Pair Steals Identities at Doc Office to Buy NBA Playoff Tickets, Vacations: Officials

The couple allegedly used patients' information to order new debit cards

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    NEWSLETTERS

    A 26-year-old Staten Island woman who worked at a doctor's office is accused, along with her fiance, of stealing bank account information from dozens of patients who were then charged for lavish purchases, including NBA playoff tickets and trips to the Caribbean and Disney World. Brynn Gingras reports.

    A 26-year-old Staten Island woman who worked at a doctor's office is accused, along with her fiance, of stealing bank account information from dozens of patients who were then charged for lavish purchases, including NBA playoff tickets and trips to the Caribbean and Disney World.

    Amanda Zieminski worked for eight years at the office of South Shore Physicians, where authorities say she stole personal information that was used to request new debit cards from banks. The cards were sent to her fiance and alleged accomplice's home in the Bronx, and were then used to withdraw cash and make thousands of dollars in purchases, including money orders, gas and tickets to the 2012 Eastern Conference Finals between the Boston Celtics and Miami Heat in 2012.
    Authorities say the 29-year-old fiance, Clyde Forteau, is seen in Facebook photos sitting in expensive seats at the playoff game and other sporting events, including field level at a Jets football game. The tickets were all bought with stolen money, prosecutors allege.
    He and Zieminski are also seen in Facebook photos on a trip to Disney World, where they got engaged at Cinderella's castle.
    "I'm living a fairy tale!!" Zieminski posted on Facebook, according to officials.
    "This story does have a fairytale ending -- for law enforcement," said Staten Island District Attorney Daniel Donovan Jr. "These two defendants and their accomplices preyed on unsuspecting victims and used stolen monies to pay for luxuries to which they were not entitled."
    Their lawyers did not immediately respond to requests for comment.
    Prosecutors say investigators obtained warrants to eavesdrop on their cell phones, and learned Forteau was also targeting elderly patients and using their information to file false tax returns to get refunds, sometimes posing as a Hurricane Sandy victim to explain why his address had changed.
    Police found more than 50 credit cards and more than 20 stolen or fake driver's licenses in a car used by Forteau and his brother.
    Zieminski, Forteau and his brother face multiple charges.