the winter season. Storm Team 4 breaks down the timeline and what to expect.]]><![CDATA[Snow Prep Emergency Checklist: 15 Things to Do Right Now]]>Mon, 13 Mar 2017 12:54:51 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/food+drive+generic.jpg

The New York metropolitan area is preparing for a late-season storm that is expected to bring significant snowfall to much of the region.

The city could see up to 18 inches of snow, while some spots in the tri-state area may get hit with up to 2 feet, meteorologists say. Mayor de Blasio has already announced New York City schools will be closed Tuesday, and local and state officials across the region are urging residents to get prepared now. 

Here’s a compilation of snowstorm checklists from American Red Cross, the CDC and FEMA (also be sure to check our snow guide for the latest news you need to know about mass transit, roads and air travel).

  1. Keep a full tank of gas in your vehicle. A full tank will keep the fuel line from freezing. 
  2.  


  3. Have a first aid kit ready. Refill all of your prescriptions for at least a week's supply. Also make sure you’ve stocked for other medical items, such as contact lens solution and extra batteries for hearing aids. Don't forget any hygienic products like extra tampons and toothpaste.

  4. Lots of warm clothing and blankets are a must.

  5. If you have little ones, check baby supplies like formula, clean bottles, diapers and baby food. Make sure you have enough!

  6. Prepare battery-powered flashlights or lanterns (with extra batteries!). If the power goes out, avoid using candles. If you do use them, never leave them alone.

  7. Get a portable cellphone charger if you don't have one -- the kind that will work without electricity.

  8. Have a battery-powered carbon monoxide detector as back-up.

  9. A battery-powered radio will help keep you connected to alerts if the power does go out.

  10. Batteries, batteries, batteries.



  11. Have a supply of drinking water for at least three days. For other water sources, you can fill your bathtub. As a final resort, you can melt snow; boiling it will get rid of germs but may not get rid of some accumulated chemicals in it.



  12. Have a supply of canned or easily prepared food for at least three days. Look for peanut butter, crackers, trail mixes, and canned meats or fish. Some fruits like citrus fruits have a shelf life of two weeks without refrigeration. And by the way, don't expect grocery delivery to go out in what is likely to be dangerous conditions; Peapod has already said they are canceling Saturday and Sunday delivery.

  13. If you have a pet, don't forget pet supplies!

  14. If you have another supply of heat, such as  by space or kerosene heaters, make sure to keep them at least three feet away from anything flammable such as furniture or drapes. Never, ever leave kerosene heaters unattended, and make sure that both space heaters and kerosene heaters are turned off when you go to sleep.

  15. Keep a supply of rock salt for walkways and sand or cat litter to add traction. Also, help your neighborhood by digging out fire hydrants and note where fire hydrants are in your area.

  16. If you must use your car (which officials are strongly warning against), stock it with a mini kit of supplies, including a first aid kit, blankets, extra clothing, batteries, cell charger and booster cables.

 



    Photo Credit: Getty Images
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
    <![CDATA[Storm Team 4’s Forecast for the Nor’Easter]]>Mon, 13 Mar 2017 05:15:12 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC+TINY+CLEAN+AIRCHECK+0430-0500+-+03472924_WNBC_000000015412.jpg

    Chris Cimino’s weather forecast for Monday, March 13.]]>
    <![CDATA[Storm Team 4’s Forecast for the Nor’Easter]]>Mon, 13 Mar 2017 00:10:09 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC+LATE+EVE+WEB+WX+031217+-+00032820_WNBC_000000015410018+copy.jpg

    Erica Grow's weather forecast for Monday, March 13. ]]>
    <![CDATA[Storm Team 4’s Forecast for the Nor’Easter]]>Sun, 12 Mar 2017 22:23:21 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015408305_1200x675_896227395998.jpg

    Erica Grow's forecast for the upcoming nor'easter. ]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for March 12th.]]>Sun, 12 Mar 2017 11:06:45 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015407022_1200x675_896047171823.jpg

    Raphael Miranda’s forecast for March 12th.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Sunday, March 12]]>Sun, 12 Mar 2017 09:49:32 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015406812_1200x675_896019523601.jpg

    no description]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Saturday, March 11th]]>Sat, 11 Mar 2017 15:01:53 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015401846_1200x675_895632963752.jpg

    Raphael Miranda's midday forecast for Saturday, March 11, 2017.]]>
    <![CDATA[Blizzard Warning Issued Ahead of Crippling Nor'easter]]>Mon, 13 Mar 2017 10:00:50 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/blizzard+warning+totals.jpg

    UPDATE: Ferocious Nor'easter Threatens to Dump Up to 2 Feet of Snow; Latest Forecast, What to Expect

    A blizzard warning was issued for New York City and much of the tri-state ahead of a potentially crippling nor'easter that's expected to bring heavy snow and strong winds throughout the day Tuesday. 

    Storm Team 4 says the storm will likely be the biggest of the winter and a foot of snow could potentially drop in the tri-state. The metro New York region could see up to 12 to 18 inches of snow, with some spots getting up to 2 feet. Wind gusts will frequently top 40 mph and could near 60 mph at times on Long Island.

    The National Weather Service issued the blizzard warning for New York City and Long Island, as well as Fairfield, Westchester, Rockland, Bergen, Hudson, Essex, Union, Monmouth and Ocean counties all day Tuesday. A winter storm warning was in effect for the entire rest of the tri-state, including parts of North Jersey and the Hudson Valley. 

    A blizzard warning was issued in anticipation of blowing snow and extremely poor visibility — conditions that will start late Monday and continue through Tuesday evening. The worst weather window will be early morning Tuesday through Tuesday afternoon, Storm Team 4 says.

    Forecast models on Sunday night were continuing to put the storm slightly offshore, which is the track that includes the heaviest snowfall for the city and surrounding suburbs, according to Storm Team 4.

    If the storm ends up shifting closer to land, there's a higher chance that snow will mix with sleet and rain. Coastal flooding and beach erosion will be even more of a concern for shoreline communities, as the rain and sleet that were expected to stay out at sea batter the coasts instead. Suffolk and Ocean counties are the areas most likely to see sleet, rain and coastal erosion.

    A coastal flood watch was issued for Brooklyn, Staten Island and southern Queens for Tuesday morning in anticipation of possible flooding. 

    On Sunday, dry and cold weather was pushing average highs about 15 or 20 degrees below the seasonal norm for March. Lows were forecast to drop into the 20s in Manhattan and into the teens in the suburbs Sunday night. Monday will be cloudy, chilly and quiet, with highs in the low 30s ahead of Tuesday's storm.

    Snowflakes will start to fall in the tri-state between 1 a.m. and 5 a.m. Tuesday. Heavy snow will fall most of the day, with up to 3 inches of snow dropping every hour in the early afternoon, according to Storm Team 4. It will be the biggest snow storm for most of the tri-state, with many areas getting more than a foot of snow and some getting up to two feet.  

    Storm Team 4 says the system will pull away from the tri-state between between 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday.

    Some more snow showers are in the forecast for Wednesday ahead of a blustery and sunny day Thursday. Highs will be in the 30s throughout the work week, with St. Patrick's Day seeing the warmest temperatures and a mix of clouds and sun. 

    Last Friday a winter storm system dropped half a foot of snow on parts of the tri-state. 

    After the storm moved out by Friday evening, Middletown, New York had seen 6 inches accumulate, while Port Jervis and Mastic Beach, along with Monroe, Connecticut, had 5 inches. Seven inches covered the ground in Orange County's Montgomery. The five boroughs saw less snow, with Central Park getting about 2 inches. 

    New York City has seen significantly less snow this winter compared to last year. It has snowed 20.5 inches so far this season compared to 32.3 inches by this time in 2016, an amount that was buoyed by one of the largest snowstorms in the city's history last January.


    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Saturday, March 11th]]>Sat, 11 Mar 2017 08:13:41 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015401248_1200x675_895593027585.jpg

    Raphael Miranda's morning forecast for Saturday, March 11, 2017.]]>
    <![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Friday March 10, 2017]]>Fri, 10 Mar 2017 20:39:19 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015399250_1200x675_895343171842.jpg

    Janice Huff's forecast for March 10.]]>
    <![CDATA[Dangerous Black Ice, Brutal Cold Ahead]]>Sat, 11 Mar 2017 00:13:38 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/snowy+nyc+commute+friday+copy.jpg

    A winter storm system dropped half a foot of snow on parts of the tri-state Friday, bringing a bone-chilling cold front that was expected to keep temperatures below freezing all weekend. 

    All that snow will freeze solid overnight, Storm Team 4 says, and there will be plenty of black ice and slippery spots, especially on untreated surfaces, on both Saturday and Sunday morning. Gusty winds will put wind chills in the single digits and teens all day Saturday, with little improvement on Sunday. 

    After the storm moved out by Friday evening, Middletown, New York had seen 6 inches accumulate, while Port Jervis and Mastic Beach, along with Monroe, Connecticut, had 5 inches. Seven inches covered the ground in Orange County's Montgomery. The five boroughs saw less snow, with Central Park getting about 2 inches. 

    Nearly 300 flights were canceled at Newark, JFK and LaGuardia as a result of the snow Friday. Alternate side parking was suspended in New York City Friday to facilitate snow removal efforts, and NJ Transit said full systemwide cross-honoring was in effect Friday, allowing customers to use their ticket or pass across rail, bus or light rail. Meanwhile, Metro-North warned customers to be wary of slippery platforms. 

    Storm Team 4 is tracking another winter system with the potential to dump 6 inches of snow or more on the tri-state area early next week.

    New York City has seen significantly less snow this winter compared to last year. It has snowed 20.5 inches so far this season compared to 32.3 inches by this time in 2016, an amount that was buoyed by one of the largest snowstorms in the city's history last January.



    Photo Credit: Instagram user @noemadnyc
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Friday, March 10]]>Fri, 10 Mar 2017 08:00:21 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015387667_1200x675_894746691818.jpg

    Raphael Miranda's weather forecast Friday, March 10.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Friday, March 10]]>Fri, 10 Mar 2017 06:07:16 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015386453_1200x675_894718019926.jpg

    Raphael Miranda's forecast for Friday, March 10.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Friday, March 10]]>Fri, 10 Mar 2017 05:43:17 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015386040_1200x675_894710339811.jpg

    Raphael Miranda's weather forecast for Friday, March 10.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Friday, March 10]]>Fri, 10 Mar 2017 02:03:49 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/C6iGP-mVoAIRCax.jpg

    Janice Huff's weather forecast for Friday, March 10.]]>
    <![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Thursday March 9, 2017]]>Thu, 09 Mar 2017 21:29:34 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015382152_1200x675_894410819688.jpg

    Janice Huff's forecast for March 9.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Thursday, March 9]]>Thu, 09 Mar 2017 06:39:31 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/weather+forcast_WNBC_000000015366564+copy.jpg

    Raphael Miranda’s forecast for Thursday, March 9.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Thursday, March 9]]>Thu, 09 Mar 2017 01:02:26 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015364167_1200x675_893624387573.jpg

    Janice Huff's forecast for Thursday, March 9.]]>
    <![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Wednesday March 8, 2017]]>Wed, 08 Mar 2017 20:29:48 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015363282_1200x675_893471811608.jpg

    Janice Huff's forecast for March 8.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Wednesday, March 8]]>Wed, 08 Mar 2017 06:22:57 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC+TINY+CLEAN+AIRCHECK+0500-0600+-+05054905_WNBC_000000015351+copy.jpg

    Raphael Miranda's forecast for Wednesday, March 8.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Wednesday, March 8]]>Wed, 08 Mar 2017 01:00:18 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015349006_1200x675_892672579966.jpg

    Janice Huff's weather forecast for Wednesday, March 8. ]]>
    <![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Tuesday March 7, 2017]]>Tue, 07 Mar 2017 20:29:29 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015347980_1200x675_892494403803.jpgJanice Huff's forecast for March 7.]]><![CDATA[Forecast for Tuesday, March 7.]]>Tue, 07 Mar 2017 06:20:02 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015336287_1200x675_891851331662.jpg

    Raphael Miranda's forecast for Tuesday, March 7.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Tuesday, March 7]]>Tue, 07 Mar 2017 02:55:03 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015333890_1200x675_891689027652.jpg

    Janice Huff's weather forecast for Tuesday, March 7.]]>
    <![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Monday, March 6th]]>Mon, 06 Mar 2017 20:42:49 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015332798_1200x675_891466819960.jpg

    Janice Huff's early evening forecast for Monday, March 6, 2017.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Monday, March 6]]>Mon, 06 Mar 2017 06:48:26 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015319336_1200x675_890883139961.jpg

    David Price's weather forecast for Monday, March 6. ]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Monday, March 6]]>Mon, 06 Mar 2017 02:01:40 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015316663_1200x675_890814531985.jpg

    Erica Grow's weather forecast for Monday, March 6.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for March 5th]]>Sun, 05 Mar 2017 08:40:15 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015312395_1200x675_890452547723.jpg

    Chris Cimino's forecast for March 5th.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Saturday, March 4th]]>Sat, 04 Mar 2017 11:36:58 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015308995_1200x675_890130499585.jpg

    Erica Grow's midday forecast for Saturday, March 4, 2017.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Saturday, March 4th]]>Sat, 04 Mar 2017 08:48:08 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015308226_1200x675_890067523903.jpg

    Erica Grow's morning forecast for Saturday, March 4, 2017.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Friday, March 3]]>Fri, 03 Mar 2017 07:31:28 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015293766_1200x675_889258563680.jpg

    Chris Cimino's weather forecast for Friday, March 3.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Friday, March 3]]>Fri, 03 Mar 2017 01:08:35 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015291119_1200x675_889139267537.jpg

    Dave Price’s weather forecast for Friday, March 3.]]>
    <![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Thursday March 2, 2017]]>Thu, 02 Mar 2017 20:29:04 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015289775_1200x675_888966211668.jpg

    Dave Price’s forecast for March 2.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Thursday, March 2]]>Thu, 02 Mar 2017 07:22:02 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC+TINY+CLEAN+AIRCHECK+0500-0600+-+05161214_WNBC_000000015277+copy.jpg

    Chris Cimino's weather forecast for Thursday, March 2. ]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Thursday, March 2]]>Thu, 02 Mar 2017 01:07:45 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015274880_1200x675_888229955566.jpg

    Janice Huff's weather forecast for Thursday, March 2.]]>
    <![CDATA[Severe Storms Coming Our Way Amid Possible Record Temps]]>Thu, 02 Mar 2017 00:13:27 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/AP_7430112232891.jpg

    Unseasonably warm conditions Wednesday brought near-record breaking temperatures along with some unsettled weather, Storm Team 4 says. 

    A potent cold front heading toward the tri-state area generated scattered storms throughout the day Wednesday, though most was spared the heavy rain and winds that were initially poised to sweep through before the storm weakened. 

    Area airports braced for major delays, and LaGuardia had to shut down one of its runways for a short time earlier in the day after a lightning strike damaged the pavement. By early afternoon, average delays for arriving flights at JFK were more than four hours, with 90-minute delays reported at Newark and LaGuardia.

    A wind advisory -- which is issued when sustained winds hit 31 to 39 mph or gusts reach 46 to 57 mph -- is in effect for nine New York counties, including the five boroughs, and parts of New Jersey and Connecticut from 7 p.m. Wednesday through 7 p.m. Thursday. The strongest winds are expected Thursday morning. 

    The first day of March will feel more like May, though, with warmer air surging up from the southwest expected to drive temperatures 20 degrees higher than average for this time of year. Though clouds will dominate throughout the day, the mercury will surge into the 60s and 70s across the region, Storm Team 4 says, with 71 projected for Central Park. 

    Once the front moves through Wednesday evening, showers and storms will taper off and clouds will slowly start to break up. Winds will continue to strengthen in wake of the front, gusting up to 40 to 50 mph in spots. Colder and drier air will start to flow back into the region, and temperatures will steadily begin to fall overnight. 

    Daytime highs will peak in the upper 40s Thursday morning, but will slide into the lower to mid 40s by the afternoon as colder air continues to slide in, Storm Team 4 says. With winds gusting up to 50 mph, it will feel much more like it is in the 20s and 30s outside. You’ll need your heavier jacket through the remainder of the week, as highs only be in the lower 40s on Friday, and only in the upper 30s on Saturday. 

    A weak clipper system could spew off a few wet snow showers Friday morning, but other than that conditions look to remain dry and blustery. Winds will briefly ease overnight Thursday into Friday, but will pick up again later on Friday as the clipper system moves out.



    Photo Credit: AP/File
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Wednesday, March 1]]>Wed, 01 Mar 2017 07:12:27 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC+TINY+CLEAN+AIRCHECK+0600-0700+-+06003723_WNBC_000000015260+copy.jpg

    Chris Cimino's weather forecast for Wednesday, March 1.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Wednesday, March 1]]>Wed, 01 Mar 2017 02:47:42 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015256546_1200x675_887129667626.jpg

    Janice Huff's weather forecast for Wednesday, March 1. ]]>
    <![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Tuesday February 28, 2017]]>Tue, 28 Feb 2017 20:32:30 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015253740_1200x675_886894659618.jpg

    Janice Huff's forecast for February 28.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Tuesday, February 28]]>Tue, 28 Feb 2017 06:56:41 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015243454_1200x675_886374467767.jpg

    Chris Cimino's weather forecast for Tuesday, February 28. ]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Tuesday, February 28]]>Tue, 28 Feb 2017 00:43:20 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015240840_1200x675_886252099950.jpg

    Janice Huff's weather forecast for Tuesday, February 28. ]]>
    <![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Monday February 27, 2017]]>Mon, 27 Feb 2017 20:04:50 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015237768_1200x675_886081091651.jpg

    Janice Huff's forecast for February 27.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Monday, February 27]]>Mon, 27 Feb 2017 06:18:56 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015224245_1200x675_885601859657.jpg

    Chris Cimino's weather forecast for Monday, February 27.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Monday, February 27]]>Mon, 27 Feb 2017 05:52:18 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015221633_1200x675_885494339769.jpg

    Erica Grow's weather forecast for Monday, February 27.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for February 26th]]>Sun, 26 Feb 2017 11:40:13 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015218542_1200x675_885215811871.jpg

    Raphael Miranda's forecast for February 26th.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for February 26th]]>Sun, 26 Feb 2017 08:56:59 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015215758_1200x675_885149251685.jpg

    Raphael Miranda's forecast for February 26th.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Saturday, February 25th]]>Sat, 25 Feb 2017 13:42:11 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015211749_1200x675_884848195709.jpg

    Raphael Miranda's midday forecast for Saturday, February 25, 2017.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Saturday, February 25th]]>Sat, 25 Feb 2017 08:39:56 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015211215_1200x675_884780611733.jpg

    Raphael Miranda's morning forecast for Saturday, February 25, 2017.]]>
    <![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Friday February 24, 2017]]>Fri, 24 Feb 2017 20:34:16 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015208684_1200x675_884558915619.jpg

    Janice Huff's forecast for February 24.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Friday, February 24]]>Fri, 24 Feb 2017 06:54:05 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC+TINY+CLEAN+AIRCHECK+0500-0600+-+05352511_WNBC_000000015198+copy.jpg

    Chris Cimino's weather forecast for Friday, February 24. ]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Friday, February 24]]>Fri, 24 Feb 2017 01:43:11 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015195492_1200x675_883831875691.jpg

    Janice Huff's weather forecast fo Friday, February 24. ]]>
    <![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Thursday February 23, 2017]]>Thu, 23 Feb 2017 20:47:17 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015194250_1200x675_883680323970.jpg

    Janice Huff's forecast for February 23.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Thursday, February 23]]>Thu, 23 Feb 2017 06:11:08 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015179722_1200x675_883099715533.jpg

    Chris Cimino's weather forecast for Thursday, February 23.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Thursday, February 23]]>Thu, 23 Feb 2017 01:33:31 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015177565_1200x675_882961475823.jpg

    Janice Huff's weather forecast for Thursday, February 23. ]]>
    <![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Wednesday February 22, 2017]]>Wed, 22 Feb 2017 20:31:46 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015176268_1200x675_882792515849.jpg

    Janice Huff's forecast for February 22.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Wednesday, February 22]]>Wed, 22 Feb 2017 06:36:45 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015161412_1200x675_882263107732.jpg

    Chris Cimino's weather forecast for Wednesday, February 22. ]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Wednesday, February 22]]>Wed, 22 Feb 2017 02:32:45 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015159457_1200x675_882155587807.jpg

    Janice Huff's weather forecast for Wednesday, February 22. ]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Tuesday, February 21]]>Tue, 21 Feb 2017 07:33:53 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015146833_1200x675_881441347614.jpg

    Chris Cimino's weather forecast for Tuesday, February 21. ]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Tuesday, February 21]]>Tue, 21 Feb 2017 01:46:27 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015144462_1200x675_881342531510.jpg

    Janice Huff's weather forecast for Tuesday, February 21. ]]>
    <![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Monday February 20, 2017]]>Mon, 20 Feb 2017 20:18:34 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015143271_1200x675_881222723805.jpgJanice Huff's forecast for February 20.]]><![CDATA[A February Day So Nice, It Broke Records]]>Sun, 19 Feb 2017 22:12:09 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/sunday+record+highs.jpg

    New Yorkers left their coats at home and crowded the parks on Sunday to enjoy record-setting warm weather that felt more like April than February. 

    JFK airport hit 68 degrees and Newark reached 69 degrees, knocking down the record of 66 set in both places in 1997. 

    LaGuardia airport got up to 66 degrees and Bridgeport topped out at 63 degrees, also new record highs for the day. 

    Although Central Park fell shy of a record, the balmy day and sunshine drew throngs of New Yorkers out for fresh air and a sneak peek of spring. 

    President’s Day will be slightly cooler, about 50 degrees, but it'll still be unseasonably mild. '

    Tuesday will see more seasonable weather with highs in the mid-40s and a chance for rain after sunset. 

    Then it gets warm again, with a chance for temps nearing 60 degrees both Wednesday and Thursday.

    NOAA is forecasting an unseasonably warm spring ahead, despite what Puxatony Phil predicted earlier this month. Maybe Staten Island Chuck should become the national groundhog. He predicted an early spring.

    ]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for February 19th]]>Sun, 19 Feb 2017 12:22:58 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015125846_1200x675_880557635969.jpg

    Raphael Miranda's forecast for February 19th.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for February 19th]]>Sun, 19 Feb 2017 09:05:01 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015124951_1200x675_880511555738.jpg

    Raphael Miranda's forecast for February 19th.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Saturday, February 18th]]>Sat, 18 Feb 2017 16:15:15 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015120892_1200x675_880230979844.jpg

    Raphael Miranda's midday forecast for Saturday, February 18, 2017.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Saturday, February 18th]]>Sat, 18 Feb 2017 08:49:49 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015120467_1200x675_880166979674.jpg

    Raphael Miranda's morning forecast for Saturday, February 18, 2017.]]>
    <![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Friday February 17, 2017]]>Fri, 17 Feb 2017 20:24:40 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015117641_1200x675_879939651863.jpg

    Janice Huff’s forecast for February 17.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Friday, February 17]]>Fri, 17 Feb 2017 08:28:09 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/EARLYAMWEBWX021717_15523110_1200x675_879437379900.jpg

    Chris Cimino's weather forecast for Friday, February 17.]]>
    <![CDATA[Temps Hit 60-Degree Mark for President's Day Weekend]]>Sun, 19 Feb 2017 12:23:26 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WarmWinterNYC.jpg

    The mild temperatures and abundant sunshine throughout Saturday will continue a spring-like Presidents Day weekend with temperatures expected to break the 60-degree mark Sunday. 

    Temperatures warmed to an above-average 61 degrees in Central Park by mid-afternoon Saturday as bitter winds subsided. Sunday consists of mostly sunny skies and dry weather. Some temperature highs may be broken today as highs climb into the mid-60s.

    A weak cold front will slowly move through the tri-state Sunday, but we won't receive chilly temps — the cold front will be so weak that high temperatures will still reach well above normal. However, a stronger cold front will roll through during the overnight into Monday morning.

    President’s Day will be slightly cooler, about 50 degrees, but it'll still be unseasonably mild.

    Highs will be near or in the 50s throughout next week. The week starts sunny but becomes progressively cloudier ahead of possible showers Friday. Showers are possible late Tuesday and are likely early Wednesday.

    By next Saturday, highs should be back up in the mid-50s.

    NOAA is forecasting an unseasonably warm spring ahead, despite what Puxatony Phil predicted earlier this month. Maybe Staten Island Chuck should become the national groundhog. He predicted an early spring.

    ]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Friday, February 17]]>Fri, 17 Feb 2017 03:29:36 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015101307_1200x675_879305795953.jpg

    Janice Huff's weather forecast for Friday, February 17.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Thursday, February 16]]>Thu, 16 Feb 2017 06:39:47 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015087617_1200x675_878546499826.jpg

    Chris Cimino's weather forecast for Thursday, February 16. ]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Thursday, February 16]]>Thu, 16 Feb 2017 01:35:31 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015084775_1200x675_878405699800.jpg

    Janice Huff's weather forecast for Thursday, February 16.]]>
    <![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Wednesday February 15, 2017]]>Wed, 15 Feb 2017 20:22:09 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015083710_1200x675_878231619850.jpg

    Janice Huff's forecast for February 15.]]>
    <![CDATA[Early evening forecast for Thursday February 16, 2017.]]>Thu, 16 Feb 2017 20:40:28 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015100169_1200x675_879163459712.jpg

    Janice Huff's forecast for February 16.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for February 15th]]>Wed, 15 Feb 2017 13:14:43 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015078551_1200x675_877843523967.jpg

    Dave Price's forecast for February 15th.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Wednesday, February 15]]>Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:59:49 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC+TINY+CLEAN+AIRCHECK+0500-0600+-+05003103_WNBC_000000015069+copy.jpg

    Chris Cimino's weather forecast for Wednesday, February 15.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for February 15th]]>Wed, 15 Feb 2017 12:29:16 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015073321_1200x675_877732419835.jpg

    Chris Cimino's forecast for February 15th.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Wednesday, February 15]]>Wed, 15 Feb 2017 00:39:09 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015066600_1200x675_877503555702.jpg

    Janice Huff's weather forecast for Wednesday, February 15.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Tuesday, Feb. 14]]>Tue, 14 Feb 2017 07:58:03 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015053446_1200x675_876760131747.jpg

    Meteorologist Chris Cimino has your forecast for Tuesday, Feb. 14.]]>
    <![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Monday February 13, 2017]]>Mon, 13 Feb 2017 20:23:10 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015049541_1200x675_876431427999.jpg

    Janice Huff's forecast for February 13.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Monday, Feb. 13]]>Mon, 13 Feb 2017 08:04:17 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015035798_1200x675_875929667663.jpg

    Meteorologist Chris Cimino has your forecast for Monday, Feb. 13.]]>
    <![CDATA[Wet Snow, Sleet, Freezing Rain for Tri-State]]>Sun, 12 Feb 2017 11:40:16 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015030236_1200x675_875551811740.jpg

    Raphael Miranda's forecast for February 12th.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for February 12th]]>Sun, 12 Feb 2017 08:42:08 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015029105_1200x675_875489859875.jpg

    Raphael Miranda's forecast for February 12th.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Saturday, February 11th]]>Sat, 11 Feb 2017 13:08:03 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015025503_1200x675_875108931757.jpg

    Raphael Miranda's midday forecast for Saturday, February 11, 2017.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Saturday, February 11th]]>Sat, 11 Feb 2017 08:26:57 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015024652_1200x675_875054659819.jpg

    Raphael Miranda's morning forecast for Saturday, February 11, 2017.]]>
    <![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Friday February 10, 2017]]>Fri, 10 Feb 2017 20:17:43 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015022283_1200x675_874784323603.jpg

    Janice Huff’s forecast for February 10.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Friday, February 10]]>Fri, 10 Feb 2017 06:20:12 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC+TINY+CLEAN+AIRCHECK+0500-0600+-+05013514_WNBC_000000015008+copy.jpg

    Chris Cimino's weather forecast for Friday, February 10. ]]>
    <![CDATA[Brutal Cold, Dangerous Black Ice in Snowstorm’s Wake]]>Fri, 10 Feb 2017 08:56:49 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC+TINY+CLEAN+AIRCHECK+0430-0500+-+04394605_WNBC_000000015007+copy.jpg

    The powerful storm that dumped more than a foot of snow on parts of the tri-state had moved out by Friday morning, leaving behind frigid temperatures, brutal winds and heaps of wet snow — perfect conditions for perilous black ice.

    Clumps of wet, icy snow remained on many area streets and sidewalks, and officials warned that black ice and slick spots posed a significant threat on untreated surfaces as commuters hit the roads and rails Friday.

    Temperatures were well below freezing Friday morning and were expected to stay bitterly cold throughout the day as blustery winds continued. 

    Patches of black ice formed in the five boroughs and along the Jersey Shore, but were expected to be more widespread to the northwest of the city, as well as on Long Island and in Connecticut. 

    A black ice alert was in effect for all of New Jersey Friday and schools were to be delayed 90 minutes to give buses time to get to pick up students safely. 

    Thursday’s storm was blamed for at least one death in New York City. It also caused hundreds of car accidents, crippled travel by ground and air, closed schools and offices, and cut power to thousands of people across the tri-state.

    Long Island, where a state of emergency was declared in Suffolk County and whiteout conditions were widespread, saw more than a foot of snow in many spots. Selden got 16 inches, while 15.5 inches fell on Bohemia and 14 inches on Hicksville.

    There was also significant snowfall in the Hudson Valley, with 12 inches of snow recorded in Poughkeepsie and Kingston. Snow piled up in New York City too, with Fresh Meadows, Queens, getting 13.2 inches and the northwest Bronx, 12.5 inches. In New Jersey, Highland Lakes saw 11.1 inches.

    It's forecast to warm a little this weekend, with highs in the 40s under mostly cloudy skies. Sprinkles are possible Saturday and rain is likely Sunday.

    ]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Friday, February 10]]>Fri, 10 Feb 2017 00:48:51 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015005540_1200x675_874057283975.jpg

    Janice Huff's weather forecast for Friday, February 10. ]]>
    <![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Thursday February 9, 2017]]>Thu, 09 Feb 2017 20:10:59 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000015002754_1200x675_873881155757.jpg

    Janice Huff's forecast for February 9.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Thursday, February 9]]>Thu, 09 Feb 2017 07:28:59 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC+TINY+CLEAN+AIRCHECK+0600-0700+-+06073609_WNBC_000000014983+copy.jpg

    Chris Cimino and Raphael Miranda's weather forecast for Thursday, February 9.]]>
    <![CDATA[Snowstorm Dumps Foot of Snow, Brutal Cold Sets In]]>Fri, 10 Feb 2017 00:54:24 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/ny+snow+mess.jpg

    The monster winter storm that dumped more than a foot of snow in some parts of the tri-state area pulled away Thursday evening, leaving behind a brutal chill in its wake that could make travel dangerously icy into Friday morning.  

    The snowstorm was blamed for at least one death in New York City. A 59-year-old doorman shoveling snow at a building on 93rd Street slipped on the steps and fell back through a glass window, severely cutting his neck, law enforcement sources say. He died at a hospital.

    Blizzard and winter storm warnings, which were in effect for nearly of the tri-state, were discontinued by Thursday evening. Long Island, where residents experienced whiteout conditions, appeared to get the worst of the storm. While snow began tapering off in New Jersey before noon, the last flakes weren't didn't leave Long Island till evening. Storm Team 4 breaks down the timeline here.

    Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone declared a state of emergency as Commack recorded a foot of snow by 1 p.m., and thousands were left without power.

    Explosive moisture growth created ripe conditions for thundersnow (thunderstorms forming over cool pockets of air) across Nassau and Suffolk counties as the storm surged over the island. Some instances of the rare weather phenomenon were reported in Connecticut, where, by early afternoon, parts of Fairfield County had seen a foot. 

    Public schools in New York City were closed for just the 11th time in 12 years, but Mayor de Blasio said he anticipated roads to be cleared enough for classes to resume Friday. NBC 4 New York's live cam showed some brave souls trying to hoof it through the Crossroads of the World as others, failing to heed the pleas of city officials, navigated the roads.

    Most of the tri-state saw a total of 8 to 13 inches of snow by storm's end. The Fresh Meadows neighborhood of Queens got over 13 inches of snow, while the northwest Bronx saw just over a foot. Midwood, Brooklyn, saw 10 inches, while Central Park recorded 9.4 inches. Alternate side parking is suspended in the city through Saturday, but meter rules remain in effect. 

    De Blasio urged New Yorkers to stay inside. 

    "If you need to go out, please don’t use your car because we need to let our Sanitation Department clear the roads,” he said at a news briefing.

    The Jersey Shore, meanwhile, got about 4 to 10 inches. Northern New Jersey saw more accumulation, with more than 9 inches reported in several Bergen County towns.

    All New Jersey state offices were closed for non-essential employees, Gov. Christie says. Schools were closed as well. The state's Office of Emergency Management reported nearly 200 accidents before noon, and that number was expected to grow. Connecticut Gov. Malloy also asked non-essential employees to stay home. 

    The storm crippled travel by ground and air, and over 2,000 flights at area airports were canceled ahead of and during the storm, The Federal Aviation Administration implemented a full ground stop at JFK to allow crews to clear the Queens runways. 

    According to the National Weather Service, snow fell at incredibly quick rates -- up to 3 inches an hour at LaGuardia and up to 2 inches an hour at JFK. Wind gusts were expected to reach up to 45 miles per hour, with the strongest gusts recorded along the coast. In Suffolk County, 64 mph gusts were recorded in northeast Calverton. 

    Visibility was only a half- to a quarter-mile at times, making for hazardous travel conditions all day. Unable to get around safely by car and hampered by snowy sidewalks, some New Yorkers got creative. At least one woman used skis to get around.

    Black ice could be a potential danger overnight as temperatures plunge into the teens in Manhattan, and into the single digits in the distant north and west of the city. 

    Temperatures will warm a little this weekend, with highs in the 40s under mostly cloudy skies. Sprinkles are possible Saturday and rain is likely Sunday.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Thursday, February 9]]>Thu, 09 Feb 2017 01:11:31 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC+11PM+AIRCHECK+M-Sun+-+23011816_WNBC_000000014978838+copy.jpg

    Janice Huff's weather forecast for Thursday, February 9. ]]>
    <![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Wednesday February 8, 2017]]>Wed, 08 Feb 2017 20:18:19 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014977160_1200x675_872991811840.jpg

    Janice Huff's forecast for February 8.]]>
    <![CDATA[Storm Team 4 Breaks Down Snow Expectations, Timeline]]>Thu, 09 Feb 2017 15:59:13 -0400More forecast details here.]]>More forecast details here.]]>http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC+11PM+AIRCHECK+M-Sun+-+23010323_WNBC_000000014978768.jpg

    Storm Team 4 is tracking a major winter storm that could dump more than a foot of snow on parts of the tri-state area within 10 hours Thursday, bringing blizzard-like conditions to the region and crippling travel for hundreds of thousands of people. 

    Check the latest snow totals in your neighborhood here.

    Here's an hourly look at what to expect over the course of the day.

    3 a.m. to 6 a.m.: Wet, heavy snow starts in the tri-state from west to east, likely reaching New York City in the form of chunky snowflakes by 6 a.m. Snow could fall at a rate of 2 inches per hour, perhaps even heavier at times, will reduce visibility to near-zero on the roadways and will cause slick spots to develop quickly on highways.

    6 a.m. to 9 a.m.: Snow begins falling in New York City, the Hudson Valley and points east, including Long Island and Connecticut. Travel conditions become increasingly hazardous. Thundersnow was reported in isolated areas as the storm rapidly intensified. 

    9 a.m. to noon: Snow continues, falling heavily at times, throughout the tri-state. Snow is starting to get more light and fluffy in texture. Wind speeds and gusts are increasing, with gusts frequently exceeding 30 mph.  Visibility is poor and driving conditions are very difficult. Power outages are possible as increasing snow weighs on tree limbs and power lines. 

    Noon to 3 p.m.: Snow tapers off in New Jersey and the Hudson Valley from southwest to northeast. Four to 8 inches of snow will have fallen in Ocean and Monmouth counties, though the snow will be heavier and wetter. 

    3 p.m. to 6 p.m.: Snow ends in the city and close-in suburbs, including Westchester and Rockland counties, most of Long Island and Fairfield County in Connecticut, rapidly shutting off from west to east. Once the snow has ended in any particular area, it's done. Accumulation totals are expected to range from 10 to 15 inches, with locally higher amounts. 

    6 p.m. to 9 p.m.: The last of the snow exits the eastern end of Long Island.


    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Wednesday, February 8]]>Wed, 08 Feb 2017 07:19:51 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014964752_1200x675_872419395589.jpg

    Chris Cimino's weather forecast for Wednesday, February 8. ]]>
    <![CDATA[Storm Team 4 Breaks Down Snow Expectations, Timeline]]>Thu, 09 Feb 2017 11:24:56 -0400More forecast details here.]]>More forecast details here.]]>http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/C4M0tnDWIAAQD4g.jpgStorm Team 4 is tracking a major winter storm that could dump more than a foot of snow on parts of the tri-state area within 10 hours Thursday. Here's a breakdown of what to expect over the next few days. ]]><![CDATA[Winter Weather Warning in Effect]]>Thu, 09 Feb 2017 01:12:13 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/weather-AP358359029518_1.jpg

    A winter storm warning has gone into effect for the tri-state, with Storm Team 4 now predicting up to 10 to 15 inches of snow for much of the area.

    The storm was moving in a bit sooner than expected, and snow totals could now reach up to 10 to 15 inches in New York City, northern and central New Jersey, lower Hudson Valley, Connecticut and Long Island. 

    Along the Jersey Shore, about 3 to 6 inches of snow is expected, while areas north and west of the city will get about 6 to 10 inches.

    In Suffolk County, a blizzard warning has been issued, which means there will be blowing and drifting of snow and whiteout conditions for three consecutive hours. 

    New York City public schools will be closed Thursday for the storm, Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Wednesday evening. 

    All New Jersey state offices are closed for non-essential employees, Gov. Christie says. In Connecticut, Gov. Malloy asked non-essential employees to stay home Thursday. 

    The storm is expected to cripple travel by ground and air, with conditions deteriorating rapidly as the rate of snowfall increases over the course of the morning. Over 2,000 flights across the U.S. were canceled for Thursday, including more than 200 each at LaGuardia, Newark and Kennedy airports, according to FlightAware.com. 

    According to the National Weather Service, snow could fall at a rate of 1 to 2 inches per hour, with more than 2 inches per hour possible in spots. Wind gusts are expected to reach up to 35 mph, with the strongest gusts along the coast, where meteorologists say near-blizzard conditions are possible.

    Visibility is expected to be only a half to a quarter mile at times, making for hazardous travel conditions early Thursday through the afternoon. Snow is expected to begin falling overnight, with the heaviest snow likely from 7 a.m. through 1 p.m., Storm Team 4 says.

    Widespread power outages are also possible as snow weighs on tree limbs and power lines. The threat for power outages will be less where temperatures are mostly below 30 degrees during the snow, meteorologists say.

    New York City Department of Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia said at an afternoon news briefing the storm was expected to be extremely dangerous and the city was preparing accordingly. Earlier, the agency said that it would assign 2,400 workers per shift to 12-hour shifts starting at 7 p.m. Wednesday. Sixteen hundred plows are on standby and nearly 700 salt spreaders will be pre-treating roads and sidewalks ahead of the storm. Alternate side parking is suspended in New York City Thursday. Meter rules remain in effect. 

    The storm comes on the tail end of a springlike Wednesday, when some tri-state areas saw record-breaking temperatures. The mercury climbed to 62 degrees in Central Park by early afternoon, breaking the previous 61-degree record for Feb. 8 set in 1965. Newark Airport and LaGuardia also beat records set in 1965, with temperatures reaching 64 degrees and 61 degrees, respectively. 

    Storm Team 4 says that after the winter storm passes, temperatures will drop into the 20s on Friday. Windy weather will make it feel even colder.

    Temperatures will warm a little this weekend, with highs in the 40s under mostly cloudy skies. Sprinkles are possible Saturday and rain is likely Sunday.



    Photo Credit: AP
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Wednesday, February 8]]>Wed, 08 Feb 2017 01:21:59 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014962244_1200x675_872292931649.jpg

    Janice Huff's weather forecast for Wednesday, February 8.]]>
    <![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Tuesday February 7, 2017]]>Tue, 07 Feb 2017 20:14:06 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014961198_1200x675_872108099947.jpg

    Janice Huff's forecast for February 7.]]>
    <![CDATA[Wacky Weather Ahead: Spring Surge, Then Winter Storm]]>Wed, 08 Feb 2017 10:31:52 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/Feb+9+Snowfall+Map+1.png

    UPDATE: 6 to 12 Inches Possible for Much of Tri-State; Storm Team 4 Breaks Down Expectations, Timeline

    Storm Team 4 is tracking the possibility of a significant winter storm for the tri-state starting Wednesday night as a winter storm watch was issued for late Wednesday night into Thursday afternoon. 

    The National Weather Service issued the watch for New York City, Long Island, northeast New Jersey, the lower Hudson Valley and southern Connecticut, warning travel could be hazardous due to the snow-covered roads and poor visibility.

    Up to 6 to 10 inches of snow could fall, though meteorologists caution the track of the system remains highly uncertain. 

    The first forecast for the region includes a wide swath that could see as much as a foot of snow, including the five boroughs of New York City. 

    Much remains uncertain about the storm, though as of Tuesday afternoon it appears the balance will fall over a period of six to eight hours, starting with Thursday's commute. 

    In the meantime, the tri-state will deal with rain and a wintry mix Tuesday. 

    Some rain fell overnight in the city and near the Jersey Shore, with minor snow and ice accumulations building up north and west, though Storm Team 4 says the steadiest rain will fall during the middle of the day Tuesday. 

    Spotty light showers will continue across the area Tuesday night before tapering off Wednesday morning. 

    Wednesday will be breezy and mild with mostly cloudy skies and an unseasonable high of 60 degrees. Temperatures dive back into the 30s Thursday.



    Photo Credit: Storm Team 4
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Tuesday, February 7]]>Tue, 07 Feb 2017 06:15:20 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014949145_1200x675_871577155735.jpg

    Chris Cimino's weather forecast for Tuesday, February 7.]]>
    <![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Monday February 6, 2017]]>Mon, 06 Feb 2017 20:15:43 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014945936_1200x675_871308867666.jpg

    Janice Huff's forecast for February 6.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Monday, February 6]]>Mon, 06 Feb 2017 11:02:40 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014932555_1200x675_870825539824.jpg

    And here's what's happening in today's weather. ]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Monday, February 6]]>Mon, 06 Feb 2017 01:09:14 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/C38_1U_WEAEbhEB.jpgErica Grow's weather forecast for Monday, February 6. ]]><![CDATA[Forecast for February 5th]]>Sun, 05 Feb 2017 08:53:07 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014926807_1200x675_870476355729.jpgRaphael Miranda's forecast for February 5th.]]><![CDATA[Forecast for Saturday, February 4th]]>Sat, 04 Feb 2017 08:14:22 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014922738_1200x675_870090819542.jpgRaphael Miranda's morning forecast for Saturday, February 4, 2017.]]><![CDATA[Forecast for Friday, February 3rd]]>Fri, 03 Feb 2017 07:18:00 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014905918_1200x675_869258819598.jpgChris Cimino's weather forecast for Friday, February 3. ]]><![CDATA[Forecast for Friday, February 3]]>Fri, 03 Feb 2017 01:31:15 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014902867_1200x675_869116483725.jpgJanice Huff's weather forecast for Friday, February 3.]]><![CDATA[Forecast for Thursday, February 2]]>Thu, 02 Feb 2017 06:39:19 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014888091_1200x675_868343363960.jpgChris Cimino's weather forecast for Thursday, February 2. ]]><![CDATA[Forecast for Thursday, February 2]]>Thu, 02 Feb 2017 01:20:57 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014885437_1200x675_868198979652.jpgJanice Huff's weather forecast for Thursday, February 2. ]]><![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Wednesday February 1, 2017]]>Wed, 01 Feb 2017 20:14:37 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014884340_1200x675_867994179890.jpgJanice Huff's forecast for February 1.]]><![CDATA[Forecast for Wednesday, February 1]]>Wed, 01 Feb 2017 07:10:55 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC+TINY+CLEAN+AIRCHECK+0600-0700+-+06052209_WNBC_000000014870+copy.jpgChris Cimino's weather forecast for Wednesday, February 1.]]><![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Tuesday January 31, 2017]]>Tue, 31 Jan 2017 20:12:04 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014865071_1200x675_867096131893.jpgJanice Huff's forecast for January 31.]]><![CDATA[Forecast for Tuesday, January 31]]>Tue, 31 Jan 2017 07:09:45 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014853058_1200x675_866489411988.jpgChris Cimino's weather forecast for Tuesday, January 31.]]><![CDATA[Forecast for Tuesday, January 31]]>Tue, 31 Jan 2017 02:04:22 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014851070_1200x675_866413635624.jpgJanice Huff's weather forecast for Tuesday, January 31.]]><![CDATA[Alberta Clipper Brings Snow, Messy Travel to Tri-State ]]>Tue, 31 Jan 2017 19:27:33 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/214*120/bdspitzthumb.png

    Snow showers picked up over the course of the day Tuesday after some light flurries in the morning, and the slippery system mucked up the evening commute, Storm Team 4 says. 

    Most of the tri-state got anywhere from a half-inch to 2 inches of snow, according to Storm Team 4. Central Park got just under an inch of snow, while JFK Airport saw a half-inch of snow, while other parts of Queens and the Bronx got about 1.5 inches. Northern New Jersey saw close to 2 inches of snow, and Westchester saw about 1 to 2 inches. 

    Parts of Fairfield and New Haven saw over 2 inches of snow. 

    The snow tapered off to flurries for the evening commute, and Storm Team 4 cautioned roads could be slick as the system moves out.

    High temperatures won't get out of the mid-30s Tuesday, though suburbs to the north and west of the city barely will see the mercury climb above freezing. The rest of the week looks quiet, with temperatures hovering in the 30s after a brief uptick Wednesday, Storm Team 4 says.  



    Photo Credit: Instagram user @bdspitzthumb
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
    <![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Monday January 30, 2017]]>Mon, 30 Jan 2017 20:21:08 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014849600_1200x675_866201155972.jpgJanice Huff's forecast for January 30.]]><![CDATA[Forecast for Monday, January 30]]>Mon, 30 Jan 2017 06:22:20 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014838004_1200x675_865684035516.jpgChris Cimino's weather forecast for Monday, January 30.]]><![CDATA[Forecast for Monday, January 30]]>Mon, 30 Jan 2017 01:19:31 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014835184_1200x675_865571395970.jpgErica Grow’s weather forecast for Monday, January 30.]]><![CDATA[Forecast for January 29th]]>Sun, 29 Jan 2017 13:51:19 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014832716_1200x675_865277507513.jpgRaphael Miranda's forecast for January 29th.]]><![CDATA[Forecast for January 29th]]>Sun, 29 Jan 2017 08:35:26 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014831850_1200x675_865222723944.jpgRaphael Miranda's forecast for January 29th.]]><![CDATA[Forecast for Saturday, January 28th]]>Sat, 28 Jan 2017 11:41:13 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014828363_1200x675_864876099996.jpgRaphael Miranda's midday forecast for Saturday, January 28, 2017.]]><![CDATA[Forecast for Saturday, January 28th]]>Sat, 28 Jan 2017 08:35:51 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014827896_1200x675_864806467615.jpgRaphael Miranda's morning forecast for Saturday, January 28, 2017.]]><![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Friday January 27, 2017]]>Fri, 27 Jan 2017 20:17:17 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014825443_1200x675_864502851907.jpgJanice Huff's forecast for January 27.]]><![CDATA[Forecast for Friday, January 27]]>Fri, 27 Jan 2017 06:25:26 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014812718_1200x675_863993923646.jpgChris Cimino's weather forecast for Friday, January 27.]]><![CDATA[Forecast for Friday, January 27]]>Fri, 27 Jan 2017 01:15:59 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014810273_1200x675_863898691965.jpgJanice Huff's weather forecast for Friday, January 27.]]><![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Thursday January 26, 2017]]>Thu, 26 Jan 2017 20:36:55 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014808991_1200x675_863720515594.jpgJanice Huff's forecast for January 26.]]><![CDATA[Forecast for Thursday, January 26]]>Thu, 26 Jan 2017 06:09:10 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014796248_1200x675_863127619953.jpgChris Cimino's weather forecast for Thursday, January 26.]]><![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Wednesday January 25, 2017]]>Wed, 25 Jan 2017 21:13:29 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014792720_1200x675_862758979851.jpgJanice Huff's forecast for January 25.]]><![CDATA[Forecast for Wednesday, January 25]]>Wed, 25 Jan 2017 06:21:39 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014780518_1200x675_862218307556.jpgChris Cimino's weather forecast for Wednesday, January 25. ]]><![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Tuesday January 24, 2017]]>Tue, 24 Jan 2017 20:40:32 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014775521_1200x675_861943875658.jpgJanice Huff's forecast for January 24.]]><![CDATA[Forecast for Tuesday, January 24]]>Tue, 24 Jan 2017 06:29:02 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC+TINY+CLEAN+AIRCHECK+0500-0600+-+05170112_WNBC_000000014764+copy.jpgChris Cimino's weather forecast for Tuesday, January 24.]]><![CDATA[Wind, Rain Wreak Havoc as Nor'easter Blasts Tri-State]]>Tue, 24 Jan 2017 20:13:25 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/tristate+noreaster.jpg

    A powerful nor’easter unleashed rain and wind on communities across the tri-state as it continued its push through the Northeast Monday night, toppling trees, flooding streets and wreaking havoc on transit systems.

    The storm sent objects flying in New York City, cut power to thousands on Long Island and New Jersey, crippled rail service and dropped snow on the Hudson Valley on Monday.

    New York City, Long Island and parts of New Jersey and Connecticut were under a slew of weather advisories, watches and warnings. See the latest Storm Team 4 updates for your county and school closings.

    Storm Team 4 said strong gusts will gradually ease Tuesday morning; peak gusts will range between 30 and 40 mph. It will still be cloudy and breezy with lingering showers throughout the day, but the worst of the nor’easter is over by Tuesday evening. Highs will be in the low 40s.

    Temperatures warm into the low 50s on Wednesday and stay in the 50s on a damp Thursday, Storm Team 4 said. It gets colder on Friday and into the weekend but it will remain dry and even be sunny at times.

    Wind was the main concern with the nor'easter throughout the day Monday as gusts approached 60 mph and offshore winds neared hurricane levels of 74 mph or higher. Train service was interrupted by downed power lines; Amtrak suspended service for Northeast Regional and Acela Express trains traveling in New Jersey, and NJ Transit halted service between Trenton and New York City. 

    Other railroads contended with downed trees and utility poles on tracks, including on Long Island, where a downed utility pole prompted an LIRR suspension on the Port Washington Branch. 

    The wind pulled off part of a roof in New Jersey's Long Branch and uprooted a 40-foot tree outside a West Orange home. In downtown Jersey City, scaffolding swung off and away from a building at 15 Exchange Place; firefighters secured it, and there were no injuries, city officials said. Debris also flew from roofs of buildings in Manhattan. No one was injured. 

    By late afternoon, utility companies were reporting thousands of power outages, particularly on Long Island and in New Jersey. In New York City, several hundred customers were without power in Marine Park, Brooklyn, according to Con Edison. Most power was restored by Tuesday morning.

    What to know for Tuesday:

    • Wind advisory for coastal counties and New York City into Tuesday

    • Winter weather advisory for Dutchess, Putnam, Ulster, Orange, Sullivan, Pike, Sussex, and northern Passaic counties through Tuesday

    • Flood watch for most of the tri-state area into Tuesday morning

    • Coastal flood warning in effect through Tuesday morning for Ocean, Monmouth, Middlesex, Nassau, Suffolk, and southern Westchester counties, as well as Staten Island

    • Coastal flood advisory in effected into Tuesday morning for eastern Essex, eastern Union and southern Fairfield counties, as well as Brooklyn and Queens

    Copyright Associated Press / NBC New York


    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Tuesday, January 24]]>Tue, 24 Jan 2017 01:16:20 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC+11PM+AIRCHECK+M-Sun+-+23022228_WNBC_000000014761722+copy.jpgJanice Huff's weather forecast for Tuesday, January 24.]]><![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Monday, Jan. 23]]>Mon, 23 Jan 2017 19:43:00 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014759865_1200x675_861008451542.jpgJanice Huff and Dave Price with your early evening forecast for Monday, Jan. 23.]]><![CDATA[New Yorkers Wrestle With Wind, Rain as Nor'easter Bears Down]]>Tue, 24 Jan 2017 04:56:19 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/160*159/pole+wind.PNG]]><![CDATA[Forecast for Monday, January 23]]>Mon, 23 Jan 2017 07:22:16 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014747906_1200x675_860529219907.jpgChris Cimino and Raphael Miranda's forecast for Monday, January 23. A powerful nor'easter is in the forecast. Here's the latest.]]><![CDATA[Nor’easter Punishes Tri-State With Damaging Winds, Rain]]>Tue, 24 Jan 2017 01:51:44 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/tree+on+house+nj.jpg

    The front end of a powerful nor'easter brought hurricane-force gusts and punishing rain was plaguing the tri-state with intense winds -- ripping parts of roofs from buildings, toppling trees, suspending rail lines and delaying air travel.

    New York City, Long Island and parts of New Jersey and Connecticut were under a slew of weather advisories, watches and warnings. See the latest Storm Team 4 updates for your county and school closings.

    Track the storm using our interactive radar. 

    Winds howled across the region, churning sand along the Jersey Shore and parts of Long Island, where a downed utility pole prompted an LIRR suspension on the Port Washington Branch, and rattling windows of midtown skyscrapers. Gusts of nearly 45 mph were recorded in Central Park shortly after 10 a.m.

    In New Jersey, an overhead wire problem on the Amtrak-run tracks near Linden suspended service on New Jersey Transit's Northeast Corridor and North Jersey Coast lines at the outset of the evening rush. Service has since resumed, though the rail advises that customers will experience delays while passing through the Linden area. Newark's Penn Station was packed during the evening rush as a result of the backups and delays. 

    NJ Transit buses and private carriers are still cross-honoring tickets, as well as PATH trains. Check NJ Transit's website for the latest updates. 

    Amtrak also temporarily suspended service on its Northeast Regional and Acela Express trains traveling in New Jersey because of the downed wires. It has since been restored. 

    Some of the NJ Transit tracks in Hoboken Terminal flooded during high tide, but the water receded by evening. It didn't affect train service, officials say. 

    Elsewhere in New Jersey, winds pulled off part of a roof in Long Branch, and a 40-foot tree fell onto a home in West Orange, taking down power lines and piercing at least part of the roof. No one was hurt. In downtown Jersey City, a scaffolding swung off and away from a building at 15 Exchange Place; firefighters secured it, and there were no injuries, city officials said. 

    By late afternoon, utility companies were reporting thousands of power outages, particularly on Long Island and in New Jersey. In New York City, several hundred customers were without power in Marine Park, Brooklyn, according to Con Edison. 

    Rainfall and wind gusts strengthened into the evening, with gusts of more than 60 mph possible along the coast, Storm Team 4 says, causing debris to fly and turned improperly secured objects into potential projectiles. Throughout the afternoon, the FDNY responded to reports debris falling from buildings and scaffoldings, including onto cars on East 18th Street and on East 123rd Street between 2nd and 3rd avenues in East Harlem. In lower Manhattan, part of a scaffold collapsed at 199 Church St., and the company responsible for maintaining it was issued a violation by the city's buildings department for failing to maintain the structure, the city said. 

    Speed restrictions were implemented at some local bridges, including the Goethals and Outerbridge Crossing, as a precaution. 

    Instagram users posted videos of intense winds to the social media site; one post showed a dog unable to walk straight against the gusts, its fur flying around it, and another showed a woman who couldn't keep her hair in check. 

    While wind is the main story with this storm, it wasn't not the only problem. Wet, heavy snow fell on communities to the northwest of New York City Monday evening as rain, heavy at times, was drenching the city and its suburbs into Tuesday morning, Storm Team 4 says. Rain will be especially steady along the coasts of Long Island and New Jersey during this time period.

    If you're flying, expect airport delays and cancellations. LaGuardia, Newark and JFK airports urged customers to check with their carriers before heading out. Some of the airports reported anticipated arrival delays of more than two hours, and dozens of flights were canceled ahead of the worst of the storm. The Port Authority said AirTrain service at Newark Airport, where wind gusts of 49 mph were noted by 1 p.m., would be suspended until further notice; AirTrain service at JFK Airport remains operational for the time being. 

    Gov. Cuomo advised against unnecessary travel. Power companies planned for outages and the Seastreak ferry canceled rides Monday between New York and New Jersey.

    "As this storm could cause power outages across downstate and flooding for communities near the coastline, I am directing all relevant state agencies to be on alert and ready to respond to whatever Mother Nature throws our way," Cuomo said.

    On Tuesday, the winds will taper off and the day will be breezy and cloudy, with a few lingering showers, according to Storm Team 4. The weather improves rapidly on Wednesday with partly sunny skies and highs reaching 50 degrees. 

    What to know about this nor'easter:

    • A high wind warning is in effect for all coastal counties — including the five boroughs of New York City, Nassau, Suffolk, Middlesex, Monmouth and Ocean counties, as well as the eastern North Jersey and coastal Connecticut — from 1 a.m. Monday to 1 a.m. Tuesday. All other parts of the tri-state are under a high wind watch.

    • Around 1 to 3 inches of rain is expected throughout the tri-state area, with state officials estimating as much as 3 to 4 inches in the Long Island and Hudson Valley areas. The tri-state area is under a flood watch from 1 p.m. Monday until 6 a.m. Tuesday.

    • A coastal flood warning is in effect for Richmond, Nassau, Suffolk and Westchester counties, and a coastal flood advisory is in effect in the rest of the city and on the Jersey Shore overnight Sunday into Monday morning. A coastal flood watch is in effect for Nassau and Suffolk counties' south shores, as well as the forks of Long Island, for Monday afternoon and evening.

    • A storm warning is in effect for all local waterways from 1 a.m. Monday until 1 a.m. Tuesday.

    • A winter weather advisory is in effect for Dutchess, Putnam, Ulster, Orange and northern Passaic counties from 1 p.m. Monday to 7 a.m. Tuesday. A winter storm watch is in effect for Sullivan, Sussex and Pike counties during that time period.

    • Expect high winds and significant beach erosion, coastal flooding during high tide cycles, and localized wind damage at the coastline.

    • Wet, heavy snow is likely in higher-elevated areas, including Sullivan and Ulster counties in New York and Sussex County in New Jersey.

    • Anticipate periods of heavy rain throughout the city Monday, particularly during the afternoon and evening, when wind gusts are expected to hit 60 mph.



    Photo Credit: NBC 4 NY
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Monday, January 23]]>Mon, 23 Jan 2017 01:30:33 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014745708_1200x675_860440643698.jpgErica Grows weather forecast for Monday, January 23.]]><![CDATA[Storm Team 4's Forecast for the Coming Nor'easter]]>Sun, 22 Jan 2017 13:03:03 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014742707_1200x675_860159555968.jpgRaphael Miranda's forecast for January 22nd.]]><![CDATA[Storm Team 4's Forecast for the Coming Nor'easter]]>Sun, 22 Jan 2017 11:18:05 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014741657_1200x675_860095555573.jpgRaphael Miranda's forecast for January 22nd.]]><![CDATA[Forecast for Saturday, January 21st]]>Sat, 21 Jan 2017 08:25:33 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014737361_1200x675_859707971534.jpgRaphael Miranda's morning forecast for Saturday, January 21, 2017.]]><![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Friday January 20, 2017]]>Fri, 20 Jan 2017 20:34:00 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014734791_1200x675_859471939592.jpgJanice Huff's forecast for January 20.]]><![CDATA[Forecast for Friday, January 20]]>Fri, 20 Jan 2017 07:25:50 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014725860_1200x675_858969667649.jpgRaphael Miranda's weather forecast for Friday, January 20.]]><![CDATA[Forecast for Friday, January 20]]>Fri, 20 Jan 2017 00:49:41 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014720657_1200x675_858819139562.jpgJanice Huff's weather forecast for Friday, January 20.]]><![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Thursday January 19, 2017]]>Thu, 19 Jan 2017 21:25:31 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014719143_1200x675_858624067883.jpgJanice Huff's forecast for January 19.]]><![CDATA[Climate Change: Scientists Proving Theory as Fact]]>Thu, 19 Jan 2017 14:13:53 -0400

    Erica Grow is an AMS-certified meteorologist for NBC 4 New York's Storm Team 4. She sits on the American Meteorological Society's Board on Enterprise Communication. 

    It happened again — the Earth shattered another historic temperature record.

    According to a joint report from NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), last year was the warmest on record, with a global average temperature of 1.78 degrees Fahrenheit above the mid-20th century mean.

    This marks the third year in a row the planet has set a new record for global average temperature since NASA and NOAA began collecting measurements in 1880. Last year's record is even more surprising, since the "Super El Niño" that was attributed to 2015's record warmth ended last spring.  

    Despite a third straight year of record temperatures around the globe, some are still skeptical about climatologist claims that Earth's atmospheric conditions are changing.

    Scientists have proven that their theories are fact: our planet isn't just heating up, humans are making a sizable contribution to the warming process. Recent findings in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report note the clear impact of human influence on the environment and many of the "unprecedented" changes.

    It's been confirmed that human activity is causing a rise in global average temperature at breakneck pace. Yet the number of dissenting voices could create a real controversy. How is this possible? The complexity of the global warming process and the many ways it manifests itself are to blame.

    A crucial element to understanding global warming is recognizing that the process isn't linear. The world's oceans, which cover about 70 percent of Earth's surface, are a very efficient heat sink — natural oscillations cause our oceans to attract atmospheric heat and release it into the air in varying amounts. These oscillations can last for months, but others can persist for decades at a time. 

    Research has shown the oceans' capacity to ingest heat from air is a culprit in the notorious "pause" of the rise of global temperatures from 1999 to 2013, when temperatures were still warmer than the 20th century average. 

    Oscillations are a natural and ever-present part of our climate, something that's sparked suspicions as to whether our current warmth is just a part of Earth's natural ebb and flow.

    However, a closer look shows this is virtually impossible. Climatologists have created models that accurately replicate the temperature system since 1760. When these models are tested with the exclusion of industrial emissions, the global average temperature actually drops as time goes on, which means that if it were not for humans, Earth would be in a cooling period.

    The advances in climate modeling spanning decades are nothing short of remarkable. Today’s models can recreate conditions that cover centuries of data, yet they still struggle with a 10-day forecast. How could a 200-year forecast be better than a 10-day forecast? The answer is the difference between weather and climate.

    Imagine the differences as a baseball player. Weather is the player's single-game performance, whereas climate is his career batting average. It's much easier to predict where a player belongs in your lineup than it is to predict whether or not he will hit a home run in today's game. The same holds true for weather; meteorologists can more accurately predict changes in overall temperature systems than individual temperature records on a single day at a given location.

    While we do not know if the record high temperature that was reached yesterday occurred centuries ago, we do know what the overall climate was like a millenia ago by studying geological record keepers. These climate proxies show us that temperatures are rising faster than ever. 

    Global warming and climate are like a mosaic: up close, there are pieces that don't seem to fit the picture. Cherry-picked data, such as a periodic increase in sea ice in the Antarctic or inconsistent sea level rise in parts of the globe, are exploited as talking points to inject doubt about the validity of scientific findings on climate change.

    However, just as a mosaic's image becomes clearer with perspective, a full review of all the available data show a comprehensible picture of a climate that's heating up, and a human influence on the warming climate. The picture continues to become clearer with each year of record-breaking heat. 


    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
    <![CDATA[Forecast for Thursday, January 19]]>Thu, 19 Jan 2017 06:24:09 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014706578_1200x675_858058819619.jpgErica Grow's weather forecast for Thursday, January 19.]]><![CDATA[Forecast for Thursday, January 19]]>Thu, 19 Jan 2017 00:46:43 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC+11PM+AIRCHECK+M-Sun+-+23174313_WNBC_000000014703513+copy.jpgJanice Huff's weather forecast for Thursday, January 19.]]><![CDATA[Early Evening Forecast for Wednesday January 18, 2017]]>Wed, 18 Jan 2017 20:30:56 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014702216_1200x675_857745475536.jpgJanice Huff's forecast for January 18.]]><![CDATA[Forecast for Wednesday, January 18]]>Wed, 18 Jan 2017 06:28:40 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014685497_1200x675_857141827571.jpgRaphael Miranda's weather forecast for Wednesday, January 18.]]><![CDATA[Wednesday, January 18]]>Wed, 18 Jan 2017 01:39:52 -0400http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/WNBC_000000014683074_1200x675_857024579585.jpgJanice Huff's weather forecast for Wednesday, January 18. ]]>