<![CDATA[NBC New York - Local News]]>Copyright 2017http://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local http://media.nbcnewyork.com/designimages/4NY_Horizontal.jpg NBC New York http://www.nbcnewyork.comen-usWed, 28 Jun 2017 01:54:20 -0400Wed, 28 Jun 2017 01:54:20 -0400NBC Owned Television Stations <![CDATA[Subway Derailment Caused by 'Improperly Secured' Rail: MTA ]]> Wed, 28 Jun 2017 01:21:49 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/AP_17178762018966.jpg

A subway train that derailed Tuesday as it entered a station, tossing people to the floor and forcing hundreds of shaken-up passengers to evacuate through darkened tunnels was caused by an "improperly secured piece of replacement rail" that was stored on the tracks, New York City transit officials said.

"Storing equipment in between tracks is a common practice employed by railroads across the country to accelerate rail repairs," the MTA said in a statement late Tuesday. "The key to this being an effective and safe practice is making sure that the extra equipment is properly bolted down, which does not appear to have happened in this case."

The MTA said crews are inspecting "every inch of rail" to ensure that every replacement part "is properly stored and secured." The MTA also says crews will be working throughout the night to try to restore normal service by Wednesday morning's commute.


Tuesday morning's derailment and power outage near the 125th Street station in Harlem suspended service on multiple train lines, stranding terrified riders in darkened, smoke-filled cars for two hours in some cases.

At least 34 people had injuries including smoke inhalation, though all were expected to be OK, fire officials said. About half of the victims were taken to hospitals while others were assessed at the scene. 

MTA Chairman Joe Lhota said at a news briefing shortly before noon Tuesday that the brakes on the southbound A train went into emergency mode, propelling the first two cars of the eight-car train into a concrete wall and off the tracks. Sparks erupted, briefly igniting garbage and other debris along the subway tracks, causing heavy smoke but no serious fire, Lhota said.

The derailed train was evacuated, along with two other trains -- one ahead of it and one behind it. The train derailed very close to the 125th Street station, Lhota said, and some riders were able to get off on the platform. Other panicked straphangers looked for alternate means of escape.

"In that moment, you're stuck underground, you are buried alive," passenger Dominique Simone later told News 4. "And I think that's the scariest part of it." 

Photos posted to social media show passengers walking along the tracks in a dark subway tunnel, using their phone flashlights as a guide. Firefighters are seen illuminating the way. The MTA urged stranded riders on other trains not to get off their subways and to wait for directions from crew.

Major subway service changes were in effect for more than half a dozen lines most of the day. Though local service was restored on the A, B and D lines by the start of the evening rush, commuters were bracing for delays. The C train remains suspended. Click here for real-time updates. 

The derailment caused significant damage to the track, switch system and tunnel, dramatic photos released by the union showed. The MTA says crews will need to work overnight into Wednesday to remove the derailed train and make repairs. They're hoping to restore normal scheduled service in time for the morning rush.

"It’s a serious derailment, with quite of bit of damage to signals and some structural damage to the walls," TWU Local 100 Vice President for the Maintenance of Wayn Division Tony Utano said in a statement. "Our members are working as fast and safely as possible to bring the system back to normal."

At least 100 workers are at the scene, Utano said.

Gov. Cuomo called the derailment "an unacceptable manifestation of the system's current state."

"It is my expectation that with new leadership brought by Joe Lhota, the MTA will address the fundamental issues plaguing the transit system and overhaul the organizational structure of the MTA," Cuomo said.


Passengers describe the train vibrating wildly and bucking as it went off the rails. One rider described the experience as "probably the most terrifying 15 minute of my NYC life."

One man told NBC News he initially thought the jerking was just a part of his normal subway commute. Then the shaking intensified. He says he saw what he thought at first was an explosion. All the lights went out. The train stopped.

Like many other riders, he feared the train was on fire. Someone kicked out the glass of one of the locked car doors, but the next car was locked. So he jumped to the tracks. 

"I'm thinking, 'I just want to be off this train,'" the rider said. "And that’s scary too because you don’t know what’s going on, on the tracks."

"Mostly everyone was shaken up and nerves frayed, but once we started walking there was smoke, so people started coughing," said Craig Sheil. 

The derailment spoiled what should've been a bright day for the system, coming roughly two hours before the reopening of a subway station at the southern tip of Manhattan that had been closed since it was flooded by Superstorm Sandy in October 2012. The South Ferry station on the No. 1 line reopened after $340 million worth of repairs.

The derailment comes amid a series of breakdowns, signal failures and other issues that have left straphangers at their breaking point. On Monday, the subway rider whose horrifying account of being stuck on a sweltering, powerless train earlier this month went viral held a news briefing to demand the MTA outline an evacuation procedure for riders who may get stranded in the future.

It also comes less than two weeks before the start of Amtrak's summer-long work to repair aging infrastructure at New York Penn Station, a project that is expected to increase subway volume as commuters seek alternatives.

A report this month found rush hour cancellations and delays on the Long Island Rail Road at the highest level in 10 years.



Photo Credit: AP
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<![CDATA[Moore Writes $10K Check to Theater Behind Trump 'Caesar']]> Tue, 27 Jun 2017 21:28:40 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/michael-moore-flint.jpg

Filmmaker Michael Moore wrote a check for thousands of dollars to the New York-based arts organization that drew fire for its performance of “Julius Caesar,” which included the assassination of a Trump look-alike. 

In a statement, Moore said he wrote the check for $10,000 to The Public Theater and became a sponsor of its free Shakespeare in the Park program after the firestorm surrounding the production earlier this month.

Right-leaning activists, and even Trump’s son, Donald Trump Jr., criticized the play as encouraging violence against the president and his supporters. Protesters even took to the stage and disrupted the play on multiple occasions.

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“In a time like this, it is important that we stand up against any attempts to censor art or free expression, especially by denying this expression the funding that it needs,” Moore said in the statement published to his Facebook page on Tuesday evening.

The statement also says Moore has pledged to raise more money for this summer’s Public Theater productions in Central Park.

Starting in July, Moore will stage his first theatrical even on Broadway, “The Terms of My Surrender.” On Tuesday, he said on Twitter, “I'm donating my total advance pay from my B'way show to Shakespeare in the Park after conservative media bullied Corp sponsors 2 pull out.”

It appeared the left-wing filmmaker was most bothered by the decision of Bank of America and Delta Airlines to pull their sponsorship of the play as the controversy boiled.

“Neither I nor anyone else in the theater should feel intimidated by what's happened here or ever worry about how much control certain sponsors or investors have over our work,” Moore's statement said. 

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Moore, known for such documentaries as “Bowling for Columbine” and “Fahrenheit 9/11,” has been an outspoken critic of Trump and is working on a new film criticizing him and his administration.

The Public Theater’s “Caesar” production has garnered intense criticism since it opened. Earlier this month, a 24-year-old activist was arrested after she rushed the stage shouting “Stop leftist violence!” And two 28-year-old men were arrested after storming the stage and shouting "Liberal hate kills!"

Police are investigating threats made to the wife of the director of the production, which ended its run on June 18.



Photo Credit: Getty Images/File
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<![CDATA[Westchester Announces Plan to Fingerprint Uber, Lyft Drivers]]> Wed, 28 Jun 2017 01:08:07 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/NBC+News+Channel++VOD.jpg

Ride-sharing services is coming to Westchester County after all. 

Westchester County Executive Robert Astorino is launching the first-in-the-nation program to bring services, such as Uber and Lyft, to the area while making sure riders are safe, he announced Tuesday. 

Astorino announced the solution by creating a voluntary pool of fingerprinted drivers the ride-sharing companies could hire. 

Working with Lyft and Uber, Astorino developed a plan that will enable residents to know whether their driver’s background screening includes a fingerprint check.

The new program is called "Thumbs Up" and participating drivers whose fingerprints do not show a criminal background will issued a thumbs up decal issued by the county to be placed on their windshield, according to the announcement. 

“Ride sharing is not supposed to be hitchhiking with an app,” Astorino said in a statement. “The public has the right to know that the driver picking them up has been fully screened for a criminal record."

In addition to supporting the program, Lyft and Uber said they would make technology available to the county to help with traffic management and work with the county on potential revenue opportunities at county facilities, such as the Westchester County Airport.

Beginning Wednesday, interested drivers can be finger-printed with results returned and entered into a database within two to three days. Drivers who pass will be issued the decal to be placed in their windshield. 

The program comes after the county considered opting out of ride-sharing services, with Uber fighting back. 

Uber put out a full-scale campaign in the form of radio ads, mailers and emails to current app users, calling the proposed block a "secretly-rushing" ban on "affordable, reliable transportation options."

"Banning Uber would make Westchester one of the only counties in the country without ridesharing. We will do whatever it takes to ensure that residents understand the consequence of the county's actions and have the opportunity to make their voices are heard," said Alix Anfang, a spokesperson for Uber.

Counties with more than 100,000 residents, like Westchester, are allowed to opt out of the services. 



Photo Credit: Westchester County]]>
<![CDATA[No Operator Chosen to Run Ferry During Penn Repairs]]> Tue, 27 Jun 2017 19:24:46 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/No_Operator_Chosen_to_Run_Ferry_During_Penn_Repairs.jpg

LIRR commuters have been promised special ferry service from Glen Cove to the East Side of Manhattan to help ease their commute during the overhaul of Penn Station this summer, but there's one major problem with the plan. Pei-Sze Cheng reports.

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<![CDATA[NJ Fire Department Mourns Firefighter Killed in Cliff Fall]]> Tue, 27 Jun 2017 19:21:50 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/paterson+fire+dept+mourns+kerry+rivera.jpg

Members of a New Jersey fire department were in mourning Tuesday for a fellow firefighter killed in a mountain biking accident the day before.

Kerry Rivera, 49, was a nearly 14-year veteran of the Paterson Fire Department. His colleagues described him as a stand-up father of three, a football coach and a Sunday school teacher.

Deputy Chief Kevin Hancock said bike riding was a new passion of Rivera’s.

“His brother was really trying to get them involved in mountain biking and his brother was an avid rider,” Hancock said.

On Monday morning, Rivera was biking with his brother on a trail at the 157-acre Mills Reservation in Cedar Grove when he rode his bike off a cliff, falling at least 20 feet into a ravine below.

Hancock said he saw Rivera at the end of his shift Monday. He was wearing his biking gear and ready to hit the trails.

“We had coffee in the morning,” Hancock said. “He was a happy guy. He was one of those guys — there’s probably not a person who knew Kerry who would have a bad thing to say about Kerry.”

The flags were at half-staff at his firehouse on Tuesday and black bunting hung over the doors.

Chief Michael Pastorino said a fire department is like an extended family, and his death hits hard at his second home.

“His immediate shift is hurting, his company is hurting. But we will be here for each other and will move forward,” Pastorino said.

Mills Reservation would have been a challenge for Rivera, a firefighter who had hip surgery about a year ago. But Rivera loved his job and had come to love biking. He wasn’t one to give up.

“He came back from that operation and you wouldn’t have been able to tell from the injury,” Pastorino said.

Mills Reservation has a number of hiking trails, including one that leads to a cliff overlooking the New York City skyline. Biking isn't allowed on the trails, but neighbors say people do it anyway. One man was seen being turned away by police when he tried to pedal in just two hours after the accident.

The exact circumstances surrounding the fall remain under investigation, although authorities have called it an accident.

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<![CDATA[Family of Man Convicted in Murder of NY Cop Wants New Trial]]> Wed, 28 Jun 2017 00:28:58 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/siegal+man+seeks+new+trial.jpg

Seventeen years after a man was convicted of murdering a police officer, his family is demanding a new trial, alleging that the Manhattan district attorney’s office purposely withheld evidence.

Jon Adrian Velazquez has been serving time in prison for the killing of retired NYPD officer Alfred Ward in 1998.

On Tuesday, Velazquez’s attorney, Robert Gottlieb, filed a motion asking for a new trial. He cited information from a police report, as well as a detective interview of an important witness. He believes the evidence could have proven Velazquez’s innocence had it been released at the original trial.

“What Mr. Velazquez did not know is that he had been victimized by a prosecutor who deliberately withheld significant information that our United States constitution requires be disclosed,” Gottlieb said.

A statement from the Manhattan District Attorney’s office refuted any accusations of prosecutorial misconduct.

“The suggestion that this office concealed any information is false. The existence of the police report in question was disclosed to the defendant’s legal team in 1999 prior to the trial,” the statement read.

According to the DA’s office, the police report was not only made available for the original trial in 1999, but also in 2013, when they looked into the possibility of a wrongful conviction. The DA, along with multiple courts that had previously heard the case, ultimately determined Velazquez’s conviction should stand.

During the 1999 trial, Velazquez had a co-defendant, Derry Daniels, who pleaded guilty to the murder. In a police report, Derry’s father had described seeing a man with features similar to Velazquez’s with his son before the murder.

A sketch was drawn up based on witness descriptions of the gunman—a light-skinned black man with cornrows. Velazquez is Latino, but did not have any braids.

“(Derry’s father) had observed his son Derry just a few hours before the murder hanging out with a man matching exactly the physical description of the shooter,” Gottlieb said.

Velazquez’s mother, Maria, continues to insist on her son’s innocence. “I know for a fact because he was on the telephone with me—and I testified. I was his alibi,” she said.

Velazquez called her from prison after the hearing and said that he is hopeful.

“It’s just ridiculous how we continue to go through this. We continue to unveil this evidence and show beyond a doubt that I’m an innocent man,” Velazquez said.

Actress Alfrie Woodward is among the handful of celebrities who have joined his mother to publicly call for his conviction to be overturned.

“I will never, never stop the fight. I will keep coming back again and again and again until he is free,” Maria said.

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<![CDATA[Board Votes to Increase Rent for Rent-Stabilized New Yorkers]]> Wed, 28 Jun 2017 01:04:06 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/AP_100420028563.jpg

The city’s Rent Guidelines Board passed a rent increase for rent-stabilized New Yorkers — the first increase in two years.

The board voted 7-2 at a contentious meeting Tuesday night to allow landlords to increase rent for some 1.6 million people living in rent-stabilized apartments in New York City.

The board permitted a rent increase of 1.25 percent for one-year leases and a rent increase of 2 percent for two-year leases.

More than 200 people packed the meeting hall Tuesday, chanting and demanding rent be kept the same or lowered. They left disappointed. 

The outcome does not raise rent on all rent-stabilized apartments in the city, but allows landlords to raise rent by the percentage voted on.

The change in rent guidelines takes effect on Oct. 1.

Tuesday’s decision was seen as a compromise that frustrated both sides; tenants are mad rent is going up, and landlords say the increase isn’t high enough.

Two advocates for tenants on the board said the increase for one and two-year leases are the “best possible option” in lieu of the larger increases that landlords had wanted. Tenants in attendance wanted another freeze on rent.

Two advocates for landlords on the board were the only no votes. They wanted landlords to be able to raise rents higher. They argued that taxes and operating costs have gone up for building owners.

Melissa Grace, a spokesperson for Mayor de Blasio, released a statement more or less supporting the outcome, which avoided a larger increase in rent.

“We will never go back to the days when the landlord lobby got big rent hikes regardless of what the data said,” the statement read. “Taken together, the past four years have seen the lowest guidelines in history — including the first two freezes ever.”

In 2015, the board voted on a 0 percent increase for one-year leases — the city's first-ever "rent freeze." In 2016, it voted for another freeze on rent. 

At a preliminary vote in April, the board had recommended 3 percent and 4 percent increases on one and two-year leases.

Under the new guidelines, a rent-stabilized tenant paying $2,500 per month will see his or her rent go up $30 per month. For those paying $2,500 on two-year leases, the rent will go up by $50 per month. 

Jaime Steinberg, of the Bronx, was furious after Tuesday's vote. He says he can't afford the increase that was passed. 

"I'm retired with $1,000," he said. "I gotta pay my rent, food and everything."

Jack Freund, of the Rent Stabilization Association, a group representing landlords, was also angry, but for a different reason. He said building owners are being squeezed.

"It's a totally inadequate increase in terms of real estate taxes that constantly go up and other operating costs," Freund said. "Owners can't maintain their real estate taxes and maintain their buildings."

That's no consolation for Steinberg, who worries he's being priced out of New York. 

"They're killing the ones that can't defend themselves," Steinberg said. 



Photo Credit: AP/File]]>
<![CDATA[2 Injured When Car Flips Over in Brooklyn ]]> Tue, 27 Jun 2017 20:01:34 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/Derrick+Hall+car+flips+brooklyn.jpg

Two people were hurt when a car flipped upside down in Brooklyn on Tuesday evening, fire officials said.

The white Toyota sedan flipped over at Ralph Avenue and Fulton Street in Bed-Stuy around 6:30 p.m. It wasn't immediately known what caused the vehicle to upend. 

Photos from the scene show the car overturned in the middle of Fulton Street. A crowd of residents and firefighters are seen surrounding what appears to be an injured woman.

It’s unclear if the two injured people were passengers in the car or pedestrians on the street.

One person was taken to Saint Johns Medical Center and the other was taken to Kings County Hospital, according to fire officials. They were both in stable condition Tuesday night.




Photo Credit: Derrick Hall]]>
<![CDATA[Subway Derails in Manhattan; Chaos Erupts, Dozens Hurt]]> Wed, 28 Jun 2017 01:21:01 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/fdny+photo+rescue.jpg

A subway derailment and power outage near the 125th Street station in Harlem suspended service on multiple train lines Tuesday, stranding terrified riders in darkened, smoke-filled cars for two hours in some cases.

At least 34 people had injuries including smoke inhalation, though all were expected to be OK, fire officials said. About half of the victims were taken to hospitals while others were assessed at the scene. 

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MTA Chairman Joe Lhota said at a news briefing shortly before noon Tuesday that the brakes on the southbound A train somehow went into emergency mode, propelling the first two cars of the eight-car train into a concrete wall and off the tracks. Sparks erupted, briefly igniting garbage and other debris along the subway tracks, causing heavy smoke but no serious fire, Lhota said.

The derailed train was evacuated, along with two other trains -- one ahead of it and one behind it. The train derailed very close to the 125th Street station, Lhota said, and some riders were able to get off on the platform. Other panicked straphangers looked for alternate means of escape.

"In that moment, you're stuck underground, you are buried alive," passenger Dominique Simone later told News 4. "And I think that's the scariest part of it." 

Photos posted to social media show passengers walking along the tracks in a dark subway tunnel, using their phone flashlights as a guide. Firefighters are seen illuminating the way. The MTA urged stranded riders on other trains not to get off their subways and to wait for directions from crew.

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Major subway service changes were in effect for more than half a dozen lines most of the day. Though local service was restored on the A, B and D lines by the start of the evening rush, commuters were bracing for delays. The C train remains suspended. Click here for real-time updates. 

The derailment caused significant damage to the track, switch system and tunnel, dramatic photos released by the union showed. The MTA says crews will need to work overnight into Wednesday to remove the derailed train and make repairs. They're hoping to restore normal scheduled service in time for the morning rush.

"It’s a serious derailment, with quite of bit of damage to signals and some structural damage to the walls," TWU Local 100 Vice President for the Maintenance of Wayn Division Tony Utano said in a statement. "Our members are working as fast and safely as possible to bring the system back to normal."

At least 100 workers are at the scene, Utano said. Meanwhile, Lhota says the investigation is focusing on why the brakes went into emergency mode.

"This, to the best of my knowledge, does not look like a failure on the part of equipment, does not look like a failure on the part of the track itself," he said. "We need to determine what it is."

Lhota pledged a thorough investigation.

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Passengers describe the train vibrating wildly and bucking as it went off the rails. One rider described the experience as "probably the most terrifying 15 minute of my NYC life."

One man told NBC News he initially thought the jerking was just a part of his normal subway commute. Then the shaking intensified. He says he saw what he thought at first was an explosion. All the lights went out. The train stopped.

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Like many other riders, he feared the train was on fire. Someone kicked out the glass of one of the locked car doors, but the next car was locked. So he jumped to the tracks. 

"I'm thinking, 'I just want to be off this train,'" the rider said. "And that’s scary too because you don’t know what’s going on, on the tracks."

"Mostly everyone was shaken up and nerves frayed, but once we started walking there was smoke, so people started coughing," said Craig Sheil. 

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The derailment comes amid a series of breakdowns, signal failures and other issues that have left straphangers at their breaking point. On Monday, the subway rider whose horrifying account of being stuck on a sweltering, powerless train earlier this month went viral held a news briefing to demand the MTA outline an evacuation procedure for riders who may get stranded in the future.

It also comes less than two weeks before the start of Amtrak's summer-long work to repair aging infrastructure at New York Penn Station, a project that is expected to increase subway volume as commuters seek alternatives.



Photo Credit: @AD_commit
This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
<![CDATA[In Pictures: Subway Panic After Train Derailment]]> Tue, 27 Jun 2017 20:40:10 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/subway+smoke+credit+nrik_nyc+2.jpg A derailment at the 125th Street subway station in Harlem caused panicked riders to flee the station Tuesday. Social media lit up with photos of darkened tunnels and massive crowds.]]> <![CDATA[Touching Immigrant Stories Told Over Pay Phone in NYC]]> Tue, 27 Jun 2017 17:53:18 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/Touching_Immigrant_Stories_Told_Over_Pay_Phone_in_NYC.jpg

Most New Yorkers probably haven't picked up a pay phone in years, but in Times Square, they're making a comeback. That's where people can hear some moving immigrant stories. Gus Rosendale reports.

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<![CDATA[Indicted Paterson Mayor, DPW Workers Decline Deal, For Now]]> Tue, 27 Jun 2017 19:20:57 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/LMX___THOMPSON+MAYOR+TORRES+ARRAIGNMENT+NJ+PKG+430_WNBC_0000000.jpg

Paterson Mayor Jose "Joey" Torres returned to criminal court Tuesday for a hearing in his ongoing corruption case. 

The mayor of New Jersey's third largest city is accused of using city workers to do private construction work at a relative's planned beer business, all the while billing taxpayers. He was arrested in March

Three Department of Public Works employees -- Joseph Mania, 51; Timothy Hanlon, 30; and Imad Elmowaswes, 52 -- are also facing charges in the case, and they've been offered a no-jailtime deal if they cooperate with prosecutors against the mayor.

But both the mayor and the workers decided in the Jersey City courthouse Tuesday that they would continue to fight the corruption charges. The workers have until September to decide whether to go to trial or to take the deal. 

Defense lawyers said in court they needed more time to go over the grand jury evidence, including the hours of video that show the mayor and DPW workers doing work at the planned beer business and time sheets that allegedly show how taxpayers paid for private work. 

Torres has held at least two fundraisers to pay for his legal team, including one on a yacht attended by city employees, friends and local businessmen. It was clear he was in no mood to speak to the I-Team when cameras showed up outside one of them. 

After court Tuesday, the mayor again declined to disclose how much money he has raised or how is spending all the money he is privately raising. 

At the next court hearing in September, Torres is expected to say whether he'll take the plea offer of five years in prison and whether the DPW workers will take the offer of no jail time. 



Photo Credit: NBC 4 NY]]>
<![CDATA[New Push for Answers in 2016 Central Park Blast Mystery]]> Tue, 27 Jun 2017 19:35:04 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/Connor+Golden+Blue+Background+Look+N.jpg

Last summer's mystery explosion in Central Park is never far from the minds of ATF Special Agent Pete D’Antonio and NYPD Detective Andrew Cohen. 

Both men are fathers. And neither can imagine the pain of seeing a child lose a limb. 

The pair of investigators took the I-Team back to the scene of the July 3, 2016 blast that claimed Connor Golden’s lower leg. The individual who left the explosive compound has never been apprehended. And D'Antonio and Cohen are calling on the public to help heat up the year-old cold case. 

On that fateful summer day, Golden, then a University of Miami freshman, jumped off a rock formation near the Central Park entrance by Fifth Avenue in the vicinity of 60th Street. When he landed, the device someone had left on the ground blew off his lower leg. Connor now walks with the help of a prosthesis. 

Although Cohen and D’Antonio have viewed hours of surveillance video and countless images, they have not been able to track down the elusive suspect.

"We will find them. We're looking for them," Cohen said.

D'Antonio said what happen to Golden strikes a chord.

"What makes it a little harder for me is that I have three children that are around Connor’s age," he said. It could have happened to any of my own kids stepping off that rock."

For fear of inspiring copycat explosions, both the NYPD and ATF have avoided naming the specific compound that blew off Golden's lower leg. Investigators say at this time, they have no evidence to indicate the explosion was linked to foreign or domestic terrorism. Golden's family is skeptical.

Last fall, in an exclusive I-Team interview, Connor Golden's family expressed doubt the explosion could have been a mistake or an accident.  

"These explanations that somehow someone was playing with these materials in the park makes no sense to me,” Kevin Golden, Connor's father, said at the time. “In one of the most watched areas of the country ... you don't go there with this volatile compound that is explosive on contact."

Connor Golden has so far declined to speak publicly about the blast that took his lower leg, but his family has become increasingly concerned that the unsolved explosion case is fading from public consciousness. The family has tried to use a GoFundMe page to reach out to the public directly. They’ve also raised more than $85,000 for future medical expenses not covered by insurance.

The I-Team was first to reveal how insurance claims for Connor’s prosthesis have been denied and delayed.

With no person or group claiming responsibility for the explosion, Cohen and D’Antonio believe there is at least one way to warm up this cold case: They want new images of those Central Park rocks. 

The investigators believe members of the public almost certainly have photographs or video on their phones of the days and hours before the explosion. If those images have the rock formation in the background, they could help narrow down exactly when the explosive compound was placed on the ground. With a more precise time frame, investigators may have better luck pinpointing the person who brought the explosive into Central Park. 

"If they were around here during that time frame, that’s what we want them to reach back into. We want them to look at photos that they have," Cohen said. 

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<![CDATA[Woman's Body Recovered From Brooklyn Waters: NYPD]]> Tue, 27 Jun 2017 14:09:17 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/nypd+harbor+unit+2.jpg

Police say they've recovered a woman's body from the Gowanus Bay in Brooklyn Tuesday.

Someone called 911 shortly after 11 a.m. to report a body floating in the waters of the bay, near Buttermilk Channel, just off Red Hook. 

The NYPD Harbor Unit responded and recovered the body of the unidentified woman and brought her to Pier 44, where EMS pronounced her dead. 

The medical examiner will determine the cause of death. 



Photo Credit: NBC 4 NY]]>
<![CDATA[Student Brings Gun to School in Brooklyn: Police]]> Tue, 27 Jun 2017 15:52:06 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/CHOPPER+12PM+gun+in+school+-+12444719_WNBC_000000016806611.jpg

A 12-year-old student was found with a gun inside a middle school in Brooklyn Tuesday, authorities say.

The student brought the unloaded 9-mm gun to JHS 50 John D. Wells school on South 3rd Street in Williamsburg, according to police. He showed it to another student, and a teacher got wind of it.

School officials searched the student's bag and found the gun. He was taken into custody and brought to the 90th Precinct stationhouse, police said. 

A Department of Education spokeswoman said in a statement, "This serious incident was immediately reported and the NYPD swiftly and safely reovered the item."

"We're working closely with the NYPD as they conduct an investigation, and we'll ensure the school takes appropriate follow-up action," she said. 

Messages have been left with the Department of Education and the NYPD. 



Photo Credit: NBC 4 NY]]>
<![CDATA[Nicki Minaj Gets the Key to Queens]]> Tue, 27 Jun 2017 12:48:47 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/nickikey.jpg

She'll never have to worry about getting locked out of her hometown.

On Monday, Nicki Minaj was presented with the key to the Queens, the borough in New York City.

“This is a #MajorKeyAlert I just got the #KeyToTheCity” she tweeted yesterday, less than 24 hours after a devastating loss to rival Remy Ma at the BET Awards.

Although she was born in Trinidad and Tobago, Minaj considers herself a proud native of the Jamaica neighborhood in Queens.

As a teen, the rapper attended Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music and Arts, where she was able to foster her passion for music.

Minaj has never been shy about sharing where she got her start. She even made sure to include a shoutout to her beloved hometown on the song “Moment 4 Life.”




Photo Credit: Getty Images
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<![CDATA[ISIS Supporters Hack Website of Long Island Town]]> Mon, 26 Jun 2017 21:40:45 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/pro+isis+message+brookhaven+site.jpg

The website of a Long Island town was among dozens of sites hacked by ISIS sympathizers over the weekend, officials said.

Cryptic messages posted on the hacked site warned President Trump and the American people that they will be held accountable “for every drop of blood flowing in Muslim countries.”

The site also included a pro-ISIS banner and the line: “I love Islamic State.”

The website — brookhavenny.gov — was still down on Monday night, more than 24 hours after pro-ISIS messages showed up on the site on Sunday afternoon.

Brookhaven’s leadership took down the entire web page on Sunday, and it was still down on Monday night. A visit to the site returns a Domain Name System (DNS) error. Brookhaven Deputy Supervisor Dan Panico said the site was expected to be back up by Tuesday.

Brookhaven’s police department wouldn’t comment on the hack, but residents were stunned and concerned to hear of the hack.

“Now it makes it real,” Greg Brown said. “We watch it on the news all the time, now it’s here.”

“It’s scary, very scary,” said Erin Zahn. “To have it this close to home.”

It’s unclear when the hackers hatched the plan or why they targeted Brookhaven’s site. It’s also unknown if they managed to get any sensitive information.

The same pro-ISIS messages appeared on 75 other pages around the world, including government websites for Ohio and Maryland. The Department of Public Safety said the FBI and U.S. Department of Homeland Security are investigating the hacks. The Suffolk County Police Department’s cybercrime unit is taking part in the investigation of the Brookhaven hack.

The hack is part of ongoing cyberterrorism that has impacted governments and corporations across the globe.

“They’ve done this in the past,” Brookhaven Deputy Supervisor Dan Panico. “I know the federal officials are meeting with us because they are still trying to catch them.”

Authors of the website "Cryptosphere," which tracks hackers worldwide, have detailed dozens, if not hundreds, of similar hacks in recent years by the so-called Team System DZ, which they called a "pro-ISIS hacker crew" and claim are based in Algeria.

Impacted websites, they said, have included those for a synagogue in Florida, the student union at the University of New Brunswick in Canada, for UK Rugby and a number of websites on Wordpress.

Some see these types of hacks — sometimes called "defacement" — as simply a nuisance, though in some instances, they have been disruptive to work and government life.

But others see cause for alarm. "Wake up freedom-loving Americans. Radical Islam infiltrating the heartland," Josh Mandel, the Ohio treasurer and a Republican candidate for U.S. Senate, said in a tweet Sunday.

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<![CDATA[Drunk, High Ambulette Driver Crashes 2x During Transport: PD]]> Tue, 27 Jun 2017 20:32:10 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/160*120/ambulette.JPG

A 45-year-old ambulette driver was drunk and high when he smashed into two utility poles at two separate accident sites while transporting a dialysis patient on Long Island Monday, authorities say. 

Nassau County police say Pedro Aponte was taking the patient from a home in Queens to a treatment center shortly before 10 a.m. when he hit a utility pole on Greenwich Avenue near Nassau Road and fled the scene. As officers were responding to a call about that accident, another 911 call came in about an ambulette striking another utility pole a third of a mile away. 

Fred Thomas was sitting on his porch when the ambulette came crashing into the pole. 

"At first I heard a big bang, and the wires were shaking," Thomas said. "And I saw an ambulance crash into the pole right there." 

Officers responding to the second scene found the ambulette heavily damaged, the utility pole fractured and Aponte lying on the ground. Aponte, who police say appeared to be intoxicated, was taken into custody and brought to a hospital for evaluation of possible additional drug use and chest pain. 

The patient, a 77-year-old male, suffered rib injuries during the collisions and was taken to a hospital for treatment. He is expected to survive. 

Minnet Jackson, of Roosevelt, is a health care worker. She said the incident is troubling to her. 

"I'm concerned for the life we put into these people's hands," she said. "This is a sick man he's transporting — drunk. Come on now." 

Aponte, who was admitted to the hospital, faces charges including driving while ability impaired (combination of alcohol/drugs), leaving the scene of an incident and reckless endangerment. Arraignment is pending, and police are waiting on results of toxicology tests. 

It wasn't immediately clear if Aponte had retained an attorney. 



Photo Credit: NBC 4 New York]]>
<![CDATA[You'll Soon Be Able to Park on the Sand at this NJ Beach]]> Tue, 27 Jun 2017 07:59:51 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/Wildwood+Baker+Ave+Beach.jpg

Forget lugging all those beach chairs, umbrellas and shovels for blocks and blocks to the beach if you own an SUV and sun in Wildwood, New Jersey.

The seaside resort just approved an ordinance to allow drivers to park directly on the sand in a new beach lot the city is creating.

The lot will be at the E. Baker Avenue beach, which is between the Wildwoods Convention Center and Morey's Adventure Pier.

Parking will be limited to drivers who own a vehicle with four-wheel drive. Daily rates will run $10. The price will jump to $20 for special events, the city said. The lot will be monitored by an attendant.

The resort's beaches are extra long compared to other towns leaving visitors to take long treks from the street to the shore. The change should cut down on some walking. City officials also say it will generate revenue.

Wildwood isn't the first south Jersey Shore town to permit beach parking. Brigantine started offering sand lot parking in 2007.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Watch: Gabe Pressman Honored at Memorial Service]]> Tue, 27 Jun 2017 17:17:58 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/gabe+slate.jpg

In celebration of a journalistic icon and in honor of his lasting contributions to the city he loved, NBC 4 New York hosted a special memorial service for Gabe Pressman on Tuesday at 30 Rockefeller Plaza.



















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<![CDATA[Bayonne Bridge Demolition Stops As Debris Rains Down on SI]]> Tue, 27 Jun 2017 05:57:44 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/IMG_02182.jpg

It’s raining debris on Staten Island.

Port Richmond neighbors say small pieces of wood, cement powder and bolts have been falling from above because crews are working on the Bayonne Bridge, but Monday seemed to be the worst many have seen yet.

“I can’t believe it happened, it was only a matter of time,” John Ortiz, of Port Richmond, said. “If it's going to put a dent into a car, God forbid what it would've done to me.”

The Bayonne Bridge project consists of demolishing the old one and building the new one. But lately people said chunks of concrete and shattered glass are flying down onto their heads and onto Newark Avenue below. That work has been suspended, according to the Port Authority. 

The Port Authority says just before 10 a.m. Monday, a contractor was demolishing a pier when a chunk of concrete fell to the street below, damaging three cars.

“They dropped stones from the tip of the bridge in the demo,” said Vaughn Bellocchio, owner of Polishing Pad, an auto body shop. “They busted a bunch of holes in the cars.”

Ortiz is so fed up he said it is just another day in the neighborhood.

“We have bolts that fall down and that just rain from the sky,” Ortiz said.

Ortiz snapped pictures of the damage and video of the cleanup. It shows crews working on the bridge back on June 9th.

Now the demolition is on hold, Port Authority said.

“We are currently undertaking a full evaluation of today’s incident with our contractor to learn exactly what happened and to determine a proper course of action moving forward," Steve Coleman of Port Authority said in a statement.

The Port Authority will meet with the contractor before picking up the demolition and is also working with the owners of the damaged cars to fix them.

“I got my daughter with me and she’s six months old and I definitely fear for her life,” Ortiz said.



Photo Credit: John Ortiz]]>
<![CDATA[Iconic ‘Mitzvah’ Bus Found Burned in Brooklyn]]> Mon, 26 Jun 2017 22:42:25 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/mitzvah+bus+2.jpg

The “mitzvah” bus, a symbol of Jewish pride in Brooklyn, was destroyed in a fire over the weekend, police said.

The repurposed school bus, decorated elaborately with religious imagery, was a prominent cultural fixture in Crown Heights.

The charred shell of the bus was all that remained on Monday.

Leviticus Schieber, the owner of the bus, used the vehicle as both an art studio and to transport his two daughters to school. He considers the vehicle a community message on wheels.

“It represents the Jewish spirit and sort of old-school Crown Heights,” Schieber said.

The rolling art project has appeared in many New York parades, and most recently, it was featured in a music video by Benny Friedman, a popular Jewish entertainer, in his hit song “I’m Jew and I’m Proud.”

Some people believe the wreckage could be more than just a case of property damage—authorities are currently considering the possibility that it’s also a hate crime.

Schieber has his own suspicions.

“My first instinct was that it was targeted for some reason, maybe just because it’s a funny-looking bus,” he said. “But it’s obviously the only bus on this block that’s destroyed.”

Schieber frequently parked his bus on the street and had no concerns doing so, but he said he did find one of its tires slashed about a year and a half ago.

Schieber said the practical issues aren’t his main concern; he’ll get another bus since his was insured, and he won’t have to transport his daughters to school this summer.

But he worries this act of vandalism may give other vandals ideas.

While the fire department initially ruled the damage to be a product of an electrical fire, they are now investigating other causes, as well as motives.


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<![CDATA[60,000 NYC Customers Lose Internet After Vandals Cut Cable]]> Tue, 27 Jun 2017 08:49:59 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/spectrum2.jpg

About 60,000 Spectrum customers in Queens were without cable or internet on Monday after vandals cut a fiber optic cable serving four major hubs, according to the cable company and the borough's president.

Spectrum was working to restore cable, internet and phone services to thousands of customers more than 15 hours after vandals cut the fiber optic cable, Queens Borough President Melinda Katz said. It had been restored by late in the evening, the cable company said early Tuesday.

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Police have not released information about their investigation into the destruction of the fiber optic cable. 

The outage began around 2 a.m. Monday and spread across central Queens. No other borough appeared to be affected. By around 11 p.m. Monday, it still wasn't fully restored. 

Around 4 p.m., Spectrum tweeted: “Queens, NY customers, our technicians are continuing to work to restore services. We appreciate your patience.”

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Katz said it was “unacceptable” that Spectrum didn’t provide any information to its affected customers for more than 12 hours.

Dozens of people took to Twitter to vent about the problem throughout the day Monday; many of them directed their tweets at @Spectrum and @Ask_Spectrum, two accounts run by Charter Spectrum. 

Some of the users said the lack of internet or phone service was having a major effect on their businesses. 

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“The Spectrum outage in Queens is costing massive amounts of money,” one user wrote.

Others lamented infrastructure in the city or fumed about the length of the outage. 

“The fact one line gets cut and Queens is without service is unacceptable,” wrote one user. 

For a Queens grocery store, Universal Food, Monday was cash only, resulting in a big hit, according to the owner. 

"Phone and internet has been down all day," he said. "As a result, a lot of business has been lost." 

(Disclaimer: NBCUniversal is owned by Comcast, a competitor of Charter Spectrum.)

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Photo Credit: @vinzilla45/Twitter
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<![CDATA[Subway Changes in Effect: Get Real-Time Updates Here]]> Tue, 27 Jun 2017 16:56:10 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/crowded+subway+platform+yankee+stadium.jpg

A subway derailed at 125th Street in Manhattan Tuesday, sending panicked riders fleeing the train and walking the tracks to safety. More than a half-dozen subway lines saw major service changes for most of the day, and though service was slowly returning for the evening rush, delays are possible and more changes could be in store. 

The MTA says local service will be restored on the A, B and D lines by 5 p.m., but the C line remains suspended. 

Platform controllers have been dispatched to help customers at the 34th Street-Herald Square, 59th Street-Columbus Circle, 125th Street, 161st Street and 168th Street stations, the MTA says. 

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MTA officials said the derailment caused damage to the tracks and the switch system, and emergency repairs are required overnight into Wednesday. They're hoping to restore normal service in time for the morning rush. 

We've got you covered with real-time updates right here.

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Photo Credit: @RealAlexNovelo
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<![CDATA[Driver Arrested After Car Crashes Into Mom, 3 Kids in NY]]> Tue, 27 Jun 2017 07:54:41 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/rockland+county+crash+inset+albert+gomez.jpg

The driver of a vehicle that crashed into a mother and her three children in Rockland County on Monday afternoon has been arrested, police said. 

The 38-year-old mother was pushing her infant in a stroller at the side of Route 59 in Monsey when a 1999 Toyota Corolla crashed into her and her two girls as they walked. (There are no sidewalks where the four of them were hit.)

The driver of the Toyota, 62-year-old Albert Gomez, was later arrested and charged with a number of crimes, including felony assault in the second degree. He was also charged with assault in the third degree, reckless endangerment and reckless driving. 

Gomez was not injured in the crash and was held on a $150,000 bail. It's unclear if he has an attorney who can comment on the charges.

It's not clear how the crash unfolded. Witness Joel Rabinowitz told News 4 that he was driving directly behind the Toyota, and that he believes road rage led to the crash. 

Rabinowitz says the Toyota was cut off by a white vehicle, and that the driver of the Toyota then tried to pass the white vehicle along the berm, crashing into the family as they walked. 

"The silver Corolla, the driver of the car, threw a cup out of the window, was driving pretty erratically," Rabinowitz said. 

Rabinowitz says he did not see the actual crash, and his account has not been confirmed by police. Nevertheless, he was resolute, telling News 4: "This was definitely road rage." 

Part of the stroller was seen overturned at the side of the road shortly before 4 p.m. The Toyota had front-end damage and was parked several yards away from the stroller, as was the white vehicle mentioned by Rabinowitz. 

Sources said one of the children, a 3-month-old infant, went into cardiac arrest after the crash, which happened around 3 p.m. at the intersection of Route 59 and Robert Pitt Drive. 

The infant suffered traumatic injuries and was taken to Nyack Hospital by medevac. CPR was performed on him at the scene before he was flown away by helicopter, according to police and sources. He was later transferred to Westchester County Medical Center. 

The woman's daughters — a 13-year-old and a 9-year-old — were also seriously injured in the crash, police said. They were taken to Westchester County Medical Center, according to police. They remained in serious condition Monday night. 

Aron Wieder, a member of the Rockland County Legislature, posted video of the scene to Twitter shortly after the accident. 

"You see that carriage — that's a carriage from a beautiful, little child who was just involved in a car accident," Wieder says in the video. "[He] and [his] mother and [his] siblings were involved in a terrible accident." 

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Wieder told News 4 that he has been asking the state to do something about the lack of sidewalks in the area for years. 

"As recently as a month ago, I'd written to the state, and I told them, there are no sidewalks, not on this side of the road, not on this side of the road," Wieder said, pointing to both sides of Route 59. 

"This is a busy intersection; you have the mall over here, you have shopping centers, cleaners — and they have ignored us," he said. 

The crash remains under investigation.


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<![CDATA[Photos Released of Duo Wanted in Killing of Man Pumping Gas]]> Tue, 27 Jun 2017 06:58:12 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/cms846.jpg

Police have released more surveillance photos of the two suspects wanted in connection with the deadly shooting of a man pumping gas in Brooklyn. 

The 46-year-old man, identified as Keith Vereen, of Queens, was shot to death in Crown Heights as he pumped gas around noon on June 17 at a BP station on Atlantic Avenue, police said. 

He was shot once in the chest, officials said. He was taken to Kings County Hospital where he was pronounced dead. 

Police are looking for two men who are about 19 or 20 years old in the shooting. 

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The suspected shooter was captured on surveillance video at the gas station, wearing a black hoodie with a cigarette dangling from his mouth, police said.

The second suspect was pictured running away from the gas station in a red shirt and black pants. Both men got into a silver Infiniti vehicle and fled.


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<![CDATA[After Subway Nightmare, Rider Wants Evacuation Protocol]]> Tue, 27 Jun 2017 09:43:17 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/subway+rider+stuck+train+wants+new+protocol.jpg

The subway rider whose horrifying account of being stuck on a sweltering, powerless train earlier this month went viral is demanding the MTA outline an evacuation procedure for riders who may find themselves similarly trapped in the future. 

Michael Sciaraffo says the experience of being stuck on the packed F train for nearly an hour without any power, ventilation and communication made it clear how much riders are literally kept in the dark when it comes to train emergencies. 

"Sadly, how to escape from a subway tunnel is information that few citizens in NYC know or understand," he says. "No one outside of MTA personnel and possibly some first responders know the basics of safety within the tunnels of the subway system." 

Sciaraffo, who's on a one-man campaign to get the governor, state lawmakers, city council members, federal officials, MTA officials and congressional representatives to overhaul the aging subway, held a news conference Monday afternoon on the matter.

"As it stands right now, if you ask a subway rider what they should do in an emergency on a train, you will get a blank stare," he told News 4. "For a city that has drilled into our heads to 'see something, say something,' we should also be exposed to an ad campaign with pamphlets, ads and diagrams on train cars, platforms and stations."

"It would be better to do this now, instead of waiting for someone to die first during an unexpected emergency," he says.

Sciaraffo points to the Washington, D.C. metro system as an example of a big-city mass transit agency that explicitly shows riders how to escape a train in case of an emergency like a terrorist attack, power failure, fire or flood emergency. 

But the MTA warns that leaving such critical emergency protocol in the hands of riders presents huge dangers. 

"In emergencies, customers should always heed the advice of their train's crew," MTA spokeswoman Beth DeFalco said Monday. "Customers should never leave a train on their own -- it's dangerous and potentially deadly and it requires us to shut down entire lines and delay thousands of other customers because of the safety hazard it presents."

The risk posed by leaving subway doors unlocked was illustrated recently when straphangers faced a morning of crippling systemwide delays: two fed-up commuters hopped off a stalled train and onto the tracks to walk to the next station. An MTA spokesman said at the time, "With a live third rail and the possibility of the train moving at any time, this individual could have been seriously injured or worse." 

But for Sciaraffo, staying on board the stifling F train on June 5 didn't feel safe, either. 

"There was no air conditioning," he said. "For 45 minutes, we sweated and panicked and figured how would we get off this train." 

"We were in deathly danger. Another 20 minutes, somebody would have been hauled off dead," he claimed.

It's not just a subway evacuation plan that Sciaraffo wants the MTA to work on; he says the 1970s R46-model F train that broke down that night had doors that wouldn't unlock even during the emergency. And there was no way for riders to open an emergency exit themselves. 

Sciaraffo says he's aware that the old F train cars are longer, making it much easier for a person standing between train cars to fall off when the train is turning on a curve: "That's why those doors are locked. It's not MTA protocol to unlock the doors because they don't want hundreds of people emptying into the extremely dangerous subway tunnel." 

"However, there was no way to get a door open to breathe, given what we had to work with," he continues. 

There was also no rider-accessible exit on the roof of the train or a removable window, and there was no way to communicate with the conductor, he says. 

"To deprive passengers of the ability to rescue themselves in an emergency situation is inhumane and frankly, if not already illegal, then it should be," he said. "There are supposed to be emergency exits." 

The stress of a crumbling subway system with more passengers than ever — 5.6 million weekly in 2016 — has caused the number of train delays to triple during the past five years, to 70,000 per month.

MTA Acting Executive Director Ronnie Hakim said last week she's ordered a top-to-bottom review of the latest round of subway delays. Gov. Andrew Cuomo has also appointed Joe Lhota as chair of the MTA, and the MTA has promised to improve the way it communicates with customers. 

The MTA was already in the midst of rolling out a $20 million plan to deploy a rapid response team to fix signals and switches when they break. 



Photo Credit: Michael Sciaraffo and Chelsea Lawrence
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<![CDATA[Remembering Gabe Pressman: Highlights of His Memorial]]> Tue, 27 Jun 2017 18:37:25 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/gabe+slate.jpg

In celebration of a journalistic icon and in honor of his lasting contributions to the city he loved, NBC 4 New York hosted a special memorial service for Gabe Pressman on Tuesday.

Pressman, a New York icon and pioneering reporter whose local broadcast career spanned more than six decades, died Friday at the age of 93.

A Who's Who of New York public life past and present remembered Pressman, from Cardinal Timothy Dolan (who read from the Book of Psalms) and former Rep. Charlie Rangel, to NBC legend Tom Brokaw and former police commissioners Ray Kelly and Bill Bratton. 

"For me, Gabe was the foundation of what reporting is about," said Brokaw, who anchored the NBC Nightly News for more than two decades. 

The two-hour ceremony also featured heartfelt remembrances by his wife Vera, sons Mark and Michael and daughter Liz.

Liz Pressman, a news librarian at the New York Post and the only one of his children to follow their father into the news business, recalled their shared love of news as the thing that united them, even in the toughest of times.

"What's the wood?" her father would call her and ask, she said. (The front page of New York tabloids is often called "the wood" in the business.)

Credited with being the first television reporter in New York, Pressman called NBC 4 New York home for more than half a century. He is survived by his wife, four children, eight grandchildren and his great grandson.


Chuck Scarborough Remembers Gabe Pressman

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Fellow Journalists Remember Gabe Pressman

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Gabe Pressman's Interns Honor Their 'Mentor and Friend'

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In Pictures: His Life and Iconic Career 

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A Glimpse at New York City Through His Eyes 

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Gabe Pressman Recalls Childhood in the Bronx 

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Remembering 'Freedom Summer' 

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Remembering Woodstock

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<![CDATA[Brother Dies in Cliff Fall at New Jersey Park ]]> Tue, 27 Jun 2017 06:49:35 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/cliff+rescue+nj+fall.jpg

A man has lost his brother after a morning bike ride ended in a fatal fall down a cliff in New Jersey. 

Essex County officials said two brothers were mountain biking on a trail within a 157 acre county park in New Jersey Monday morning when one accidentally rode off a cliff, falling at least 20 feet into a ravine.

A woman who lives near the Mills Reservation, Debbie Cocoziello, said she was startled awake by someone screaming for help. The man screaming for help turned out to be the brother of the 49-year-old victim. 

Authorities were seen hauling a stretcher covered in a white sheet from a ravine at Mills Reservation in Cedar Grove at 11:30 a.m., about two hours after the initial report came in about the fall.

The reservation has a number of hiking trails, including one that leads to a cliff overlooking the New York City skyline. It is maintained by the Essex County Park Commission.

Biking isn't allowed on the trails at the Mills Reservation, but neighbors say people do it anyway. One man was seen being turned away by police when he tried to pedal in just two hours after the accident. 

"It's a ravine, it's not meant for something like that but the kids do it," said a neighbor named Caroline. 

Other neighbors who live along the Cedar Grove-Upper Montclair border say they've worried about the park cliffs for years. There's no fence there, just a sheer drop.

Eddie Kloss says he never takes his three young children near the cliff: "It's too dangerous, there's no fence or anything." 

The exact circumstances surrounding the fall remain under investigation, although authorities have called it an accident.



Photo Credit: NBC 4 New York]]>
<![CDATA[Travel Ban Battle Continues Despite Partial Victory]]> Mon, 26 Jun 2017 20:45:57 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/Travel_Ban_Battle_Continues_Despite_Partial_Victory.jpg

Tonight the White House is claiming victory, but the travel ban matter is still not fully resolved. Gus Rosendale reports.

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<![CDATA[LIRR Deal for Summer of Hell Gets Mixed Reactions]]> Mon, 26 Jun 2017 19:26:09 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/LIRR_Deal_for_Summer_of_Hell_Gets_Mixed_Reactions.jpg

Some LIRR riders will get discounts during the overhaul of Penn Station this summer, but others won't. It depends on whether or not commuters are being diverted during the months of work. Pei-Sze Cheng reports.

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<![CDATA[Local Impact of Senate Health Care Bill]]> Mon, 26 Jun 2017 19:22:49 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/Local_Impact_of_Senate_Health_Care_Bill.jpg

If the Senate's health care bill becomes law, what will it mean for New Yorkers? The Congressional Budget Office says the bill is good for the deficit but bad for Americans at risk of losing insurance. Melissa Russo reports.

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<![CDATA[LIRR Ticket Discount Debate]]> Mon, 26 Jun 2017 18:21:02 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/LIRR_Ticket_Discount_Debate.jpg

Pei-Sze Cheng is in Hunter's Point, Queens with details on a train ticket deal that has some commuters rejoicing and other outraged.

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<![CDATA[Getaway Driver Sentenced in Deadly NJ Mall Carjacking]]> Mon, 26 Jun 2017 18:16:08 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/dustin+friedland+inset.jpg

The getaway driver convicted of murder in the carjacking death of a young Hoboken attorney at a New Jersey mall in 2013 has been sentenced to life in prison. 

Basim Henry was found guilty in March of murder and other felony charges in the shooting death of Dustin Friedland, who was killed in front of his wife in The Mall at Short Hills parking lot just 10 days before Christmas in 2013.

Henry had been the first of four men to go on trial in Friedland's death. 

At sentencing Monday, Henry declined to offer a defense of his actions and didn't express remorse. He smiled at the judge at one point. 

Friedland's widow, Jamie Schare Friedland, who testified during the trial, addressed Henry during sentencing.

"Your intentional decision -- it wasn't just someone's car," she said in tears. "It was someone's life. You stopped my life that night. You did real, lasting, permanent damage."

Friedland's mother, Rose Friedland, called Dustin a "perfect husband, cherished brother, beloved son." 

The murder charge alone carried a sentence of 30 years to life in prison. Henry was on probation at the time of the killing, and the judge at sentencing said if released, Henry would almost certainly commit another crime. 

Henry won't be eligible for parole until he's 101 years old. 

The other suspects, Hanif Thompson, of Irvington, and Newark residents Karif Ford and Kevin Roberts have pleaded not guilty to felony murder and other charges in connection with the carjacking. They await trial.



Photo Credit: NBC 4 New York]]>
<![CDATA[Stranger Stabs, Robs Woman in East Village Apartment: NYPD]]> Mon, 26 Jun 2017 17:27:32 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/BECKFORD+STABBING+EAST+VILLAGE+VO+5PM+-+00002501_WNBC_000000016.jpg

A woman was robbed and stabbed in her East Village apartment Sunday night, and police are searching for the man who attacked her, they say. 

A man wearing a red shirt with white stripes broke into the 31-year-old woman's apartment on Avenue B, near East 13th Street, and stabbed the victim with a steak knife sometime after 8:30 p.m., police sources say. 

The woman was stabbed in the torso, arms and hands, according to police. The man then took $500 and ran away.

A friend found the victim at about 11 p.m. and called police. 

The woman was taken to Bellevue Hospital. 

Investigation was continuing Monday, and police officers were stationed outside the apartment building. 

Neighbors were stunned to hear of the violent attack. 

"That kind of puts an unsettling feeling on you, especially since I have a daughter," said Stefanie Nieves. "It's like, you're not even safe in your own home." 



Photo Credit: NBC 4 NY]]>
<![CDATA[NYPD: Choppers to Fly Over Midtown Tuesday Afternoon]]> Mon, 26 Jun 2017 16:03:42 -0400 http://media.nbcnewyork.com/images/213*120/nypd+chopper.jpg

The NYPD is advising the public of two helicopter flyovers scheduled for Tuesday afternoon over midtown.

The first chopper will be a red, white and blue Hughes 269C, to fly at an altitude of 1,500 feet or less at about 2:30 p.m. for about 20 minutes. 

The second helicopter, a black and gold Bell 206B, will fly between 4 p.m. and 7 p.m., at an altitude of 1,000 feet or less. 




Photo Credit: NBC 4 New York]]>