Teen's Car Sale Linked to Terror Scare

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Getty Images
    A member of the police department points to a surveillance image of a dark SUV, pictured at right, which is said to be the vehicle with a bomb that was discovered before it could be detonated in Times Square on May 2, 2010 in New York City. The vehicle was loaded with propane, gasoline and fireworks and had begun to detonate but hadn't exploded.

    When a 19-year-old Bridgeport, Conn. college student sold her Nissan Pathfinder over the Internet, the man who bought it said he was just going to visit friends in New York.

    Authorities believe that Peggy Colas actually sold her SUV to was Shahzad Faisal, the man accused in the botched car bomb in Times Square, the New York Post reports.

    The Hartford Courant spoke with a source who said Colas, a student at Post University in Waterbury,  told authorities she met the man at a mall on April 28. He gave her $1,300 in cash and took the car.

    Colas’ brother told the Post that the buyer "talked very softly, and he said he was just going to drive around and visit friends in New York."

    What Led to Arrest of Shahzad

    [HAR] What Led to Arrest of Shahzad
    A Nissan Pathfinder led police to a suspect in the New York car bomb scare. (Published Tuesday, May 4, 2010)

    The license plate on the SUV had been stolen from a Connecticut junkyard, officials said, but a Vehicle Identification Number in the car's engine led investigators to the former owner, who was the last person on record to be officially associated with the SUV.

    That sale has led to a nightmare of a week for the Connecticut teen, something news sources say she has posted on Facebook.

    Faisal Shahzad to Appear in Court Today

    [HAR] Faisal Shahzad to Appear in Court Today
    The man arrested in connection with New York bomb scare has two known residences in Connecticut. (Published Tuesday, May 4, 2010)

    Her family told The Post that investigators fingerprinted her and took the "for sale" sign that had been posted on her Pathfinder so they could check it for other prints.

    When the Post visited Colas’ home, she did not comment, but her mother said she is scared.

    "My daughter's nervous," her mom told the newspaper. "She doesn't want this guy coming after her."