NYPD Says No Immediate Threat After Libya

Police are beefing up patrols at Jewish institutions around the city for the high holy days, which begin sundown on Sunday until nightfall on Sept. 28th

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    NEWSLETTERS

    The Muslim community in the tri-state is joining in the condemnation of US Ambassador to Libya Chris Stevens and three staff members. Brian Thompson reports. (Published Wednesday, Sep 12, 2012)

    Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly says there is no immediate threat to New York City following the deadly attack on the U.S. consulate in Libya, but the department is watching closely.

    The commissioner said Wednesday the killing of Ambassador Chris Stevens and three others shows we live in a dangerous world. He says he's trying to determine if there are implications for New York but doesn't see any immediate threat.

    Police are beefing up patrols at Jewish institutions around the city for the high holy days, which begin at sundown on Sunday with Rosh Hashanah.

    Stevens, 52, was killed when he and a group of embassy workers tried to help evacuate staff who came under attack by a mob. Three other American foreign service workers died, including an information management officer named Sean Smith, a married father of two young children.

    The precise circumstances that prompted the attack remained unclear Wednesday. So do the causes of the Americans' deaths.

    The identities of the other two dead Americans—both employed by the State Department—were being withheld pending notification of next of kin.

    Speaking Wednesday, President Brack Obama said the victims "represent the very best if the United States of America."

    He added: "I have no doubt that their legacy will live on through the work that they did far from our shores, and in the hearts of those who love them back home."

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