NYC Replacing Street Signs to Improve Readability

Feds say mixture of uppercase and lowercase letters, new font makes signs easier to read

Thursday, Sep 30, 2010  |  Updated 12:42 PM EDT
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NYC Replacing Street Signs to Improve Readability

Christie's

New York City has started to make changes to its street signs to comply with new federal regulations.

The Federal Highway Administration says switching from uppercase letters to a combination of upper and lower will improve safety. It says studies show motorists find it easier to read lower case signs.

The city has 250,000 street signs and the cost to replace each is about $110. Overall, the project will cost about $27.5 million. The city Department of Transportation says it will have 11,000 changed by the end of this fiscal year. It says the city already replaces about 8,000 signs a year due to wear.

Municipalities across the country have until 2018 to make the changes.

The federal regulations also require a change in street sign's font to a specially designed typeface called Clearview.

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