DOI Investigator Cited for Ethics Violations

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    NEWSLETTERS

    AP

    An investigator in New York City's top watchdog agency was found in violation of several ethics laws and demoted from his post as a result, according to a disposition released by the Conflicts of Interest Board.

    It is believed to be the first time that an employee from the Department of Investigation has been the subject of a conflict of interest disposition.

    COIB concluded that David Jordan, a deputy inspector general, misused his position and city time for his own benefit while working as a sales representative for a private business.

    Jordan worked at ACN, a multi-level marketing sales company, while working as a city investigator over a nine-month period in 2009 and 2010, according to COIB. Jordan tried to sell products to employees, get them involved in his sales operations and used office resources to conduct sales demonstrations, all of which would have earned him commission from ACN.

    Jordan was demoted and reassigned to an administrative role in the department. In addition to his demotion, Jordan, who made $92,401 in 2009, received a $15,000 salary cut. 

    Jordan did not return messages seeking comment.

    The Department of Investigation works in conjunction with COIB to examine and rule on cases of alleged violations by city workers. Together, the two agencies issue dozens of penalties every year, ranging from public warnings to small fines to permanent expulsion from working in city government.

    A Department of Investigation spokeswoman aid the agency carried out the investigation of Jordan on its own.

    "DOI determined there was an issue with an otherwise value employee, addressed it with penalties that were severe, and referred the case to COIB for action as it deemed appropriate," said Diane Struzzi.