Exclusive: Subway Conductor Slumps Over on Train, MTA Investigates

The probe comes after NBC 4 New York aired another video from a viewer showing a train worker not appearing to be alert while on the job

View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print

    NEWSLETTERS

    In a follow-up to NBC 4 New York's exclusive, the MTA says it is investigating video of a subway conductor slumped over in his seat. Andrew Siff reports.

    NBC 4 New York has obtained video showing a subway conductor slumped in his seat with his head down on an uptown 1 train as it rumbled along late last week.

    The MTA says it is investigating.

    Subway Conductor Slumps Over on Train

    [NY] Subway Conductor Slumps Over on Train
    NBC 4 New York has obtained video showing a subway conductor slumped in his seat with his head down on an uptown 1 train as it rumbled along late last week. Katy Tur reports.

    The probe comes after NBC 4 New York aired a video from a viewer last week showing a train engineer reading a newspaper instead of looking at the tracks as he operated a morning rush hour Metro-North train to Grand Central Terminal.

    Days after that report aired, another viewer contacted the station with concerns after seeing the 1 train conductor leaning over and resting his head. That conductor was observed at about midnight last Friday.

    Andrew Alpert, the chair of the New York City Transit Riders Council, an MTA oversight body, said the recent allegation was not as glaring or egregious as last week's incident because in that case, the engineer was actually driving the train.

    The subway conductor in this latest video, Alpert said, is responsible mainly for opening and closing train doors.

    "We don't know for how long he was nodding off, if in fact he was nodding off," said Alpert. "We don't know for how many stations that was -- was it just one station, and the guy just happened to capture it on his cell phone? We just don't enough. So when you don't know enough, you give the gentleman the benefit of the doubt."

    The MTA said in a statement Wednesday that the video shows the conductor "did not appear to be alert, but it's unclear from this angle whether he was actually sleeping. We are investigating this incident and will take appropriate action."

    Get the latest from NBC 4 New York anytime, anywhere. Follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Google+. Get our apps here and sign up for email newsletters here. Get breaking news delivered right to your phone -- just text NYBREAKING to 639710. For more info, text HELP. To end, text STOP. Message and data rates may apply.