The Mysterious Murder of a L.I. Motivational Speaker

Father of three found bound and stabbed in East Harlem

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Jeff Locker was discovered bound and stabbed behind the wheel of his car in East Harlem.

    Mystery surrounds the slaying of a Long Island motivational speaker found stabbed in his car just hours after calling his wife to say he'd be late because he was stuck in Harlem.

    "Listen, I'm running a little late because I got a flat tire near the Triborough Bridge," Jeff Locker's wife quoted him as saying, according to the New York Post.

    That would be the last time Lois Locker spoke with her husband.  Late Wednesday night, she called Nassau County cops to report her husband never made it to their Valley Stream home.

    NYPD cops found Locker, the father of two sons and teenage daughter, early Thursday morning slumped behind the wheel of his 2007 Dodge Magnum on Pauldino Avenue near 124th Street.  His hands were tied behind his back, a cord bound his neck to the headrest, and he had been stabbed several times, according to the New York Daily News.

    Cops were checking to see if the family man had a regular appointment with a prostitute in the nearby Wagner Houses, according to the News. A witness told the paper that they saw Locker stop at a deli on Second Avenue around 3 a.m. Thursday to buy condoms.

    "He got out of the car and bought a bottle of water and a pack of Trojan condoms. He seemed cool, relaxed," said Whitney Young, 19, told the News. "The next time we see him, he's here dead."

    In his conversation with his wife, Locker casually mentioned that a man and woman were helping him with the flat, according to the Post, which led investigators to theorize he may fallen victim to a good Samaritan scam in which seeming do-gooders are actually setting a trap.

    According to his website, Locker worked with business people, coaching them to be their best.

    "Locker is an inspirational keynote speaker known as the business spiritualist: he is committed to bringing more peace - joy and fulfillment to sales people, managers, executives, entrepreneurs, and professionals, his Web site said.

    "He probably trusted someone," his mother-in-law, Annette Serota told the News. "He was a very trusting person. That's probably how it happened. You could sell him the Brooklyn Bridge."