Where Candidates Stand For Tomorrow's Primaries

Races to watch in tomorrow's elections

View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print

    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
    Who will make it to City Hall?

    Polls for the New York City primaries open in less than 24 hours and in some races, it's anyone's victory.

    Candidates for comptroller, the office responsible for city finances, are neck and neck, according to an August 26 Quinnipiac poll. The poll shows John Liu leading with 17percent of the votes, Melinda Katz and David Yassky trailing closely behind with 16 percent each, and David Weprin lagging with just 5 percent of the votes. If none of the candidates comes ahead with a clear victory (winning over 40 percent of votes), the top two candidates will move to a run off on September 29.

    The race for Manhattan district attorney will be another one to pay attention to. For the past 35 years legendary Robert Morgenthau has prosecuted some of the city's worst crooks and criminals. At 90-years-old, he won't be running for re-election, opening the seat up to democratic candidates, Richard Aborn, Leslie Crocker Snyder and Morgenthau-supported Cyrus Vance Jr., who are running a close race.

    Perhaps the most publicized race is that for mayor, which has been buzzed about since Michael Bloomberg announced his intentions to extend term limits last year. His fiercest competitors include Tony Avella who's predicted to take about 10 percent of the votes, and current comptroller, William Thompson, who Quinnapiac indicates will get 45 percent of the votes. Thompson is so confident of his victory, that he hasn't paid for any TV advertisements.

    For Public Advocate, Mark Green stands a comfortable 24 percentage points ahead of his next competitor, Bill de Blasio who can expect 14 percent of the votes.

    In most of the races -- those for Comptroller, Mayor, and a slew of city council seats -- the majority of those polled indicated that they don't know enough to say who they'd vote for. 

    For more on each candidate, in their own words, check out  NBC New York's Video Voter Guide.