NYPD, FBI to Help Investigate Uganda Terror Bombing

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    NEWSLETTERS

    AP
    Damaged chairs and tables amongst the debris strewn outside the restaurant "Ethiopian village" in Kampala, Uganda, Monday, July 12, 2010 after an explosion at the restaurant late Sunday. Simultaneous explosions tore through crowds watching the World Cup final at a rugby club and an Ethiopian restaurant, killing more than 70 people including one American, officials said. Police feared an al-Qaida-linked Somali militant group was behind the attacks. (AP Photo/Marc Hofer)

    New York's Finest will be among the law-enforcement officials looking into to the deadly terror attacks in Uganda.

    NYPD officers, along with FBI agents from the New York office, will be helping Ugandan authorities investigate Sunday's blasts targeting crowds watching the final game of the World Cup. One American aid worker, Nate Henn from Delaware, was killed in the explosions that claimed at least 74 lives.

    Members of the New York FBI's Joint Terrorism Task force left Tuesday morning to try  to learn more about the bombings.

    Five NYPD officers are also en route to try to learn about the attacks and the group behind it.  A sixth NYPD officer, who was in South Africa monitoring security at the soccer tournament, is also traveling to Uganda to assist in the investigation, NYPD Deputy Commissioner Paul Browne said.

    The Somali terror group known as al-Shabab has claimed responsibility for the attacks. The Islamic extremist organization has been fighting to try to increase its power in Somalia. Al-Shabab has been threatening attacks against African countries like Uganda that sent troops to try to help protect Somalia's weak central government.

    Ugandan police on Tuesday reportedly stopped another terror plot outside a popular nightclub. Police said they stopped a suspect with a suicide-bombing vest before he could explode the device.

    Al- Shabab said the group planted bombs on Sunday which killed dozens of people as they watched the final of the World Cup. A spokesman said the attacks were a response to the peacekeeping activities Ugandan troops are carrying out in Mogadishu.