Metro-North Riders on New Haven Line to Get Rebates After Power Failure: MTA

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    TK

    Metro-North riders on the heavily traveled New Haven line will get partial refunds for monthly and weekly passes after a power failure last week, officials announced Tuesday.

    Metro-North's New Haven line was crippled during morning rush hour last Wednesday after a Con Edison feeder cable failed, causing the rail line to lose power between Grand Central Terminal and Stamford, Conn.

    Crews have been working around the clock to bring service back to the line, which services dozens of communities in New York and Connecticut as far east as New Haven, but the railroad can still only accommodate about 50 percent of its normal ridership.

    Metro-North Commuters Cope With Reduced Service on New Haven Line

    [NY] Metro-North Commuters Cope With Reduced Service on New Haven Line
    Service on the Metro-North New Haven line is at about half its normal volume Monday after a power failure last week. Katherine Creag reports.

    The MTA said a rebate for pass-holders after a service disruption is very rare. MTA Chairman Thomas Prendergast said the credits were approved because of the "magnitude and duration" of the failure.

    The New Haven line should be fully restored by Oct. 7 or Oct. 8, about a week earlier than initial estimates.

    MTA: Service on Metro-North New Haven Line at Half Volume Monday

    [NY] MTA: Service on Metro-North New Haven Line at Half Volume Monday
    MTA officials announced a plan Sunday to provide additional service on the Metro-North New Haven line to accommodate about half its normal volume in time for the Monday morning rush after a Con Edison feed loader failed Wednesday, disrupting service for tens of thousands of commuters in New York and Connecticut. Brynn Gingras reports

    Riders have until March 31 to claim their credits. The MTA said weekly pass-holders will likely get a full credit and those with monthly passes will be pro-rated.

    Con Edison said Monday that the failure might have been caused by work being done to another, disconnected, feeder cable along the line. Normally, the lines are fed by multiple feeder cables, but the utility disconnected one and was freezing insulating oil that houses the feeders in pipes. The ground around the pipes was also frozen, leading to the failure, authorities have said. 

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