Talking Hack Smack: New Website for Taxi Gripes

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    NEWSLETTERS

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    Taxis line up on 7th Avenue to pick up passengers at Penn Station during the taxi strike on September 5, 2007 in New York City.

    A new website allows passengers to vent frustrations with bad taxi service, although don’t expect the gripes to go very far.

    Formerly, New Yorkers mad at cabbies had to rely on whatever impromptu string of epithets they could sew together on the spot  (or – hah! – call 311) but now there’s taxihack.com, the Post reveals, which allows riders to tweet and email their rage.

    The site lets you post the cab’s medallion number and detail whatever problems you had with the service.

    One typical message went: “Emailer #10 4n82 Around 34 st in Manhattan, indicating available for service but, LOCKED DOORS, then refused service for 6 blocks to a movie theater b/c he was "heading other direction." Said I'd report him (to taxi hack!) and he said "do you like me, baby?" repeatedly. AVOID.”

    The website’s creator calls it a quicker and more informal way to file grievances, without the wasted time and bureaucracy of the city’s official complaint line.

    “This way, you won’t have to take a day off from work to make you point,” developer Randy Meech told the Post.  “You’ll also be able to learn information about individual drivers, companies or cabs that used to be hidden.”

    Cabbies weren’t very fond of the tool.

    “This is a lousy Web side,” said driver Arthur Oulatov. “But I don’t think this is going to affect business, because people need taxis.”

    TLC Commissioner Matthew Daus still advised people to call 311.

    “People sharing taxi stories sounds very entertaining, but if anyone has questions complains, or has lost property in a taxi cab, the appropriate way to go is … calling 311,” he told the Post.