Pieces of WTC Steel Head to Towns Across the Nation

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    NEWSLETTERS

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    Given the worldwide attention that the 10th anniversary of the attacks is going to get next year, I think I would have thrown up some two-by-fours, draped them in canvas and painted a skyscraper on them. Just for now

    Town by town, in more than a thousand communities throughout all 50 states, residents are getting small squares of steel from the debris that was the World Trade Center in New York City until the morning of September 11th, 2001.

    Nine years after the terorist attacks toppled the Twin Towers, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which own the Ground Zero site,  is shipping the roughly one- foot square pieces to towns, schools, police and fire departments to use as their own memorials to the worst terrorist attack on U.S. soil.

    "This is not for us just a piece of steel," said Bill Baroni, Deputy Executive Director for the Port Authority, at a ceremony in Monroe Township, N.J. just three days before the ninth anniversary of the attack.

    WTC Steel Heads to Communities Across the Nation

    [NY] WTC Steel Heads to Communities Across the Nation
    Town by town, in more than a thousand communities throughout all 50 states, residents are getting small squares of steel from the debris that was the World Trade Center.

    Among those at the Monroe ceremony was Wendy Feinberg-Kotula, who lost her husband Alan Feinberg when his FDNY fire company(Engine 54) was among the first responders that morning.

    "I hope people can come and touch and feel and remember that day," said Feinberg-Kotula following the brief ceremony in the fire house.

    Interestingly, the Port Authority had to get the approval of a federal judge for each and every section going to each and every community, according to Lieutenant Governor Kim Guadagno, who was also at the Monroe ceremony.

    "Because that's evidence of a crime," Guadagno explained, and then added "Never forget that this piece of steel was located at a crime scene.

    Monroe's section of steel will go in a display case at the District Three firehouse.

    And the Port Authority said 1026 other pieces have been approved for other communities.

    That has special meaning for the Fire District's Jerry Kaplan, 68, a retired electrician who helped build the World Trade Center in the early 70's.

    "It's something that will always touch my heart," said Kaplan.

    Follow Brian Thompson on Twitter @brian4NY